[REMOVE ADS]




Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,981
    Rep Power
    455

    James Brown Documentary-"Say It Loud" coming to A&E in February

    From udiscovermusic.com-

    In February, the A&E network will premiere the two-night documentary event James Brown: Say It Loud delving into the immeasurable musical and cultural impact of the entertainment icon.
    Across four hours, James Brown: Say it Loud traces the incredible trajectory of Brown’s life and career from a 7th grade drop-out arrested and jailed at the age of 16 for breaking into a car in the Jim Crow-era South, to an entertainment legend whose groundbreaking talent and unique perspective catapulted him to become a cultural force. His words, songs, style and moves inspired musical revolutions and molded a nation’s view of Black Pride and Black masculinity.
    Consistently facing obstacles and unbelievable odds, the documentary details how Brown persevered through decades of personal demons, racial injustice, and career setbacks to find redemption and become one of, if not the, most celebrated and influential artists of the 20th century.

    The new documentary features never-before-seen archival interviews and performances of James Brown, plus interviews with friends, family, musicians and proteges including The Rolling Stones’ legendary frontman Mick Jagger, Questlove, Bootsy Collins, LL Cool J, The Rev. Al Sharpton, Public Enemy’s Chuck D, Dallas Austin, Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, his children Deanna, Yamma and Larry Brown, and many more. James Brown: Say It Loud is a definitive look at a complicated life and a reflection on the immense impact Brown continues to have on music and culture today.

    James Brown: Say It Loud
    was directed by Deborah Riley Draper [The Legacy of Black Wall Street, Versailles ’73: American Runway Revolution] and executive produced by Mick Jagger, Academy Award winner Ahmir ‘Questlove’ Thompson, Tariq ‘Black Thought’ Trotter, Peter Afterman, David Blackman, Victoria Pearman, Bruce Resnikoff, Shawn Gee, Zarah Zohlman, Charlie Cohen, and Mari Keiko Gonzalez.

    James Brown: Say it Loud premieres Monday, February 19 and Tuesday, February 20 at 8PM ET/PT on A&E.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,981
    Rep Power
    455
    From udiscovermusic.com:

    James Brown’s Never-Before-Released ‘We Got To Change’ Is Out Now

    A never-before-released James Brown song, “We Got To Change,” is out now courtesy of Republic Records/UMe.

    Regarding the track, William “Bootsy” Collins said, “Can you imagine James Brown saying, ‘We got to change’?’ Well, he did…And who’s playing bass? Little ol’ funky me. Let’s go!” Check out the new song below.

    “James Brown always leaned into the social tip,” Bootsy continued. “He always was trying to keep the youngsters informed and the people informed on what’s going on. The new breed was coming in and certain things were going out. He loved to inform people on what was coming and what was going to be because he felt like he was part of it, and he was.”
    Recorded at Miami’s Criteria Studios on August 16, 1970, “We Got To Change” was laid down during a pivotal period in the world of James Brown—a few months earlier, longtime members of his famed James Brown Orchestra had walked out. Brown quickly assembled a new group anchored by guitarist Phelps “Catfish” Collins and bassist Bootsy Collins, two young brothers from Cincinnati.

    They brought a harder edge and a fresh identity to Brown’s music on such singles as “Get Up [I Feel Like Being] a Sex Machine,” “Super Bad,” and “Soul Power.” Brown called them The J.B.’s. Their Criteria session featured a reunion with one of Brown’s 1960s sidemen: the great Clyde Stubblefield. “The Funky Drummer,” as he was known, would grace several of Brown’s subsequent hits and become one of the most sampled drummers of the hip-hop era. Also on the track is James Brown’s longtime No.2, Bobby Byrd, who is heard alongside Brown on the chorus.
    The track is a testament to Brown’s diverse musical language, quoting from Little Jimmy Dickens’ 1949 hit “Take an Old Cold Tater [And Wait]” and the African-American anti-war spiritual, “Down by the Riverside.”


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,648
    Rep Power
    317
    Thanks for the heads up on the documentary. I saw a movie about James Brown about a decade ago and enjoyed it. I even enjoyed the music although while he was popular, I wasn't a fan.

    I set my DVR to record this. It is a four part documentary broadcasting two parts a night.

    I love these documentaries about music. Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,981
    Rep Power
    230
    sorry, I was not impressed by this new documentary.......the last 2 hrs are on tonight.What really bothers me is the talking and making claims about stuff from the late 50's/early 60's but showing film of the late 60's & early 70's.From the mid 60's until the 80's, I saw JB LIVE more times then I could count and knew many of his band members & personal friends with Bobby Byrd & Vicki Anderson.

  5. #5
    While it was interesting in places, it didn't provide any information that we didn't already know. I'm also concerned that the first two installments didn't feature Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker. There is no way you can do a JB documentary this extensive and not talk to Fred and Maceo.

    So to be clear, we have a four hour documentary [[with commercials) that doesn't feature the former musical director for James Brown as well as one of his most famous band members. That's inexcusable. No one can use the "you can't fit everything in one documentary" line. No mention of his two appearances on Soul Train where he commanded entire episodes? Repeating the tired "Disco killed the James Brown era" narrative while not mentioning the fact that he was pretty much dethroned by Sly and the Family Stone and then later George Clinton and P-Funk? They had four hours to do one job. Jeez...


































  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,981
    Rep Power
    230
    Anne Norman, the beautiful JB dancer of the late 60's early 70's, who is now a nurse, was interviewed but was not shown. Her feelings were hurt.She was also his personal secretary for awhile.They showed too much of these hip-hop rap artists, that did not know James Brown, nor were they around when he was THE STAR. Did not show Bootsey that much.

  7. #7
    That I know well. Ms. Norman responded to my Facebook post regarding the documentary. She was quite disappointed due to being cut from the actual broadcast. That is absolutely inexcusable.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

[REMOVE ADS]

Ralph Terrana
MODERATOR

Welcome to Soulful Detroit! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
Soulful Detroit is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to Soulful Detroit. [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.