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    Patti Jerome [[Mrs Harry Balk)

    Recently I was listening to the album "The Season For Miracles" by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles and noticed that the song "A Child Is Waiting" was written by Joe Hinton and Patti Jerome. I thought it a bit of a strange pairing and decided to see what the web said about it.

    Anyhow I came across the website Rock'n'Roll-Schallplatten and an amazing forum contribution from "Rockstar 54" who details the career of Patti Jerome [[singer P.J. of Tamla fame). I found it truly fascinating to read this so I'm going to provide the link as well as reproduce the main post in its entirety. The copyright is not mine at all. Obviously written before Harry Balk passed.

    https://www.rocknroll-schallplatten-...pic.php?t=8291

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    From Rockstar 54

    "Born in 1925, Patricia Jerome began her singing career at the age of 29 when she signed with Jerry Blaine’s Jubilee Records. She recorded with the Eddie Wilcox Orchestra [[who had some hits with The Bell Sisters). “Too Young To Die” backed with “Just A Friendly Hello” were released on Jubilee in July of 1954. A full-page ad was taken out in Billboard Magazine by Jubilee, proclaiming “Hits Galore in ’54,” showcasing The Orioles and introducing the public to “A New Star” in Patti Jerome.

    Patti released a follow-up single on Jubilee’s sister label, Josie, in early 1955. “Johnny has Gone” coupled with “After The Lights Go Down Low” featured the Sid Bass Orchesta, with Sid Bass on piano. Bass conducted and orchestrated successfully for Jubilee with the Orioles, and the idea was to capture and rub off some of that hit sound for Jerome. The record went almost unnoticed and Patti found herself out of a contract, which was for two singles.

    Patti found her way to Wing Records in the late summer of ’55. Wing was a subsidiary label of Mercury, based out of Chicago. The Pinelawn Music Publishing arm gave Patti the Dion McGregor/Robert Cobert composition “One” to record, along with another tune titled “All Is Well.” Patti was backed vocally on these sides by the Jack Halloran Singers, who sang behind Johnny Cash and gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, and would later sing behind Ray Charles. The orchestra was conducted by David Carroll, and the single was released in November of 1955. Patti got some bookings at night clubs and other formal occasions with the moderate success of this single.

    In late 1956, Jerome signed on to George Goldner’s Rama label in New York City. With the Bob Armstrong Orchestra, she recorded “My Doggie Wag His Tail” and “Just As I Am,” released on Rama #219 in the early spring of 1957. Goldner and partner Joe Kolsky had hired Morris Levy as president of their major label, Roulette. On April 6, 1957, it was announced in Billboard Magazine that “Goldner has sold his interests in the Roulette, Rama, Gee, and Tico labels outright to Morris Levy.” Levy owned several nightclubs in mid-town Manhattan, was known to associate with the Mafia, was in business with deejay Alan Freed [[who was involved in the Payola scandals) and, with Freed, helped to promote the hugely successful Rock ‘n Roll Shows at the Brooklyn Paramount Theater. Levy accumulated a vast fortune from publishing copyrights. Patti, as did other artists on the label, got some gigs singing at Morris Levy’s nightclubs around Manhattan to stay working.

    Jerome would eventually meet Harry Balk, who was managing Little Willie John and Kenny Martin under the King banner. They wasted no time getting married in ’58 and having a baby girl, whom they named Vicki. Balk would name his music publishing company, Vicki Music” in September of ’58 while also creating the Twirl Records label.

    After taking a couple of years off from singing to raise her daugther, Patti recorded J.B. Lenoir’s “Mojo” and the Arthur Freed / Nacio Herb Brown tune “All I Do Is Dream Of You” in the summer of ’61. Balk booked Mirasound Studios and produced the session, with arranger/conductor Bill Ramal on the floor and engineer Bill MacMeekin in the sound booth turning the knobs. “Mojo” was up-tempo and fast paced, with crashing thunder amongst layers of strings that made for a great listen! “Mojo” hailed as one of Jerome’s best recordings to date, one that anyone could really clap or dance to.

    Having consistent hit-maker Del Shannon under contract, Harry Balk flew with Patti and Del Shannon to Nashville in the first week of May 1962, to look for some new songs and what’s more, a new sound. Balk, Jerome, and Shannon drove around Nashville to all of the publishing firms, to meet with singers and songwriters. They came across Willie Nelson who gave them “Lonely Little Mansion” to record, while the songwriting partners of Kent Westberry and Wayne Gray offered “Hurt O’ Clock.” A visit with Roger Miller brought “The Swiss Maid” for Shannon to record. Balk sets up two recording sessions at Columbia Recording Studio at 804 16th Avenue South in Nashville.

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    ....continued

    Balk wanted the best that Nashville had to offer, and spared no expense. On May 8th of ’62 in the late hours, Patti and Del shared a split recording session, recording “Lonely Little Mansion” and “Hurt O’ Clock” for Jerome, and Shannon’s own compositions for himself, “Cry Myself To Sleep” and “I’m Gonna Move On.” Harold Bradley and Thomas ‘Grady’ Martin played guitars, Bob Moore played bass, Murray ‘Buddy Harman played drums, Hargus ‘Pig’ Robbins played piano, organ, and harpsichord, and Homer ‘Boots’ Randolph played saxophone. Male and female vocals were supplied by the Jordanaires and the Anita Kerr Singers, both groups of which recorded behind Elvis Presley, Conway Twitty, Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, the Everly Brothers, and many more. Harry Balk produced.

    The following evening on May 9th, again in the wee hours, Del Shannon recorded four more sides: “The Swiss Maid,” “Dream Baby,” “She Thinks I Still Care,” and “Runaround Sue.” “Because we booked studio time in a flash,” Balk explained, “We had to book midnight sessions in order to get the studio time. Which was okay with me. I liked to book studio sessions late anyhow, when nobody else was around. This way we could have the studios to ourselves, and in my experience artists didn’t sing as well in the morning hours.”

    Balk released Patti’s “Lonely Little Mansion” on his own label, Twirl Records, in September of ’62, with a full-page ad in Billboard that also shared promotion of fellow stable artists The Young Sisters with “Casanova Brown.”
    The Twirl single had limited distribution and never really broke nationally. The Young Sisters achieved slightly better success, managing to break the Top 100 for one week at #94, and would soon become Del Shannon’s female vocal singers a la “Little Town Flirt” and “Two Kind of Teardrops,” among others.

    Working with a folk group, The Topsiders, Balk combed catalogs of music for past hit songs to cover. They settled on “Let the Good Times Roll” and “Heartbreak Hotel.” Balk set up some recording time at United Sound Systems in Detroit, and The Topsiders split a three hour studio session with Patti Jerome. “Lazy River” was selected for Jerome, a Sidney Arodin and Hoagy Carmichael co-write from ’53. Carmichael wrote the big smash “Heart and Soul” in 1951. “Only You” was chosen as the flipside, the Buck Ram and Ande Rand tune that became a monster hit for The Platters in 1955, achieving the #1 spot on the R & B charts for seven weeks and breaking the Pop Top 10.

    All four sides were leased to the Josie label, The Topsiders’ release as #45-907, and Jerome’s release as #45-908 in 1963. Both singles saw some action in pockets around the country and, in the case of The Topsiders, was successful enough to record and release a full album, titled “Rock Goes Folk” with the Josie catalog number JOZ 4000, produced by Harry Balk as a “King-Mack Production” [[Balk used the pseudonym “Tom King” and his partner Irving Micahnik used the name “Ira Mack”).

    In 1965, Lou Guarino, who was formerly general manager at World Artists Records, created the American Arts label, and hired Harry Balk on as the head of A & R. Balk brought with him artists to sign on with the label, namely Patti Jerome, Mickey Denton, and The Volumes. By this time, Balk had a hot songwriter named Barney “Duke” Browner. He was already writing for Mickey Denton, and embarked on a new era with The Volumes, shying away from the doo-wop sound they were known for, and re-establishing them as more of a soul act.

    “Baby Let Me Be Your Baby” written by Ben Raleigh and Bob Halley was issued as the plug side on American Arts #AA-10 in ’65. Duke Browner wrote the bottom side, titled “No More Tears.” The production work by Balk on “Tears” was quite good, Jerome’s singing was urgent, and Browner’s songwriting was impeccable. It became a Detroit classic and continues to get spins by Northern Soul enthusiasts across the Atlantic Ocean.
    In the late fall of 1965, Balk formed Impact Records, and Patti wrote one of her first compositions, a co-write with break-out / novelty artist Dickie Goodman, titled “Please Mr. President.” Goodman appeared on one Twirl release, and was a very good friend of Balk’s arranger, Bill Ramal, which helps to explain the connection here. “President” was released by The Boss Five on Impact #1003.

    In ’67, Jerome teamed up with Mickey Denton, who was also signed to Impact. They released a single as a duo, dubbing themselves “Patti & Mickey” on Impact #1027. This 45rpm featured a cover of the Smokey Robinson hit “My Girl” reworked as “My Guy/My Girl.” The flipside was an original penned by Jerome and Denton, called “You Can’t Buy Back Yesterday.” Balk produced, John Brooks arranged.

    Within a year, Balk would sell off the Impact label to Berry Gordy at Motown. Harry formed a new label called Inferno but it lived a very short life when Balk again sold the label to Gordy and came to work for him at Motown.
    “In the end, just about everybody sold to Motown,” Balk admitted in a 2009 phone interview. “I kept my Gomba publishings, at least at that time, and started the Rare Earth label for Berry.” Patti Jerome followed her husband, signing on as a writer to Jobete, Motown’s publishing arm. Patti collaborated on a few songs with Joe Hinton in ’70 and ’71, including “Knock On My Door,” “A Child Is Waiting,” and “Chain Reaction.” She also hashed out some tunes with MikeValvano, such as “What You See Is What You Get,” “It Takes All Kinds Of People,” and “I’d Love To Be As Heavy As Jesus,” with Ralph Terrana.

    Patti would also co-write with Paul Riser and Ollie McLaughlin in the summer of ’71 “It Takes A Man To Teach A Woman How To Love.” McLaughlin, who hailed from Ann Arbor, Michigan, owned four record labels himself, and was formerly a deejay who discovered Deon Jackson, Barbara Lewis, and most notably Del Shannon. Patti would team up with Pam Sawyer and Gloria Jones and, together, they wrote “T.L.C.” [[standing for “Tender Loving Care”). “T.L.C.” had hit potential, and in January 1972 it was issued as a single on the Tamla label, a sub-label to Motown. Patti went under the name “P.J.” and “It Takes A Man To Teach A Woman How To Love” became the B-side. David Van DePitte and Robert White arranged, while Pam Sawyer and Gloria Jones produced. The single was issued right after Christmas, sandwiched between two Stevie Wonder releases: “What Christmas Means To Me” from November ‘71, and April 1972’s “Superwoman.”

    Motown soon shut down its Detroit operations by June 1972, and relocated to California. So ended the music career of Patti Jerome, and the dawning of a movie career as she and hubby Harry made the pilgrimage to Los Angeles with Motown, and settled in their new digs in North Hollywood.

    In 1975, Patti appeared in a B-movie called "White House Madness," Mark Lester's outrageous Watergate comedy that received a rating of one of five stars. This led to the film “Rancho Deluxe” released the same year, in which Patti played the nameless "Madame" directed by Frank Perry and starring Jeff Bridges.

    September 1978 saw the cinema release of the Robert Stigwood critically panned big screen version of Sgt. Pepper’s, starring Peter Frampton and The Bee Gees. A Dee Anthony film, it was written by Henry Edwards. Patti landed the role of Saralinda Shears, starring with Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb [[who played the Hendersons in the film), “The Jerk” comedian Steve Martin as Dr. Maxwell Edison, and George Burns in the role of Mr. Kite. Filmed at Universal Studios in Hollywood, the “Being For The Benefit of Mr. Kite” scenes were recorded on the courtyard that would become famous seven years later in the box office smash “Back To The Future” where the Hill Valley “Clock Tower” stood. Groups Aerosmith and Earth Wind and Fire appeared in the film, as did Del Shannon at the ending credits along with a cast of other recording stars. Shannon would sign to Stigwood’s RSO label, which folded shortly in 1979, forcing Shannon to find a new label, eventually signing to Network/Elektra for the Tom Petty produced album, “Drop Down and Get Me.”

    The Sgt. Pepper’s film inspired Harry Balk to get back into music production, after having taken some time off. Balk produced the Maestro Carmen Dragon in March of ’79 with [[Paul) Sabu on Orinda Records, covering the Bee Gee’s “Stayin’ Alive.” Balk would also record and produce Cynthia Black on the Orinda label. Notably, Harry Balk was again on the cutting edge while recording Carmen Dragon, as he was one of the very first producers to record digitally as early as 1979!

    In 1980, Patti auditioned and got a bit role in the movie "Alligator,” which starred Robert Forster. 1981 saw Patti playing the "Matron" in "Buddy Buddy,” a Billy Wilder film, that starred Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau, later of "Grumpy Old Men" fame. In ‘82 Patti played the "Maid" in "Rosie: The Rosemary Clooney Story," which starred Sondra Locke and Tony Orlando, directed by Jackie Cooper.

    Never really landing a major film role, Patti finally decided to retire in the early 1980’s, and she and Harry lived off their old music royalties. Singer Meatloaf would record and release an album titled "Live Around The World" which featured live performances between 1987 – 1996. Featured on the album was her composition "What You See Is What You Get," written with Michael Valvano.

    In the late 1990’s, Patti battled some illnesses. Patricia Jerome Balk passed away with the new millennium, having released ten singles on various labels and starring in a handful of Hollywood movies. Harry would stay in the L.A. basin for a few more years, then decided to move back to Detroit in 2007 to live with his daughter Vicki. Retired, Harry recently sold off his Gomba music publishing and tries to take it easy. He still converses regularly with artists from the past and makes a few appearances or allows the occasional interview"

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    Her Tamla single T.L.C. was a hit in New Orleans and made some noise nationwide. It remains one of my all time favs, with a smokin' Funk Bros track and some serious wailin' by the Andantes behind her. Was one of the last Funk Bros Motown sessions.

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    After Patti died I would call Harry to see how he was doing. One day was memorable when he simply said.."Waiting for the smoke to clear." Harry and Patti were inseparable and my heart broke for Harry.

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    Patti was a gifted writer and it was great having her contributions to the Stoney and Meat Loaf album. She helped write the lyrics on much of the album.

  8. #8
    This is so fascinating. I've only recently heard Patti's Tamla single and thought how very good it sounded. It's the type of record you hear and wonder why you haven't heard it before...or why there weren't more records. Patti's story strikes me as being similar to Debbie Dean's- a LOT of solid, hard work and effort with singing, recording, songwriting and even acting. Many thanks for the link and posting that account. I love hearing that she and husband Harry had a wonderful marriage. Does anyone know if Patti recorded other songs at Motown that weren't released?

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    Harry was producing an album on Patti. I don't remember much about it. I don't think it was ever released.
    One day, after many hours in the studio doing vocals in the studio they came to my office. Patti was upset because Harry wanted to redo the vocals. He wasn't satisfied with what he had. Patti plead her case to me and I had to back Harry. He was her producer. I guess it isn't what she wanted to hear from me and turned to leave my office saying "Excuse me while I go throw up".

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ralpht View Post
    Harry was producing an album on Patti. I don't remember much about it. I don't think it was ever released.
    One day, after many hours in the studio doing vocals in the studio they came to my office. Patti was upset because Harry wanted to redo the vocals. He wasn't satisfied with what he had. Patti plead her case to me and I had to back Harry. He was her producer. I guess it isn't what she wanted to hear from me and turned to leave my office saying "Excuse me while I go throw up".
    Wow, now THAT is a classic exit line! I may use that one sometimes for emphasis. It would be a real treat to hear what Patti and Harry had recorded. Patti meshed very well with the Funk Brothers.

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    I've loved P.J.'s "T.L.C. [[Tender Loving Care)" from the first time I heard it at the Geneva Coin, Stamp & Record Shop upon its 45 release in 1971. Naturally, I had to buy a copy right then and there, and have loved it ever since! I was so glad to finally get a copy of it from the master tape in the magnificent CD series, "The Complete Motown Singles [[Vol. 11B: 1971).

    I would sure love to hear the tracks that Harry had recorded on Patti. Gotta wonder, might they still be on file in the Motown vaults?
    Last edited by Philles/Motown Gary; 01-07-2023 at 02:28 AM.

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    You'd have to ask Andy Skurow or George Solomon about unreleased tracks. I'd love to hear them too.

    Patti did re-record TLC for Ian Levine's MotorCity label around 1990 or so. It stayed pretty close to the original on lengthened a bit. This might have been her last released recording.

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    I had no idea she was a blue-eyed soul singer! WOW...

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    Id totally let "T.L.C." pass me by, but since I played it for the first time this week, Ive been listening to it non-stop! What a great track!!!



    Seems like Patti lived a great and very eventful life!

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    Amazingly lots always wondered who P.J was.



    TLC [also a Northern Soul 45} link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uB8QNFlNaLQ
    Last edited by Graham Jarvis; 02-11-2023 at 07:36 AM.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by TomatoTom123 View Post
    Id totally let "T.L.C." pass me by, but since I played it for the first time this week, Ive been listening to it non-stop! What a great track!!!



    Seems like Patti lived a great and very eventful life!
    Wow, Tom! I didn't know about this one. I'm blown away by this! I mean, this is startlingly good. The production is tight and Patti is slaying it from start to finish. It really is a shame just how much truly great music gets ignored or unfortunately overlooked. Thanks for pointing this one out. Yeah, I'm like you now because l'm going to be playing this all day!
    Last edited by WaitingWatchingLookingForAChance; 02-11-2023 at 10:11 AM.

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    I bought the Tamla 45 of P.J.'s "T.L.C [[Tender Loving Care)" upon its original release back in 1972. Couldn't stop playing it -- over and over and over again! Pity it didn't get airplay. Fans who are hearing it now for the first time are loving it. I think the general public would have loved it, too, if only they'd had a chance to hear it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WaitingWatchingLookingForAChance View Post
    Wow, Tom! I didn't know about this one. I'm blown away by this! I mean, this is startlingly good. The production is tight and Patti is slaying it from start to finish. It really is a shame just how much truly great music gets ignored or unfortunately overlooked. Thanks for pointing this one out. Yeah, I'm like you now because l'm going to be playing this all day!
    Youre damn right WaitingWatching!!!

    Im also enjoying PJ's "It Takes A Man To Teach A Woman How To Love"


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    Quote Originally Posted by Philles/Motown Gary View Post
    I bought the Tamla 45 of P.J.'s "T.L.C [[Tender Loving Care)" upon its original release back in 1972. Couldn't stop playing it -- over and over and over again! Pity it didn't get airplay. Fans who are hearing it now for the first time are loving it. I think the general public would have loved it, too, if only they'd had a chance to hear it.
    I think youre right Gary!!

    Do you think it would have stood more of a chance if it had been released under Patti Jerome rather than P.J.? Does anyone know why P.J. was preferred?

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    I have never got the understanding of just "P.J." But she and Harry lovely people.
    here's P.J. & T.L.C.

    Last edited by Graham Jarvis; 02-13-2023 at 05:51 AM. Reason: error

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by BayouMotownMan View Post
    You'd have to ask Andy Skurow or George Solomon about unreleased tracks. I'd love to hear them too.

    Patti did re-record TLC for Ian Levine's MotorCity label around 1990 or so. It stayed pretty close to the original on lengthened a bit. This might have been her last released recording.
    There appears to be at least 6 or 7 complete tracks or at least complete with lead vocals by Patti which seem to include a version of a well know Stevie Wonder track. When or where or if these will ever see release is in the lap of the gods.

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    "A Cellarful Of Motown Volume 6"? Or maybe an ACE girls release?

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by paul_nixon View Post
    There appears to be at least 6 or 7 complete tracks or at least complete with lead vocals by Patti which seem to include a version of a well know Stevie Wonder track. When or where or if these will ever see release is in the lap of the gods.
    Hey Paul, thanks for the info.What's the Stevie Wonder cover Patti recorded? Let's hope those gods want their laps back and release the P. J. tracks!

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by PauloRich View Post
    Hey Paul, thanks for the info.What's the Stevie Wonder cover Patti recorded? Let's hope those gods want their laps back and release the P. J. tracks!
    Looks like she recorded a version of Heaven Help Us All produced by her husband

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by paul_nixon View Post
    Looks like she recorded a version of Heaven Help Us All produced by her husband
    Ooo that could be a little gem. Especially if it featured the Funk Brothers/Andantes and produced by Harry Balk. That has the potential to bring up some interesting production sounds. I can imagine Patti Jerome's round vocal tone sitting well on that Stevie track. A nice choice from the extensive Wonderepertoire!

    It would be interesting to hear the difference to the original and the other Motown interpritations such as David Ruffin, The God Squad ft Leonard Caston and Charlene Duncan.

    Thanks for sharing Paul. Hopefully one day the heavens will help us all hear it

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    More than likely what sunk this project was Patti's age. She was a middle aged woman trying to break a record smack dab in the middle of an era where the youth was told to trust no one over thirty. All in the timing. Too bad. Patti had the talent.

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by ralpht View Post
    More than likely what sunk this project was Patti's age. She was a middle aged woman trying to break a record smack dab in the middle of an era where the youth was told to trust no one over thirty. All in the timing. Too bad. Patti had the talent.
    I think you nailed it. It's the same thing with the material Connie Haines, Barbara McNair and Billy Eckstine recorded at Motown, specifically the things they recorded that had the more signature Motown Sound. There are some stunning, rocking performances that never got further than the shelf. We hear it now, over 50 years later and we think there are potential hits - but I've grown to realize that no matter how great the vaulted material was, these artists were about 10 to 20 years older than the prime listening audience. It's the same thing that hurt Peggy Lee; she had a surprise hit with "Is That All There Is" but it was an anomaly. She was the age of the parents of the kids listening to Top 40 and this would be the only pass she'd ever get from those kids. And she pretty much knew it.

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    Like most of you I think I know my Motown. And I was always aware there was something released US only by someone or a band called PJ. It was only until I read the first few posts in this thread that I knew anything about the artist, 50 years or so on. And when I sought out the track TLC on YT, I was blown away. I’ve now got the Tamla single, and it will be getting aired in my next DJ spot

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    But even now, and especially back then, not every record was put out with the expectation it would be a big hit. Motown has long been involved in these specialised markets - easy listening, jazz, blues and even country, for example. That's not to say they wouldn't have achieved decent sales on these acts but I'm sure they weren't at all expecting Billy Eckstine to achieve Top 20 success on the pop charts. Why start the Black Forum label if all they wanted were hits.

    I would suggest that the Rare Earth label followed the same trend by putting out some of the material they did - The Impact of Brass or XIT for example. I don't buy the age argument at all - Motown were aiming at a different market. Pretty much all the record labels did the same - perhaps with an exception being Phil Spector's Philles but even then he still put out an album by Lenny Bruce.

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    Ralph, I love Patti's version of "[[I've Given You) The Best Years Of My Life" every bit as much as I love Martha's version on The Vandellas' "Black Magic" album. True, Patti's lead vocals are more adult middle-of-the-road than they were on "TLC", but the instrumentak track and back-up vocals are gorgeous! These must be the tracks you were referring to when you recently said that after a day of recording, Harry insisted that Patti re-do her lead vocals to which she was not thrilled!

    I agree -- we've gotta hear those previously-unreleased tracks.
    Last edited by Philles/Motown Gary; 02-16-2023 at 03:13 AM.

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    I can't believe that Harry would release Patti with the name P.J. It doesn't hit me right. However, other than the incident in my office, I don't remember a thing. I suppose I was wrapped up in my own things. I hate to admit it but at the time I thought Harry was making a mistake because of Patti's age.

    I never got to see it, but Harry told me Patti was a dynamite night club act. I believed that just knowing Patti's personality.
    Last edited by ralpht; 02-16-2023 at 12:46 PM.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by ralpht View Post
    I can't believe that Harry would release Patti with the name P.J. It doesn't hit me right. However, other than the incident in my office, I don't remember a thing. I suppose I was wrapped up in my own things. I hate to admit it but at the time I thought Harry was making a mistake because of Patti's age.

    I never got to see it, but Harry told me Patti was a dynamite night club act. I believed that just knowing Patti's personality.
    Super interesting insights. From an outsider's perspective, I feel a few things were in play.

    I 100% agree that the 'P.J.' moniker is a tough sell. It's too abstract and alienating and way before Hip Hop made abbreviations a given aka RZA, SZA and BZA.

    Post the murder of Dr MLK soul was in a new birth and flux, more social commentary and harder sounds. Soft soul tagged along but took a back seat. For Motown the sweet soul of lesser-known artists like P.J., The Lollipops etc - though brilliant - was overshadowed by social and musical changes from 1969-1972.

    Pre-internet it was hard to get air time, and there were political landscapes. I don't think age was a fundemental factor, timing, race, gender and profile were for sure.

    Aging white male 'crooners' like Frank Sinatra, Bing Cosby, Dean Martin could mostly gaurantee a prime spot somewhere and transitioned the decades still being household names. Female and Black singers had a harder time i.e the aforementioned's peer, Sammy Davis Jr.

    There were still plenty of 'showtime' shows on TV but you had to be pretty big [[and lucky) to get one. A 'Patti Jerome show' produced by Motown and hosted by Patti featuring other acts from the label would have potentially worked. But that would have required substantial funds and resources and I guess at the time Patti just wasn't known enough and Motown were still at the early stage of the film production phase.

    Motown had pretty much nailed the Copa supper club thing [[to much resistance) at this point, and it was dabbling around in musicals. The Copa shows woked as TV shows and productions. There was definitely a missed opportunity here that was overtaken by the pioneering Temptations and Supremes tv shows, and the doors they were opening.

    No disrespect to Ms Stevens, but I would have Patti Jerome [[or Connie Van Dyke) over Kaye Stevens on the 1969 'The Temptations Show' TV broadcast. Though I actually would have loved the female guest to have actually been Barbara Randolp or Barbara McNair. Still, I'm pretty sure all these decisions were taken with intention and as part of a bigger overall Motown plan.

    This all led to P.J. slipping through the net but left us with memorable songs and recordings that still live on - and for us to muse another 'whatcouldabin'. It's inspiring how much addoration she is still recieving. RIP.

    Going back to the start of the thread, Patti's 'A Child Is Waiting' was released again in 1971 on Rare Earth by Dave Prince, a DJ from WYMJH, seemingly produced by Harry Balk.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv4F7HyJ6KY

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