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Thread: Google doodles

  1. #7051
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    9 June 2016

    Phoebe Snetsinger’s 85th birthday




    Phoebe Snetsinger was an American birder famous for having seen and documented birds of 8,398 different species, at the time, more than anyone else in history and the first person to see more than 8,000. Her memoir, Birding on Borrowed Time, explores this achievement. She traveled the world multiple times to find birds in their habitats. She was described as having had an excellent memory, and a strong competitive spirit.
    Sometimes it takes dire circumstances to compel us toward action. Phoebe Snetsinger, who would have been 85 years old today, became the world’s most prolific bird-watcher — a feat she achieved by surmounting tremendous odds.

    It wasn’t until 1981 — when she was diagnosed with cancer — that Phoebe truly came into her own as a birder. In subsequent years, she scoured the globe for obscure or unknown bird species, ultimately raising her bird count to 8,393, the highest in the world at the time. Some of the notable birds she sighted include the Blackburnian Warbler and the Red-Shouldered Vanga, depicted among many other interesting birds by animator Juliana Chen.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-28-2021 at 08:54 AM.

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    9 Jun 2016

    Elizabeth Garrett Anderson’s 180th birthday







    Born 180 years ago today, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson was the first woman to qualify as a physician and surgeon in Britain. She had a penchant for “firsts,” snagging many more during her illustrious career. She co-founded the first hospital staffed by women, and became the first dean of a British medical school. She even broke barriers across borders as France’s first female doctor.

    Her accomplishments were gained through struggle and tenacity. When she was barred from medical school, she studied privately through tutors. Though the system prevented women from obtaining a medical degree, Garrett Anderson found a loophole and passed her medical exam with the highest marks.

    As Britain’s first female doctor, Garrett Anderson was a fearless advocate for the care and advancement of women. Today’s doodle memorializes the infrastructure she set up to usher other women into the profession, as well as her devotion to the poor women and children she treated at her clinic.

    After a long and successful career, Garrett Anderson broke one more barrier: becoming Britain’s first female mayor in 1908.

  3. #7053
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    10 Jun 2016

    UEFA Euro 2016







    It’s time for UEFA Euro 2016! France plays host to the world’s second-largest football championships from June 10 – July 10. Nearly 2 million fans are expected to travel to France to cheer teams from 24 countries in stadiums across the nation, while over 300 million are expected to tune in from afar. Whether you’re hoping Spain will defend their title or are counting on an upset, here’s to an exciting tournament!

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    12 Jun 2016

    Philippines Independence Day 2016






    Today marks Philippine Independence Day, and the first month since their national elections. In today's Doodle by Robinson Wood, we can see elated citizens celebrating on a jeepney: an iconic Filipino traveling vehicle. You can see these types of buses all over Manila, which is the capital and the center of many of today's festivities. One of the most important Freedom Day traditions is the raising of the flag, and cities all over the Philippines will proudly hoist the blue, red and white.

    As Filipinos rally around their new President, Vice President and senators, we hope today's Doodle inspires a sense of bayanihan — a sense of working together for a common cause. The brilliant colors of the Doodle and the hopeful faces reflect the bright future of this great nation and its people.

  5. #7055
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    12 June 2014

    Philippine Independence Day 2014




    Happy Independence Day to the Philippines! Our doodle depicts “Bayanihan,” a Filipino tradition where members of a community help a family move by literally carrying their house to a new place.

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    12 Jun 2014

    World Cup 2014 #1





    Anything can happen during the World Cup. Who’ll win? Who’ll score? Which super psychic animal will replace Paul the Octopus?

  7. #7057
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    12 June 2017
    Philippine Independence Day 2017





    The flag of the Philippines is a symbol of national pride, especially today as the country celebrates the anniversary of its sovereignty. In honor of Philippine Independence Day, today’s Doodle is a colorful celebration of both the Philippine flag and the country’s unique island landscapes.

    Each component of the flag’s design holds specific meaning. The prominent sunburst has eight rays to represent the eight provinces that began the fight for independence, while the three surrounding stars represent the country’s three island groups: Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao.

    With more than 7,000 islands that make up the country, there is no shortage of opportunities to watch the sun rise over the water. The sunrise imagery in the Doodle is meant to capture Filipinos’ optimism in the face of adversity.

    In the foreground of today’s Doodle, a group of people gather for a traditional flag-raising ceremony. Accompanied by the Philippine national anthem, these ceremonies are held daily at schools and weekly in government institutions.

    Maligayang Araw ng Kalayaan [Happy Independence Day]!


    Illustrated by guest artist, Dan Matutina

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    21 June 2002

    La Fęte de la Musique 2002





    The Fęte de la Musique, also known in English as Music Day, Make Music Day or World Music Day, is an annual music celebration that takes place on 21 June. On Music Day, citizens and residents are urged to play music outside in their neighborhoods or in public spaces and parks. Free concerts are also organized, where musicians play for fun and not for payment.

    The first all-day musical celebration on the day of the summer solstice was originated by Jack Lang, then Minister of Culture of France, as well as by Maurice Fleuret; it was celebrated in Paris in 1982. Music Day later became celebrated in 120 countries around the world.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-28-2021 at 09:06 PM.

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    1 Jul 2002

    Canada Day 2002


  10. #7060
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    5 Nov 2002

    Guy Fawkes Day 2002






    Guy Fawkes also known as Guido Fawkes while fighting for the Spanish, was a member of a group of provincial English Catholics who was involved in the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

    Guy Fawkes Night celebrates the foiling of an attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament in London on November 5, 1605. The attack was planned by a group of Catholic conspirators, which included Guy Fawkes. The explosives would have been set off when King James I of England [King James VI of Scotland] and many parliamentary members were in the building. The conspirators were later arrested, tortured and executed.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-28-2021 at 09:27 PM.

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    13 Dec 2002

    Santa Lucia 2002





    Saint Lucy's Day, also called the Feast of Saint Lucy, is a Christian feast day observed on 13 December. The observance commemorates Lucia of Syracuse, an early-4th-century virgin martyr under the Diocletianic Persecution, who according to legend brought food and aid to Christians hiding in the Roman catacombs, wearing a candle lit wreath on her head to light her way and leave her hands free to carry as much food as possible. Her feast day, which coincided with the shortest day of the year prior to calendar reforms, is widely celebrated as a festival of light. Falling within the Advent season, Saint Lucy's Day is viewed as a precursor of Christmastide, pointing to the arrival of the Light of Christ in the calendar on Christmas Day.

    Saint Lucy's Day is celebrated most widely in Scandinavia and in Italy, with each emphasising a different aspect of her story. In Scandinavia, where Lucy is called Santa Lucia in Norwegian and Danish and Sankta Lucia in Swedish, she is represented as a lady in a white dress symbolizing a baptismal robe and a red sash symbolizing the blood of her martyrdom, with a crown or wreath of candles on her head.

    In Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Swedish-speaking regions of Finland, as songs are sung, girls dressed as Saint Lucy carry cookies and saffron buns in procession, which symbolizes bringing the Light of Christ into the world's darkness. In both Protestant and Catholic churches, boys participate in the procession as well, playing different roles associated with Christmastide, such as that of Saint Stephen. The celebration of Saint Lucy's Day is said to help one live the winter days with enough light.

    A special devotion to Saint Lucy is practiced in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Veneto, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige, in the north of the country, and Sicily, in the south, as well as in the Croatian coastal region of Dalmatia. In Hungary and Croatia, a popular tradition on Saint Lucy's Day involves planting wheat grains that grow to be several centimetres tall by Christmas Day, representing the Nativity of Jesus.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 08:00 AM.

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    19 Jan 2003

    Dr Martin Luther King Day 2003



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    21 Apr 2003

    Earth Day 2003



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    21 April 2014

    Charlotte Brontë's 198th Birthday [born 1816]






    Charlotte Brontë was an English novelist and poet, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters who survived into adulthood and whose novels became classics of English literature.

    She enlisted in school at Roe Head in January 1831, aged 14 years. She left the year after to teach her sisters, Emily and Anne, at home, returning in 1835 as a governess. In 1839 she undertook the role as governess for the Sidgwick family but left after a few months to return to Haworth where the sisters opened a school, but failed to attract pupils. Instead, they turned to writing and they each first published in 1846 under the pseudonyms of Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. Although her first novel, The Professor, was rejected by publishers, her second novel, Jane Eyre, was published in 1847. The sisters admitted to their Bell pseudonyms in 1848, and by the following year were celebrated in London literary circles.

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    23 Apr 2014

    Pixinguinha's 117th Birthday [born 1897]





    Alfredo da Rocha Viana Filho, known as Pixinguinha was a Brazilian composer, arranger, flautist and saxophonist born in Rio de Janeiro. Pixinguinha is considered one of the greatest Brazilian composers of popular music, particularly within the genre of music known as choro. By integrating the music of the older choro composers of the 19th century with contemporary jazz-like harmonies, Afro-Brazilian rhythms, and sophisticated arrangements, he introduced choro to a new audience and helped to popularize it as a uniquely Brazilian genre. He was also one of the first Brazilian musicians and composers to take advantage of the new professional opportunities offered to musicians by the new technologies of radio broadcasting and studio recording. Pixinguinha composed dozens of choros, including some of the best-known works in the genre such as "Carinhoso", "Glória", "Lamento" and "Um a Zero".
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 08:16 AM.

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    23 April 2021

    St. George's Day 2021





    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by U.K.-based guest artist Ruby Fresson, honors England’s celebration of St. George’s Day and the legend behind this special day that has captured the imagination of generations.

    The legend of St. George traces its roots back to the Middle Ages when 11th-century Crusaders returned to England and shared his venerable story of valor and sacrifice. Accounts lauded St. George as a hero who rescued not only a princess but an entire city under siege from a fire-breathing dragon! Upon his valiant horseback arrival, St. George slew the dragon, a battle scene recreated in today’s Doodle artwork. Rose bushes are said to have grown across the village after the dragon’s defeat and St. George picked a fresh rose to give to the rescued princess.

    Following his success, the villagers held a massive feast in St. George’s honor—a tradition which has been passed down through the ages—as has giving a rose to a loved one in some cultures.

    Happy St. George’s Day!

  17. #7067
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    23 April 2015

    St. George's Day 2015





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    23 April 2018

    St George's Day 2018




    Each year on April 23, England celebrates St. George’s Day, in recognition of the life and lore of the country’s patron saint.

    According to legend, St George was born in present-day Turkey around 280 A.D.. He served as a soldier in the Roman army, rising to the rank of legatus, but was executed by the Emperor Diocletian for his Christian faith.

    Popular legend also celebrates St George’s chivalry and bravery. A fearsome dragon, Ascalon, terrorized the people of a small town and demanded a daily sacrifice to allow them water for their families. One day, it was the turn of the king’s daughter to be sacrificed to the dragon, but St. George rode in on horseback, drew his sword and slayed the dragon — saving the town and the princess’s life.

    Today’s Doodle depicts a group of adorable English children reenacting the legend of St. George and the dragon. The cast of characters are beloved in English folklore. You can spot St. George and his dragon, Robin Hood, and a child dressed as a lion, the symbol of bravery in medieval English heraldry. You can even see Titania and Nick Bottom, a tribute to Shakespeare whose birthday is also today!

    If you find yourself in England, feast on a traditional English meal, and take in the sight of Saint George's Cross flags flying on every street. Happy St. George’s Day!

    Doodle by guest artist Luke Pearson

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    17 November 2019

    Czechia Freedom & Democracy Day 2019







    Today’s Doodle celebrates Czechia’s Freedom & Democracy Day. One of the Czech Republic’s most important national holidays, November 17th marks a major anniversary in the country’s struggle for liberty and government by the people.

    On this day in 1989, thousands of university students lit candles and chanted “we have bare hands” in unarmed protest against Czechoslovakia’s repressive Soviet-backed government. The demonstration was inspired by a similar uprising 50 years before during World War II. A series of escalating protests triggered the nonviolent “Velvet Revolution,” which led to democratic reforms that allowed dissident playwright Václav Havel to be elected President of Czechoslovakia the following month.

    Although the Czech Republic and Slovakia became separate states in 1993, Freedom & Democracy Day is still observed in both countries. The occasion is marked by street festivals, cultural events, candle-lighting ceremonies, and government officials paying respect to the sacrifices of student activists over the years.

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    17 November 2017

    Czech Republic National Day of Freedom 2017





    November 17th is celebrated as the National Day of Freedom in the Czech Republic. To Czechs around the world, today represents decades of work that were necessary for government reform. The nation’s transition to democracy began on this day in 1989 with a peaceful demonstration started by university students in Prague. Hundreds of thousands of protesters eventually joined, creating a movement that is now known as "The Velvet Revolution" or "The Gentle Revolution."

    The jingling of keys featured in today's Doodle are an important symbol of this movement. Czechs would jingle their keys during protests to represent the unlocking of new doors and a hopeful future as political parties changed.

    Celebrations today are spread throughout the Czech Republic, with the red, blue, and white of the Czech flag flying proudly. If you find yourself in Prague, the country’s capital, you can be part of the celebrations with parades, music, and candle-lighting ceremonies. ​

    Happy National Day of Freedom to the Czech Republic!

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    17 November 2017

    Rachel de Queiroz’s 107th Birthday




    Rachel de Queiroz was a prominent Brazilian writer and the first woman to join the country's Academy of Letters.

    Her first book, O Quinze [Fifteen], was published in 1930 when she was only 20 years old, and brought her instant fame. Her portrayal of the daily struggle of the people of Northeastern Brazil against drought and scarce resources cemented her reputation as a powerful storyteller. Over the next 70 years, Queiroz would go on to write over 2000 chronicles, expanding from literature into journalism, playwriting, and translation.

    Today’s Doodle celebrates Queiroz on what would have been her 107th birthday for her contribution to Brazilian literature and for paving the way for women authors after her.

    Feliz Aniversário, Rachel de Queiroz!

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    17 November 2016

    Elisabeth "Ellis" Kaut's 96th Birthday




    Who's that little goblin lighting the birthday cake? The impish Pumuckl, created by Elisabeth "Ellis" Kaut, has been playfully causing mischief since 1962. Pumuckl is a kobold, a kind of sprite based in German folklore. He constantly gets into trouble but never intends any real harm. Kaut, who would be 96 today, wrote more than 100 Pumuckl stories. She received several awards and honors for her work, including the prestigious Bavarian Poetentaler literary award.

    Today's Doodle was created by Barbara von Johnson, who became the primary Pumuckl illustrator in Kaut's books after winning a competition at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts in 1963.

    Here are some of Mrs. von Johnson’s early sketch ideas for how Pumuckl could have celebrated Ellis Kaut’s birthday:



    In this sketch, Pumuckl appears around a birthday candle with seven different expressions.




    In true kobold spirit, Pumuckl plays with the Google letters as if they were gymnastics equipment.


    Pumuckl opens a Google curtain to present a birthday cake, carefully balanced over his head.


    Pumuckl and his friend, master carpenter Eder, celebrate with a cake and several wrapped gifts.


    Pumuckl lights an L-shaped birthday candle in honor of the author.


    Pumuckl lights a candle on top of a birthday cake amidst several wrapped presents.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 08:44 AM.

  23. #7073
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    18 Nov 2016

    Morocco National Day 2016




    On November 18th, the people of Morocco celebrate their 61st year of independence from France and Spain. Known as Eid Al Istiqulal, celebrations for this day will commence at the imperial palace in Rabat with a grand reception and address. Outside of the city, festivals and parades take place across the country commemorating the nation’s independence with art, music, and traditional street foods like tagine, pastillas, and stuffed sardines.

    Happy National Day, Morocco!

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    18 Nov 2016

    James Welch's 76th Birthday




    Today’s Doodle by artist Sophie Diao pays tribute to James Welch, the Blackfeet writer, on what would be his 76th birthday. Through his novels, documentary film, and poems, Welch gave voice to the struggles and humanity of the Native American experience in the United States.

    Thirty years ago, Welch published his best known work, Fools Crow, the story of the Blackfeet people during the period of post-civil war encroachment by Europeans. In this award-winning novel, the Blackfeet seek to continue traditional ways, and to avoid both contact and conflict. As a whole, Welch’s works emphasized the humanity of native peoples and their deep attachment to their homelands. He was considered an early part of what was later dubbed the Native American Renaissance, during which native writers celebrated tribal culture and revealed its complex problems in works readily accessible to the larger American public.

    Welch, who as a young man described himself as an "Indian who writes," gained an international audience. His works were appreciated universally for both their artistic appeal and ability to bring the experiences of the Native American people to life.

    Here’s to James -- thank you for your contributions!
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 08:52 AM.

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    26 April 2018

    Fanny Blankers-Koen’s 100th Birthday






    On a rainy summer day in 1948, onlookers at London’s Wembley track saw an unexpected athlete make history. Dutch runner and 30-year-old mother of two Fanny Blankers-Koen outstrided her opponents in the women’s 200m by 0.7 seconds—the highest margin in Olympics 200m history and a record that still stands today.

    Born near Baarn, the Netherlands, in 1918, Blankers-Koen had set a national record for the women’s 800m by age 17. At 18, she competed in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, placing fifth in the 4x100m and sixth in high jump.

    After the 1940 and 1944 Olympics were canceled, many thought Blankers-Koen would never make another Olympics. When she declared her intentions to compete in the 1948 London Games, she received letters from many criticizing her for continuing to race despite being a mother and insisting she stay home.

    But words couldn’t break Blankers-Koen’s stride. She captured four golds during the 1948 London Games, winning the 100m, 80m hurdles, 200m, and 4x100m relay to become the first woman to win four medals in a single Olympics. Her quick feet didn’t just set records. Blankers-Koen’s accomplishments flattened stereotypes of female athletes at the time, earning her the nickname “The Flying Housewife.”

    Today, we celebrate what would’ve been her 100th birthday with a Doodle that imagines her racing down the track, smiling mid-stride.


    Happy birthday, Fanny!

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    26 April 2017

    Cassini Spacecraft Dives Between Saturn and its Rings!






    Saturn, get ready for your close-up! Today the Cassini spacecraft starts a series of swoops between Saturn and its rings. These cosmic acrobatics are part of Cassini's dramatic "Grand Finale," a set of orbits offering Earthlings an unprecedented look at the second largest planet in our solar system.

    By plunging into this fascinating frontier, Cassini will help scientists learn more about the origins, mass, and age of Saturn's rings, as well as the mysteries of the gas giant's interior. And of course there will be breathtaking additions to Cassini's already stunning photo gallery. Cassini recently revealed some secrets of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus -- including conditions friendly to life! Who knows what marvels this hardy explorer will uncover in the final chapter of its mission?

    Cassini is a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency [ESA], and the Italian space agency [ASI]. The spacecraft began its 2.2 billion–mile journey 20 years ago and has been hanging out with Saturn since 2004. Later this year, Cassini will say goodbye and become part of Saturn when it crashes through the planet’s atmosphere. But first, it has some spectacular sightseeing to do!

    NASA's Grand Finale toolkit lets you dive into the gap right along with Cassini. Enjoy the show!

    Doodle by Nate Swinehart

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    27 April 2012

    Theo Angelopoulos' 77th Birthday





    Theodoros "Theo" Angelopoulos was a Greek filmmaker, screenwriter and film producer.

    He dominated the Greek art film industry from 1975 on. Angelopoulos was one of the most influential and widely respected filmmakers in the world. He started making films in 1967. In the 1970s he made a series of political films about modern Greece.

    Angelopoulos' films, described by Martin Scorsese as that of "a masterful filmmaker", are characterized by the slightest movement, slightest change in distance, long takes, and complex, carefully composed scenes. His cinematic method is often described as "sweeping" and "hypnotic."

    In 1998 his film Eternity and a Day went on to win the Palme d'Or at the 51st edition of the Cannes Film Festival, and his films have been shown at many of the world's esteemed film festivals.

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    27 April 2009

    Samuel Morse's Birthday




    Samuel Finley Breese Morse [April 27, 1791 – April 2, 1872] was an American inventor and painter. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.

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    20 May 2009

    Scientists unveil fossil of Darwinius masillae





    Darwinius is a genus within the infraorder Adapiformes, a group of basal strepsirrhine primates from the middle Eocene epoch. Its only known species, Darwinius masillae, lived approximately 47 million years ago [Lutetian stage] based on dating of the fossil site.

    The only known fossil, called Ida, was discovered in 1983 at the Messel pit, a disused quarry near the village of Messel, about 35 km [22 mi] southeast of Frankfurt, Germany. The fossil, divided into a slab and partial counterslab after the amateur excavation and sold separately, was not reassembled until 2007. The fossil is of a juvenile female, approximately 58 cm [23 in] overall length, with the head and body length excluding the tail being about 24 cm [9.4 in]. It is estimated that Ida died at about 80–85% of her projected adult body and limb length.

    The genus Darwinius was named in commemoration of the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Darwin, and the species name masillae honors Messel where the specimen was found. The creature appeared superficially similar to a modern lemur.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 03:00 PM.

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    22 May 2009

    Mary Cassatt's Birthday





    Mary Stevenson Cassatt was an American painter and printmaker. She was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania [now part of Pittsburgh's North Side], but lived much of her adult life in France where she befriended Edgar Degas and exhibited with the Impressionists. Cassatt often created images of the social and private lives of women, with particular emphasis on the intimate bonds between mothers and children.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 03:06 PM.

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    17 Jun 2009

    Igor Stravinsky's Birthday




    Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky was a Russian composer, pianist and conductor, later of French [from 1934] and American [from 1945] citizenship. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century.

    Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Sergei Diaghilev and first performed in Paris by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes: The Firebird [1910], Petrushka [1911], and The Rite of Spring [1913]. The last transformed the way in which subsequent composers thought about rhythmic structure and was largely responsible for Stravinsky's enduring reputation as a revolutionary who pushed the boundaries of musical design. His "Russian phase", which continued with works such as Renard, L'Histoire du soldat, and Les noces, was followed in the 1920s by a period in which he turned to neoclassicism. The works from this period tended to make use of traditional musical forms [concerto grosso, fugue, and symphony] and drew from earlier styles, especially those of the 18th century. In the 1950s, Stravinsky adopted serial procedures. His compositions of this period shared traits with examples of his earlier output: rhythmic energy, the construction of extended melodic ideas out of a few two- or three-note cells, and clarity of form and instrumentation.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-29-2021 at 03:14 PM.

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    17 June 2017

    Susan La Flesche Picotte’s 152nd Birthday






    Today’s Doodle honors the life and legacy of Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte [[1865-1915), the first American Indian to earn a medical degree.


    Picotte grew up in Nebraska on the Omaha reservation, where her father urged her to “be somebody in the world.” She left her village and made her way east, eventually attending the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania [featured in today’s Doodle on the left], where she graduated at the top of her class. Despite receiving numerous prestigious job offers, Picotte chose to return to the reservation to provide the medical care that her tribe badly needed – tending to patients across 1,350 square miles on foot and horseback, in wind, snow, and rain.

    Picotte was also a fierce public health advocate and social reformer. She promoted life-saving hygiene practices, such as the elimination of communal drinking cups and the installation of screen doors to keep out disease-carrying insects. Most notably, in 1913, she personally raised the funds to build a modern hospital in her hometown, which you can see pictured to the right of today’s Doodle.

    Picotte’s remarkable career as a physician and health advocate just scratches the surface of her legacy. She was more than the reservation’s doctor – she was also an advisor, confidant, and symbol of hope for the Omaha.

    Happy 152nd birthday to “Dr. Sue,” as her patients called her – a true American heroine.

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    17 June 2013

    Henry Lawson's 146th Birthday








    Henry Archibald Hertzberg Lawson was an Australian writer and bush poet. Along with his contemporary Banjo Paterson, Lawson is among the best-known Australian poets and fiction writers of the colonial period and is often called Australia's "greatest short story writer".

    A bronze statue of Lawson accompanied by a swagman, a dog and a fencepost [[reflecting his writing) stands in The Domain, Sydney. The Henry Lawson Memorial committee raised money through public donation to commission the statue by sculptor George Washington Lambert in 1927. The work was unveiled on 28 July 1931 by the Governor of New South Wales, Sir Philip Game.
    In 1949 Lawson was the subject of an Australian postage stamp.

    Henry Lawson's The Drover's Wife short story was featured on a 1991 $1.20 stamp, and a 2017 $1.00 stamp, both from Australia Post.

    In 2017 Lawson was again featured on two Australian postage stamps, one featuring Mitchell: A Character Sketch and the other The Drover's Wife and family, including dog, pitted against the snake.

    He was featured on the first [[paper Australian ten-dollar note issued in 1966 when decimal currency was first introduced into Australia. Lawson was pictured against scenes from the town of Gulgong in NSW. This note was replaced by a polymer note in 1993; the polymer series had different people featured on the notes.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-30-2021 at 07:23 AM.

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    17 June 2019

    Jeong Ji-yong’s 117th Birthday








    Today marks the 117th birthday of Jeong Ji-yong, a writer, translator, and teacher whose work experienced a resurgence in the late 1980s and who is now widely considered a pioneer of modern Korean poetry. The Doodle was created by Seoul-based guest artist, Mikyung Lee.

    Born in the village of Hagye-ri in Okcheon county, Chungcheong Province on this day in 1902, Jeong Ji-yong grew up during the Japanese occupation of Korea. He published his first poem in 1919 and then traveled to Japan to study English at Doshisha University, writing his thesis on the British artist and poet William Blake.

    As a Korean living in a different country, his poetry from this period expressed a sense of longing for home. Among his best-loved poems is 향수, or “Nostalgia,” published in 1923. Adapted into a song, it has become popular on Korean radio, evoking memories of life in a country village, punctuated with the haunting refrain: “Could it ever be forgotten, even in one's dreams?”

    Renowned for his powerful imagery and simple yet evocative verse, Jeong Ji-yong continued publishing poetry and teaching high school English at his alma mater—and later at Ewha Women's University—until his unexplained disappearance around 1950. The Jeong Jiyong Literature Prize was established in 1989 to recognize emerging writers and keep his legacy alive.

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    17 Jun 2019

    İlhan Koman’s 98th Birthday





    “Can science and art meet in one place?” asked Turkish artist İlhan Koman, born in Edirne on this day in 1921. “I'm trying to realize this meeting in sculpture… I'm trying to create new forms.”

    Today’s Doodle celebrates the multidisciplinary sculptor whose wide-ranging interests and endless experimentation with various media and techniques, as well as mathematical concepts, led some to call him the “Leonardo Da Vinci of Turkey.”

    As a child, Koman enjoyed playing with bolts and screws, and spent hours at a local blacksmith’s shop, watching the craftsman work with metal. When visiting relatives in the seaside city of Istanbul, he made models of ferry boats in the harbor and planned to become a shipbuilder before deciding to go to art school.

    Upon graduating from Istanbul’s Art Academy, he moved to Paris, where he studied during the 1940s, opened a workshop, exhibited his own abstract sculpture, and spent hours in the Louvre admiring the ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian art and the work of modern masters such as Rodin, Brancusi, and Giacometti.

    While representing Turkey in the 1958 Brussels World's Fair, he met the architect Ralph Erskine, who invited him to work in Sweden. It was there that Koman would also teach at Stockholm’s Konstfack School of Applied Art. In the 1960s, he bought a two-masted wooden sailboat called the Hulda, which he adapted into a studio and living space.

    During his time in Sweden, Koman began what he called his ‘Iron Age,’ exploring the malleability of metal. He created many public works, the best known of which is the monumental sculpture Akdeniz in Istanbul. The 4.5 ton figure of a woman with outstretched arms was fashioned from 112 strips of metal.

    Doğum günün kutlu olsun, İlhan!

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    17 June 2016

    Adile Naşit’s 86th birthday





    Today we celebrate Turkish actress Adile Naşit, who is remembered fondly as “the funny lady.” Naşit starred in the important Turkish films Neşeli Günler and Hababam Sınıfı [The Chaos Class] alongside her frequent co-star, Münir Özkul. She is best remembered for reading bedtime stories to the children of Turkey through her children’s program, Uykudan Önce or “Before Sleep.” On what would have been her 86th birthday, we remember Naşit and her infectious laugh.

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    20 Jun 2016

    45th Anniversary of The First Broadcast of El Chavo del Ocho




    El Chavo made his TV debut 45 years ago today, marking the beginning of a beloved TV institution in Mexico, parts of the United States, and in many other countries in Latin America. At the height of its popularity, El Chavo del Ocho was the most-watched show on Mexican television. The show’s courageous orphan and his friends got themselves into and out of trouble, all the while endearing themselves to generations of fans. Tens of millions of viewers still watch the animated version of the show, El Chavo Animado, every day.

    Today’s Doodle pays tribute to the creation by Roberto Gómez Bolańos. Thank you, Chesperito, for forty-five years of laughs.

  38. #7088
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    20 June 2014

    Ilan Ramon's 60th Birthday






    Ilan Ramon was an Israeli fighter pilot and later the first Israeli astronaut. Ramon was a Space Shuttle payload specialist of STS-107, the fatal mission of Columbia, in which he and six other crew members were killed in the re-entry accident. At 48, he was the oldest member of the crew. Ramon is the only foreign recipient of the United States Congressional Space Medal of Honor, which he was awarded posthumously.

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    15 March 2017

    140th Anniversary of the First Cricket Test Match





    The first officially-recognized test cricket match took place 140 years ago today. It was a contest between the established English side and the newly-formed Australian team. Australia won the first match, but England won the second match to draw the series 1:1. The rivalry between the English and Australian teams, forged on the field, endures to this day.

    Today’s Doodle hits the deck with a lighthearted rendering that captures the spirit of sportsmanship and the inaugural test match. Mustachioed and musclebound, the batsmen, bowlers and opposition fielders spring into action, never losing sight of the red ball.

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    15 March 2019

    Hungarian National Day 2019




    Today’s Doodle celebrates Hungarian National Day, also known as Nemzeti ünnep or the anniversary of the revolution and fight for independence in 1848-1849.

    During that time, as a wave of revolutionary reforms spread across Europe, heated discussions amongst artists and writers in Budapest cafes boiled over. A young poet named Sándor Petőfi helped draft the famous 12 Points outlining their demands from the Austrian Empire, including freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and an independent parliament. These were printed, distributed, and read aloud that day along with Petőfi’s national song, stirring strong feelings of national pride that led to a declaration of independence and revolution. Although the revolution was later put down, it ushered in some lasting reforms—including Europe’s first law protecting minority rights—and set the template for modern Hungary’s parliamentary government.

    National Day commemorations begin with the raising of Hungary’s red, white, and green flag on Kossuth Square. Many proud Hungarians wear a rosette with the national colors while attending concerts and cultural events for families at landmarks like Buda Castle. Wreaths are laid at memorials to revolutionary war heroes like Count Lajos Batthyány, the first Prime Minister of Hungary, and Petőfi, whose rousing words inspired it all.

    Happy National Day, Hungary!

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    15 March 2013

    Hungary National Day 2013



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    15 March 2015

    Hungary National Day 2015




  43. #7093
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    16 Mar 2015

    Anna Atkins' 216th Birthday





    Our doodle in the U.S. and the U.K. marks the 216th Birthday of English photographer and botanist Anna Atkins. Considered the first person to publish a book illustrated with photographs, Atkins is also credited with being the first to use cyanotype, a printing process the uses cyan-blue print, for photography.

  44. #7094
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    16 March 2012

    Cesar Vallejo's 120th Birthday





    César Abraham Vallejo Mendoza was a Peruvian poet, writer, playwright, and journalist. Although he published only two books of poetry during his lifetime, he is considered one of the great poetic innovators of the 20th century in any language. He was always a step ahead of literary currents, and each of his books was distinct from the others, and, in its own sense, revolutionary. Thomas Merton called him "the greatest universal poet since Dante". The late British poet, critic and biographer Martin Seymour-Smith, a leading authority on world literature, called Vallejo "the greatest twentieth-century poet in any language." He was a member of the intellectual community called North Group formed in the Peruvian north coastal city of Trujillo.

    Clayton Eshleman and José Rubia Barcia's translation of The Complete Posthumous Poetry of César Vallejo won the National Book Award for translation in 1979.

  45. #7095
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    20 May 2018

    Celebrating Abraham Ortelius





    Long before we were able to map the world and put it online, Abraham Ortelius made a lasting impact by collecting the latest information from scientists, geographers, and cartographers and transforming it into what the world now knows as the modern day atlas.

    The atlas, titled Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [Theatre of the World], was first published on this day in 1570 and is significant for a couple reasons. Within these pages, we see the first evidence of someone imagining continental drift - the theory that continents were joined together before drifting apart to their present day positions. Flipping through the pages, you may also notice a sea monster or two in the water - these mythical creatures were a subject of fascination in Ortelius’ generation, and often appeared alongside the ever changing landscapes of the atlas maps.

    As every atlas is an aggregation of many maps, Ortelius was also one of the first cartographers to consistently add sources and names to the creators of the original maps, as evidenced by the first map pictured in today’s animated Doodle. Adding his fellow scientists’ names to the atlas wasn’t just a professional courtesy - Ortelius was known for corresponding with prominent scientists and humanists from all over Europe, a practice that yielded much insight into the great thinkers of his time.

    Here’s to Abraham Ortelius, whose cartographic innovation helped give all a truly global view.

  46. #7096
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    20 May 2018

    Sam Selvon’s 95th Birthday






    Today we celebrate the 95th birthday of novelist, poet, and playwright, Sam Selvon. Born to humble beginnings in rural south Trinidad in 1923, his East Indian heritage and West Indian upbringing would greatly shape his future identity as a writer.

    Selvon started writing during his spare time while working in the oilfields, serving in the Royal Naval reserve, and writing for newspapers and literary magazines. In his early twenties, he wrote and published several short stories and poems in his native Trinidad. However, it was his move to England in 1950 which set the stage for his career to blossom.

    Drawing from his personal experiences as an immigrant, Selvon published his pioneering novel “The Lonely Londoners” in 1956. In it, he gave the unique Caribbean creolised English, or "nation language", a narrative voice of its own on an international stage. “The Lonely Londoners” was later followed by two more London-based novels: “Moses Ascending” [1975] and “Moses Migrating” [1983], both of which continued the saga of Caribbean immigrants and their experiences in London.

    Today’s Doodle by guest artist Jayesh Sivan depicts Selvon and other members of the Caribbean migrant community set against the backdrop of London, which served as the inspiration and setting for much of his works.

    Happy birthday, Sam Selvon!

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    20 May 2011

    Emile Berliner's 160th Birthday





    Emile Berliner, was a German-American inventor. He is best known for inventing the lateral-cut flat disc record [called a "gramophone record" in British and American English] used with a gramophone. He founded the United States Gramophone Company in 1894; The Gramophone Company in London, England, in 1897; Deutsche Grammophon in Hanover, Germany, in 1898; Berliner Gram-o-phone Company of Canada in Montreal in 1899 [chartered in 1904]; and Victor Talking Machine Company in 1901 with Eldridge Johnson.

  48. #7098
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    1 December 2018

    Maria Walanda Maramis’ 146th Birthday








    Today’s Doodle honors Maria Walanda Maramis, a National Hero of Indonesia who fought tirelessly for the advancement of women in her home country at the beginning of the 20th century.

    Born in a small village in North Minahasa Regency on this day in 1872, Maramis was the youngest of three children. Orphaned at an early age, she was raised by an uncle along with her siblings. Maramis and her sister were offered only basic schooling because of their gender.

    After moving to Manado, the capital city of North Sulawesi province, she began writing an op-ed column in a local newspaper, Tjahaja Siang. Her writings emphasized the importance of mothers as caretakers of their family’s well-being, health care, and education.

    Based on these principles, she founded the organization PIKAT, an Indonesian acronym for “Percintaan Ibu Kepada Anak Turunannya,” which translates as “The Love of a Mother Toward her Children.” PIKAT members learned essential household skills like cooking and sewing and caring for their children’s health. The organization expanded as far away as to Java where local women organized their own branches.

    Turning her attention to politics, Maramis fought for women’s right to vote in choosing their representatives. Her efforts paid off in 1921 when the government allowed women to participate in elections. PIKAT’s work went on, aided by Maramis’ daughter Anna Matuli Walanda.

    In 1969, in appreciation of her accomplishments on behalf of Indonesian women, the government decreed Maramis a National Hero. Her work towards the emancipation of women is celebrated on her birthday and a statue stands in her honor in the village of Komo Luar.

    Happy Birthday, Maria Walanda Maramis!
    Last edited by 9A; 09-30-2021 at 06:45 PM.

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    4 Dec 2016

    Dewi Sartika’s 132nd Birthday




    Today’s Doodle celebrates Dewi Sartika, a leader in women’s education in Indonesia during the late 1800s and early 1900s. At just 18 years old, Sartika started teaching women in a small room in the back of a house. Two years later, she opened the first school for women in Indonesia, and over the next ten years expanded her reach to ten schools.

    She was awarded National Heroine by the Indonesian government in 1966 for her positive influence and public service to women across Indonesia.

    Happy 132nd birthday to this educational trailblazer!

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    4 December 2018
    Edith Cavell’s 153rd Birthday






    Today’s Doodle celebrates Edith Cavell, a British nurse who risked her life to help hundreds of British and French soldiers escape from occupied Belgium during World War I.

    On this day in 1865, Cavell was born in Swardenton, a village near Norwich. Caring for her aged father during a serious illness inspired her to become a nurse at age 30, and she began her training with Matron Eva Lückes, a friend of Florence Nightingale, at the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel. She went on to work at hospitals in Shoreditch, Kings Cross, and Manchester before being invited to Brussels to lead a new training hospital for nurses. Considered a pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium, she founded the medical journal l’infirmičre in 1910.

    Visiting family when the war broke out, she returned to Brussels straightaway, where she would treat all casualties of war regardless of their nationality. "I can’t stop while there are lives to be saved,” she stated.

    Besides her work as a nurse, Cavell became involved with an underground group that was sheltering French and British soldiers and helping them escape from occupied Belgium. In August 1915, after helping some 200 men, Cavell was arrested and charged with treason. She confessed to the military court and, despite widespread appeals for mercy, was executed on October 12, 1915.

    In 1917, the Nation’s Fund for Nurses was launched in her honor to raise funds to assist those who “sought the health of others at the expense of her own.” The fund was later renamed the Cavell Nurses’ Trust.

    Here’s to Edith Cavell, whose legacy of heroism and compassion continues on.

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