[REMOVE ADS]




Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1

    Question Kim Weston; The Velvelettes - Did Motown Ever Schedule Albums For Them?

    I was just reading the liner notes for The Velvelettes - The Motown Anthology and it mentioned that Motown never issued an album for The Velvelettes. Did Motown ever intend to release an album of their work in the 1960s? Same question regarding Kim Weston.

  2. #2
    Name:  av-5.jpg
Views: 581
Size:  21.1 KB
    None were scheduled, nor slated that I know of, and I saw many, many schedules and list of slated (but not yet scheduled) releases, when I worked there during the '70s; and even before, during the 1960s. And I also saw several mock-ups for LPs that were never produced - on Marv Johnson('65), Mary Wells('64-Jazz), The Four Tops('63-Jazz). I did hear some insiders talk about the possibility of both getting LPs assigned, eventually in late '63 and early '64'. But the situation changed when The Supremes, Four Tops, AND The Temptations all became so very big in mid 1964, that the secondary artists just got dropped another rung so that Motown's management and publicity could concentrate on taking advantage of that situation.
    Last edited by robb_k; 02-29-2020 at 11:11 PM.

  3. Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    Name:  av-5.jpg
Views: 581
Size:  21.1 KB
    But the situation changed when The Supremes, Four Tops, AND The Temptations all became so very big in mid 1964, that the secondary artists just got dropped another rung so that Motown's management and publicity could concentrate on taking advantage of that situation.
    Like lightning to read those words. Forever, I'd hear and read that the reason so many at Motown failed to be promoted was because of The Supremes. I bought into that because it made sense. The Supremes hit big with "Where Did Our Love Go" and the public went for that song and the group in a way that had nothing to do with promotion alone. So I could see that of course, you have to strike while the iron is hot. Then, I recall reading somewhere about how Motown was still a relatively small company at that time, so the Supremes' constant success just threw a wrench in the works, so the plan to focus on this act, then that act and so on more or less got put on the rear burner.

    However, the more I've come to understand and appreciate Motown, the more I see that 1964 really was the critical year that set Motown on its course. At one point I had even done a sort of write up for something or other that spoke to that. Motown was searching for that sound and identity and trying with as many artists as possible. Then, it was like all of a sudden, several acts that had been simmering broke wide. Yes, it wasn't just the Supremes, but even Brenda Holloway broke through with "Every Little Bit Hurts." She, The Four Tops, Temptations, Supremes were suddenly doing well while it seemed Marvin Gaye was in somewhat of a slump, Little Stevie Wonder hadn't found his groove, The Marvelettes had slipped and even the Miracles seemed to hit a slump at that time. With Mary Wells, Motown had to go with stoking the fires set by The Tempts, Tops, Brenda and Supremes. Then, all of a sudden, '65 came and The Miracles took off again and The Supremes, well you can't buy that kind of audience acceptance by sheer promotion alone.

    In that light, I can now better understand how and why Tommy Good, Kim Weston, The Velvelettes, Carolyn Crawford and even the MOR artist got more or less placed on indefinite hold.

  4. #4
    Yeah WaitingWatching, I too can understand why, but it is a shame. Although most have since received great anthology albums!!!!

  5. Quote Originally Posted by TomatoTom123 View Post
    Yeah WaitingWatching, I too can understand why, but it is a shame. Although most have since received great anthology albums!!!!
    Yes, I do like that those anthologies have been made available! Having those is like going above and beyond my wildest Motown dream!

  6. #6
    Not Motown records releases, but each had 1 complete LP released on Ian Levine's "Motorcity" label..."Heartaches"- Carolyn Crawford....."One Door Closes" -the Velvelettes ."Investigate"- Kim Weston all are vinyl and at the current moment listed for sale on ebay, (along with the Marvelettes "NOW")...all feature songs newly composed (at the time of recording) and various reworkings of songs recorded originally for Motown. I have a few of these Motorcity LPS and comp. CD's....I enjoy them.
    Last edited by gman; 03-02-2020 at 03:27 AM.

  7. #7
    The Velvelettes' album was actually quite good. The Marvelettes', as much as I adored them in the day, was dreadful. I don't think I have any of the others. Some of the compilations were pretty good and Martha did some decent stuff, such as Step Into My Shoes. I find it interesting that Ian never did an album on them, since they were the more popular of the three groups.

  8. #8
    Didn’t Martha have a falling out with Ian?

  9. #9
    seems like many did...I know Liz Lands did and told it in a interview....he made a hefty personal investment in the big schemed transatlantic project...he has comments on his youtube videos channel that are pretty revealing....apparently, the at the time general publics appetite for obscure and even once popular Motown acts was way over estimated, and on top of that there were various international label distribution problems. The US Motown fans like me who were able to find some of the 12" singles and the UK diehard Northern Soul fans alone weren't able to support the expense of such a massive venture...some cuts got club play, but Frances Nero was the only one to secure a modest chart placing with FOOTSTEPS FOLLOWING ME...seems many artists got their advance $, recorded tracks, and then became unavailable to promote and complained when further monies weren't forthcoming. A lot of what was recorded only became available after the label folded on compilation CD collections.

  10. #10
    There were some excellent tracks from Levine and co at the time. Levine was indeed a successful producer and, for example, along with Billy Griffin produced a few big hits on other artists such as Take That. Best of all was the opportunity to see many of those former Motown acts live.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mysterysinger View Post
    There were some excellent tracks from Levine and co at the time. Levine was indeed a successful producer and, for example, along with Billy Griffin produced a few big hits on other artists such as Take That. Best of all was the opportunity to see many of those former Motown acts live.
    Ian invested his funds from successful HiNRG Radio Shack 12" dance club hits into the Motorcity project. He had a huge mega hit with Evelyn Thomas HIGH ENERGY

    Many Ian tracks are overall very good...you just have to get used to keyboard generated drums, strings and overall instrumentation. The vocal talents were still enjoyable...the entire project got too big, too fast and zapping up everyone he could locate still in Detroit, LA and the UK most likely zapped the budget and incoming cash

    Outside of the Motown talent stable, there are a overwhelming amount of vintage/oldies acts that were given opportunities by small labels to record again on small budgets, and this mode of orchestration seemed to be the norm.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

[REMOVE ADS]

Ralph Terrana
MODERATOR

Welcome to Soulful Detroit! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
Soulful Detroit is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to Soulful Detroit. [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.