[REMOVE ADS]




Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 51 to 97 of 97
  1. #51

  2. #52
    Amazing what a remix can do lol

    Go Diana!

    Would be great for ANME to get a #1 dance berth, then that would mean the song became #1 in four different charts!

  3. #53
    Congratulations Diana Ross. "Ain't no mountain High enough". Is now #1 on Billboards dance club charts.

  4. #54
    Congratulations, Diana! Perfect way to start the New Year!

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Philles/Motown Gary View Post
    Congratulations, Diana! Perfect way to start the New Year!
    A very rare Motown event these days; I wonder if it will be the last Motown #1 by a classic Motown artist?

  6. #56

  7. #57
    Congratulations Miss Ross! You are The Boss!!

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by jobeterob View Post
    A very rare Motown event these days; I wonder if it will be the last Motown #1 by a classic Motown artist?
    Something tells me someone is gonna remix I Heard It Through the Grapevine (Marvin's) and push it to number one, something the Freemasons were unable to a decade ago.

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Scarlet View Post
    #1! #1! #1!

  10. #60
    Well done Miss Ross another Number 1.

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Roberta75 View Post
    Well done Miss Ross another Number 1.
    What was the last Motown #1?

  12. #62
    Valerie must be proud. This is a tribute to her and Nick, and all of the original production team. Not to mention Diana’s exquisite vocals.
    Last edited by Circa 1824; 01-14-2018 at 06:25 AM.

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Circa 1824 View Post
    Valerie must be proud. This is a tribute to her and Nick, and all of the original production team. Not to mention Diana’s exquisite vocals.
    I am sure she is. She and Nick told me many years ago that ANMHE was one of their proudest moments. It was a tough job to create a totally new slant on an existing classic song.

  14. #64
    perhaps another Diamond Diana track will get a remix thanks to this going to #1

  15. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimi LaLumia View Post
    perhaps another Diamond Diana track will get a remix thanks to this going to #1
    Does it stay #1?

  16. #66

  17. #67
    Diamond Diana requires a vinyl LP release from Motown!

  18. #68
    it's now #1 on the Billboard R&B Albums chart..

  19. #69
    Fan-tastic!!!

  20. #70
    Well, I can attest to selling it really well. When the CD was released 12 Jan, I made my usual way up to Amoeba Music in Hollywood on my off days (Sun-Mon), Sun Jan 14 to check out the new releases. I found that they had at least 25 copies and was prominently displayed. I did not buy it that week because another fav artist of mine had a new release that week as well, Petula Clark. I usually only buy one new release at a time because I have special coupons that get me $3 off a disc, but i can only use one at a time per visit. Since they had more copies of Diana's, figured that I'd pick up next visit. Well, yesterday, made my way back up again, expecting to purchase it. Was shocked to find that they had SOLD OUT. i enquired at the counter and was told that more are on order and would be arriving during the week. Am really happy for Miss Ross that she was another #1 album & single on the charts. Most artists, i prefer to buy a slightly used cd at a discounted price, since I collect so many other artists. Though, my top faves, like Miss Ross, Supremes, Petula Clark, etc., i only buy new.

  21. #71
    In the Wall Street Journal, there is a story today of the evolution of Ain't No Mountain High Enough; I'm not a subscriber so I can't read it but it is a discussion between Valerie Simpson and Mary Wilson it seems to say.

    #1 on the R & B Chart is quite remarkable.

  22. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimi LaLumia View Post
    it's now #1 on the Billboard R&B Albums chart..
    Her first #1 album since 1980.
    On the so-called "main" R&B album chart (R&B/Hip-Hop), it was #18.

    But still a great achievement.

    So let's see:
    #30 Billboard 200
    #18 Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop
    #5 Billboard Album Sales
    #1 R&B Albums

    And a #1 dance hit.

    Only the Queen of Motown.

  23. #73

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by jobeterob View Post
    In the Wall Street Journal, there is a story today of the evolution of Ain't No Mountain High Enough; I'm not a subscriber so I can't read it but it is a discussion between Valerie Simpson and Mary Wilson it seems to say.

    #1 on the R & B Chart is quite remarkable.
    Wilson sticks her face into everything! What would she have to do with ANMHE? Girl can't live a day without talking about Diana Ross! Too funny.
    Last edited by PeaceNHarmony; 01-29-2018 at 10:35 PM.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceNHarmony View Post
    Wilson sticks her face into everything! What would she have to do with ANMHE? Girl can't live a day without talking about Diana Ross! Too funny.
    Wilsons only accomplishment in life has been to stand behind the big star for a few years, and then talk about it for several decades.

  26. #76
    What does the article say? I still can't read it.

  27. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by jobeterob View Post
    What does the article say? I still can't read it.
    The article consists of interviews with Valerie Simpson, Mary Wilson, and arranger Paul Riser.

    Among other things, Val talks about how she and Nick Ashford met, how they came up with AIN'T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH, and details about the recording session for Diana's version, like how she, Ashford and Joshie Armstead did the background vocals, with additional help from the Andantes. She also speaks of how Berry thought it was too long, and wanted them to redo it. They refused, and Berry released REACH OUT AND TOUCH instead. Valerie mentioned that she did do an edit, but DJs were hopping on the album version.

    Paul Riser speaks about arranging the original track for Tammi Terrell before it was decided to add Marvin Gaye's voice.

    Mary speaks of recording the song when the Supremes did it as a duet with the Tempts. She says she doesn't think they ever did it live because it was too intricate.

  28. #78
    I felt Motown still made the mistake of releasing Reach Out FIRST...

    ANMHE was the perfect FIRST SOLO SONG and they messed that up for Diana. But either way, both songs got to be anthems for her and soul music so I'm cool.

  29. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by midnightman View Post
    I felt Motown still made the mistake of releasing Reach Out FIRST...

    ANMHE was the perfect FIRST SOLO SONG and they messed that up for Diana. But either way, both songs got to be anthems for her and soul music so I'm cool.
    I think they were/are both excellent choices; legend has it that Diana was insistent upon ROAT. I see your point about ANMHE being a sort of 'statement song' for a first single, though! I'm glad we have both.

  30. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by jobeterob View Post
    What does the article say? I still can't read it.
    WSJ and their paywall ... Sometimes I'm able to access so if I can I'll copy & paste the full text.

  31. #81
    I recall when I bought her solo debut album when released and heard Ain't No Mountain High Enough I was mesmerized. I listened to it all summer. When I returned to college towards the end of summer I was listening to the radio and the edited, single version was on the air and I hated it because the original was so spectacular. However, it still went to #1 and understand at that time the 3 minute single was how things went. But what an anthem at the time and such a powerful performance!

  32. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by midnightman View Post
    I felt Motown still made the mistake of releasing Reach Out FIRST...

    ANMHE was the perfect FIRST SOLO SONG and they messed that up for Diana. But either way, both songs got to be anthems for her and soul music so I'm cool.
    I don't think it was a mistake, but it is interesting to ponder what releasing Mountain first would have done for the momentum of her solo career. My final thought might be that it wouldn't have changed things much if the follow up singles were still the same.

  33. #83
    Hi eveyone,
    I have a friend who subscribes to the online version of The Wall Street Journal. She sent me the PDF. Here's the piece on "Ain't No Mountain High Enough."

    ANATOMY OF A SONG By Marc Myers
    The Story Behind ‘Ain’t NoMountain High Enough’
    How a walk down Central Park West inspired the love song that Diana Ross took to the top of the charts
    By Marc Myers
    Jan. 29, 2018 9:22 a.m. ET
    (From: The Wall Street Journal - January 29, 2018)

    WHEN “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” was released by Tammi Terrell and Marvin Gaye in 1967, the single peaked at No. 19 on Billboard’s pop chart. Then in 1970, after Diana Ross left the Supremes, her version of the song went to No. 1. Valerie Simpson, the song’s cowriter, Motown arranger Paul Riser, guitarist Eddie Willis, and the Supremes’ Mary Wilson recently looked back on the song’s evolution. Motown/UMe in November released “Diamond Diana,” an album of remastered Diana Ross singles that includes a remix of the song.
    Edited from interviews:

    Valerie Simpson: I first met Nick Ashford in church in 1962. He had just graduated from high school in Michigan and came to New York to be a dancer. But his auditions didn’t work out, and he wound up homeless. He was staying at a friend’s apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. I was still a senior in high school then and sang in the choir at the White Rock Baptist Church in Harlem. I also sang in the Followers, a gospel vocal group. One day, I saw Nick standing in the back of our church as we sang. He was there looking for a hot meal. After we were introduced by his friend, I talked him into joining the Followers. In early ’63, the Followers performed at Sweet Chariot on West 46th Street. We had a nice run there until May, when the gospel club was picketed by a Harlem church. The minister felt gospel had no place in a club. The experience informed Nick and me to stick together as songwriters. Nick was the perfect mouthpiece for my melodies, and my piano inspired his lyrics.

    Our first hit, “Let’s Go Get Stoned,” was written with Joshie Armstead for the Coasters in 1965. Ray Charles recorded the song a year later and had a No. 1 R&B hit. The song’s success brought us to the attention of songwriter Eddie Holland at Motown. To do well there, Nick and I knew we needed a great song. Nick told me about lyrics he had written while walking down Central Park West. During his walk, he worried about whether he’d be able to remain in the city. That’s when he noticed that the buildings along the park looked like mountains. Words came to him: “Ain’t no mountain high enough / Ain’t no valley low enough / Ain’t no river wide enough / to keep me from getting to you.” The “you” here meant success. I loved the lines, and we used them to write a love song. When we were done, we recorded a demo with me on piano and Nick singing. Motown loved it and wanted the song for singer Tammi Terrell. She hadn’t had a big hit yet.

    Paul Riser: The first thing I did was record the rhythm track with the Funk Brothers, the label’s house band. After Tammi recorded her vocal, the producers decided the single would be stronger as a duet. Months earlier, Marvin had a hit with Kim Weston on “It Takes Two.” So Marvin was added to Tammi’s record to help its odds on the charts. Marvin was amazing. He overdubbed his vocal so it wrapped around hers, as if the two of them were in love, singing to each other in the studio.

    Mary Wilson: Tammi had a great record with “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” But in October ‘67, she collapsed on stage while performing with Marvin. Doctors later diagnosed she had a brain tumor, which kept her from touring. The following spring, the Supremes—Diana Ross, me and Cindy Birdsong, who had replaced Florence Ballard months earlier—recorded “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” for a duet album with the Temptations.

    Ms. Simpson: When Diana left the Supremes in the fall of ’69, (Motown founder) Berry Gordy asked Nick and me to produce her first album. Nick suggested we have Diana narrate an extended verse. He thought she had a great speaking voice, so he wrote new lyrics. I created an introduction that began as an instrumental and led into a choir that set up Diana’s spoken voice.

    Mr. Riser: Since the chorus didn’t come until late, I wanted the choir in the introduction to sing the chorus as “Ahhhs.” This worked like a Broadway musical overture, teasing what was coming later in the song.

    Ms. Simpson: When we began to record, we did the rhythm track first at Motown. I played piano with the Funk Brothers. That’s me on the record throughout.

    Eddie Willis: Valerie’s piano was coldblooded. Man, she could really play.

    Ms. Simpson: After New York, we overdubbed the choir parts and background vocals at Motown. When all of the music and background vocals were on tape, we had Diana come in to record her vocal. I wanted everything done so she’d hear all of it in her headset. We really got the best out of her. Producing is about getting something special out of an artist. We stretched Diana. She could do it, and she didn’t mind going for it. But when we gave the song’s final 6:18 mix to Berry, he felt it took too long to get to the chorus. Nick said to Berry, “It’s like an orgasm. You don’t have it immediately. It builds.” Berry insisted we at least cut it down for the single. Eventually I edited the song down to 3:32 so we could get it out. But many radio DJs played the album version instead. Nick and I felt vindicated. In the years that followed, something happened between Nick and myself. I’ll just say that when you’re writing love songs all day long with someone, you can wind up falling in love. We did. Nick and I married in 1974.


    ANATOMY OF A SONG By Marc Myers
    The Wall Street Journal - January 30, 2018

  34. #84
    Well it's a story in itself that they managed to take it back to #1 on the Dance Chart in 2018.

  35. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by dylan View Post
    Hi eveyone,
    I have a friend who subscribes to the online version of The Wall Street Journal. She sent me the PDF. Here's the piece on "Ain't No Mountain High Enough."

    ANATOMY OF A SONG By Marc Myers
    The Story Behind ‘Ain’t NoMountain High Enough’
    How a walk down Central Park West inspired the love song that Diana Ross took to the top of the charts
    By Marc Myers
    Jan. 29, 2018 9:22 a.m. ET
    (From: The Wall Street Journal - January 29, 2018)

    WHEN “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” was released by Tammi Terrell and Marvin Gaye in 1967, the single peaked at No. 19 on Billboard’s pop chart. Then in 1970, after Diana Ross left the Supremes, her version of the song went to No. 1. Valerie Simpson, the song’s cowriter, Motown arranger Paul Riser, guitarist Eddie Willis, and the Supremes’ Mary Wilson recently looked back on the song’s evolution. Motown/UMe in November released “Diamond Diana,” an album of remastered Diana Ross singles that includes a remix of the song.
    Edited from interviews:

    Valerie Simpson: I first met Nick Ashford in church in 1962. He had just graduated from high school in Michigan and came to New York to be a dancer. But his auditions didn’t work out, and he wound up homeless. He was staying at a friend’s apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. I was still a senior in high school then and sang in the choir at the White Rock Baptist Church in Harlem. I also sang in the Followers, a gospel vocal group. One day, I saw Nick standing in the back of our church as we sang. He was there looking for a hot meal. After we were introduced by his friend, I talked him into joining the Followers. In early ’63, the Followers performed at Sweet Chariot on West 46th Street. We had a nice run there until May, when the gospel club was picketed by a Harlem church. The minister felt gospel had no place in a club. The experience informed Nick and me to stick together as songwriters. Nick was the perfect mouthpiece for my melodies, and my piano inspired his lyrics.

    Our first hit, “Let’s Go Get Stoned,” was written with Joshie Armstead for the Coasters in 1965. Ray Charles recorded the song a year later and had a No. 1 R&B hit. The song’s success brought us to the attention of songwriter Eddie Holland at Motown. To do well there, Nick and I knew we needed a great song. Nick told me about lyrics he had written while walking down Central Park West. During his walk, he worried about whether he’d be able to remain in the city. That’s when he noticed that the buildings along the park looked like mountains. Words came to him: “Ain’t no mountain high enough / Ain’t no valley low enough / Ain’t no river wide enough / to keep me from getting to you.” The “you” here meant success. I loved the lines, and we used them to write a love song. When we were done, we recorded a demo with me on piano and Nick singing. Motown loved it and wanted the song for singer Tammi Terrell. She hadn’t had a big hit yet.

    Paul Riser: The first thing I did was record the rhythm track with the Funk Brothers, the label’s house band. After Tammi recorded her vocal, the producers decided the single would be stronger as a duet. Months earlier, Marvin had a hit with Kim Weston on “It Takes Two.” So Marvin was added to Tammi’s record to help its odds on the charts. Marvin was amazing. He overdubbed his vocal so it wrapped around hers, as if the two of them were in love, singing to each other in the studio.

    Mary Wilson: Tammi had a great record with “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” But in October ‘67, she collapsed on stage while performing with Marvin. Doctors later diagnosed she had a brain tumor, which kept her from touring. The following spring, the Supremes—Diana Ross, me and Cindy Birdsong, who had replaced Florence Ballard months earlier—recorded “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” for a duet album with the Temptations.

    Ms. Simpson: When Diana left the Supremes in the fall of ’69, (Motown founder) Berry Gordy asked Nick and me to produce her first album. Nick suggested we have Diana narrate an extended verse. He thought she had a great speaking voice, so he wrote new lyrics. I created an introduction that began as an instrumental and led into a choir that set up Diana’s spoken voice.

    Mr. Riser: Since the chorus didn’t come until late, I wanted the choir in the introduction to sing the chorus as “Ahhhs.” This worked like a Broadway musical overture, teasing what was coming later in the song.

    Ms. Simpson: When we began to record, we did the rhythm track first at Motown. I played piano with the Funk Brothers. That’s me on the record throughout.

    Eddie Willis: Valerie’s piano was coldblooded. Man, she could really play.

    Ms. Simpson: After New York, we overdubbed the choir parts and background vocals at Motown. When all of the music and background vocals were on tape, we had Diana come in to record her vocal. I wanted everything done so she’d hear all of it in her headset. We really got the best out of her. Producing is about getting something special out of an artist. We stretched Diana. She could do it, and she didn’t mind going for it. But when we gave the song’s final 6:18 mix to Berry, he felt it took too long to get to the chorus. Nick said to Berry, “It’s like an orgasm. You don’t have it immediately. It builds.” Berry insisted we at least cut it down for the single. Eventually I edited the song down to 3:32 so we could get it out. But many radio DJs played the album version instead. Nick and I felt vindicated. In the years that followed, something happened between Nick and myself. I’ll just say that when you’re writing love songs all day long with someone, you can wind up falling in love. We did. Nick and I married in 1974.


    ANATOMY OF A SONG By Marc Myers
    The Wall Street Journal - January 30, 2018
    Thanks so much for finding the full text; interesting information.

  36. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    I don't think it was a mistake, but it is interesting to ponder what releasing Mountain first would have done for the momentum of her solo career. My final thought might be that it wouldn't have changed things much if the follow up singles were still the same.
    Motown made a lot of mistakes with Diana, I feel. They wanted her to go full pop, she wanted to go full soul... shoot, when you get the deluxe edition of the album, you see where her thought process was at the time between 1969-72.

    But yeah you're right, it probably wouldn't have changed much.

  37. #87
    The one huge monster mistake Motown made with Diana was not releasing Blue. I think it remains her best or one of her best albums ever.

  38. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by jobeterob View Post
    The one huge monster mistake Motown made with Diana was not releasing Blue. I think it remains her best or one of her best albums ever.
    Probably - but of course they were looking for top 40 hits and I'm not sure Blue had one. But I'm sure glad we have it now!

  39. #89
    Motown was nicknamed "Hitsville" for a reason lmao

    And they already had TWO artists who decided artistry was more important than hits (MG/Wonder). They didn't want their biggest artist going down that path (though in retrospect they probably should've because you see what she does with a jazz/standard/traditional pop tune)...

  40. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by Circa 1824 View Post
    Wilsons only accomplishment in life has been to stand behind the big star for a few years, and then talk about it for several decades.
    except for Supremes or Diana's fans community, is she famous?

  41. #91
    Keep it on Diana, folks...

  42. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by midnightman View Post
    Motown made a lot of mistakes with Diana, I feel. They wanted her to go full pop, she wanted to go full soul... shoot, when you get the deluxe edition of the album, you see where her thought process was at the time between 1969-72.

    But yeah you're right, it probably wouldn't have changed much.
    Yeah, I think Motown was trying to keep Diana in a 60s mode, not catching on to the fact the 70s had a different vibe going on. With Diana wanting to do more soul in the 70s, it seems such a shame that when she was able to control her career in the 80s she seemed to gravitate toward more of a pop sound in order to keep up with the new crop of acts, and most of 80s pop (which I do love, btw) just didn't seem to be a good fit for her. I'll forever be annoyed that her Red Hot R&B album was sorely lacking on the R&B. I've said it before and I'll say it again: Diana Ross was blessed with the ability to sing just about any genre of music very well. But I've never bought her as a "pop" singer. I know some folks do, especially people who have a stereotypical idea of what a soul or r&b female singer is supposed to sound like. But I've always thought she was best on songs that had more of a r&b slant to it.

  43. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by jobeterob View Post
    The one huge monster mistake Motown made with Diana was not releasing Blue. I think it remains her best or one of her best albums ever.
    For my taste Blue is easily one of the best collections of music she's ever recorded. Such a beautifully done set of music. But in the wake of LSTB, would this have been overkill? Wasn't the time of the special collections like Rodgers and Hart and Funny Girl a thing of the past? I think so. As great as Blue is, I think Motown may have gotten this one right.

  44. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by midnightman View Post
    Motown was nicknamed "Hitsville" for a reason lmao

    And they already had TWO artists who decided artistry was more important than hits (MG/Wonder). They didn't want their biggest artist going down that path (though in retrospect they probably should've because you see what she does with a jazz/standard/traditional pop tune)...
    But that just shows the lack of genius that Motown sometimes displayed. Marvin and Stevie were hitting on all cylinders because their artistry connected with the public and turned whole albums into hits. Diana doesn't appear to be a songwriter worth speaking of, certainly not of Marvin or Stevie's caliber. So she never was going to sit down and create a clunker of an album. But if BG and the rest of the gang had kept their ears to the street, they could've created for Diana what MG and SW were doing for themselves.

    And the singles they released...I love "Sleepin". I think it's a great album cut, with a relevant storyline (sadly relevant still today). But who heard that and thought that radio was going to spin that song into sales and a hit? Definitely a lost opportunity not having Diana cut vocals on all the cuts for Mahogany. This was the time of the Black movie soundtrack racking up sales, and they give Diana an album of almost all instrumentals? Crazy.

    Motown was nicknamed "Hitsville" in the 60s but clearly by the 70s, especially where Diana was concerned, Gordy of all people didn't seem to have his mind on the hits as much as he did the movies and as we now know that was a bad idea.

  45. #95
    True. That's what I meant for Diana. Unfortunately, Motown never got with the times and that's why Diana eventually ended up leaving, I think.

  46. #96
    What surprises me the most is that, in the seventies, Motown promoted her like Liza Minnelli or Barbra Streisand.
    I'm not sure for the USA, but in Europe, it is obvious. About all the US stars, when abroad, appeared in tv shows, doing their latest single. The few time Diana was on French tv, in fact twice from 1970 to 1980, it was on talk shows about movies.

  47. #97
    I think the mistake Motown made was not allowing Diana to sing her own material at times and had her singing DONT RAIN ON MY PARADE or LADY IS A TRAMP, and other standards. that worked in the 60s but in the 70s, not so much.
    it started to irritate me as a fan. songs like Surrender ,I'm Still Waiting, Getting Ready For Love went under the radar. once I stayed up on a school night when Diana was appearing on the Tonight show and I thought she would sing her new song from Baby Its Me, but she sang one of the above standards. I was so furious I turned her off and went to bed. she was not that visable in the 70s so to me these tv appearances counted for promoting her music.
    I also think it was ridiculous not to release BLUE ,especially when Diana was off the charts for most of 1974 and 1975. but as usual with Motown you get it all at one time or nothing at all.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

[REMOVE ADS]

Ralph Terrana
MODERATOR

Welcome to Soulful Detroit! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
Soulful Detroit is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to Soulful Detroit. [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.