[REMOVE ADS]




Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1

    HDH and Invictus/Hot Wax

    I have always been a huge fan of HDH, and I was as excited to see a new composition/production by HDH as I was for a new release by the Supremes or Four Tops. Towards the end of their time at Motown, I thought their productions got more intricate, different, and very interesting [[Reflections, Forever Came Today, 7 Rooms of Gloom, Bernadette). After they left Motown, I anxiously awaited their new productions at Invictus / Hot Wax. While I liked them and dutifully bought the albums of Chairmen of the Board and Freda Payne, to me, there was something missing from these new compositions and productions. They did not seem as innovative and did not seem to have the punch that their productions had at Motown. I am not sure what it was, the acts were good, the musicians in many instances were the same, yet something seemed to be missing.

    Just curious to hear what other people think?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    4,727
    Rep Power
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by mofreaktown View Post
    I have always been a huge fan of HDH, and I was as excited to see a new composition/production by HDH as I was for a new release by the Supremes or Four Tops. Towards the end of their time at Motown, I thought their productions got more intricate, different, and very interesting [[Reflections, Forever Came Today, 7 Rooms of Gloom, Bernadette). After they left Motown, I anxiously awaited their new productions at Invictus / Hot Wax. While I liked them and dutifully bought the albums of Chairmen of the Board and Freda Payne, to me, there was something missing from these new compositions and productions. They did not seem as innovative and did not seem to have the punch that their productions had at Motown. I am not sure what it was, the acts were good, the musicians in many instances were the same, yet something seemed to be missing.

    Just curious to hear what other people think?
    Hmmm - Well, I was and am a big Invictus/Hot Wax fan. I was a Motown fan but at the time did not really follow producers so I admit I was buying I/HW releases because I just loved them! I didn't experience the 'something missing' aspect; I think they were a great label. Love my Laura Lee!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    838
    Rep Power
    127
    What I missed most were the Funk Brothers and Hitsville engineers. I felt the actual arrangements were okay. The Hot Wax/Invictus tracks all seemed to lack a depth of sound in the mixes, and also lacked the likes of James Jamerson and Mike Terry. There was just something missing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    43,221
    Rep Power
    568
    Quote Originally Posted by mofreaktown View Post
    I have always been a huge fan of HDH, and I was as excited to see a new composition/production by HDH as I was for a new release by the Supremes or Four Tops. Towards the end of their time at Motown, I thought their productions got more intricate, different, and very interesting [[Reflections, Forever Came Today, 7 Rooms of Gloom, Bernadette). After they left Motown, I anxiously awaited their new productions at Invictus / Hot Wax. While I liked them and dutifully bought the albums of Chairmen of the Board and Freda Payne, to me, there was something missing from these new compositions and productions. They did not seem as innovative and did not seem to have the punch that their productions had at Motown. I am not sure what it was, the acts were good, the musicians in many instances were the same, yet something seemed to be missing.

    Just curious to hear what other people think?
    They did not have the Funk Brothers. Their contributions to the "Motown Sound" was so underestimated. They also did not have Motown recording /sound engineers etc. So many people fail to realize that the greatness of Motown's recordings was through the effort of a conglomerate of people. With any of those elements missing, it will not have that umpf or whatever you came to expect coming through your speakers. That's why I find it impossible to give one person all the credit for the success of those Motown records.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    6,284
    Rep Power
    124
    Marv is exactly right. The Motown Sound was a collaboration and that's what you heard when a Motown record was played. Removing any of the Motown elements and you don't get the sound. It was impossible for HDH to recapture that at Invictus, even when using the Funk Brothers.

    With that being said, I think the stuff they were doing at Invictus was right in line with the innovations HDH were getting into toward the end of their Motown days. I never listen to any of it and think something is missing.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,894
    Rep Power
    155
    In a similar HDH presentation, I bought several years ago The Music Merchant Story CD for next to nothing. I was unfamiliar with MM because I concentrated on buying Invictus and Hot Wax 45's. The CD includes 22 songs digitally remastered and featured The Jones Girls, Smith Connection, Brenda Holloway [[Some Quiet Place), Brotherly Love, Eloise Laws, and the Just Brothers. Although there were no songs in the collection that would sell and sound like a million, it was a very enjoyable collection and I really liked the vast majority of them. I had never heard of the Music Merchant label. I think this was towards the end of the Invictus/Hot Wax era.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    43,221
    Rep Power
    568
    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    Marv is exactly right. The Motown Sound was a collaboration and that's what you heard when a Motown record was played. Removing any of the Motown elements and you don't get the sound. It was impossible for HDH to recapture that at Invictus, even when using the Funk Brothers.

    With that being said, I think the stuff they were doing at Invictus was right in line with the innovations HDH were getting into toward the end of their Motown days. I never listen to any of it and think something is missing.
    Add to that the fact that just about everything Invictus/Hot Wax released received considerable airplay in Detroit/Windsor/Toledo that it began to have it's own consistent sound. Powerhouse stations like CKLW the Big 8 broke a lot of Motown records first and they did the same for Invictus. Those records became very popular in the region.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    11,170
    Rep Power
    247
    Very interesting thread and great points though when I listen to Pay it to the Piper and Gimme just a little more time they sound sublime but I agree per the Funk Bros. For some reason Band Gold and Wants Ads never did much for me. Maybe for reasons noted above. Wasn't Music Merchant another HDH label? I remember hearing the Brenda release though and being very disappointed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    43,221
    Rep Power
    568
    Quote Originally Posted by luke View Post
    Very interesting thread and great points though when I listen to Pay it to the Piper and Gimme just a little more time they sound sublime but I agree per the Funk Bros. For some reason Band Gold and Wants Ads never did much for me. Maybe for reasons noted above. Wasn't Music Merchant another HDH label? I remember hearing the Brenda release though and being very disappointed.
    It's been said [[I don't know how true it is) that HDH pursued Motown "sound-a-like" artists for their label. For instance General Johnson was supposed to have a similar sound to Levi of the Four Tops, Freda was to provide a "pseudo-Supremes" sound and on and on and on. I personally did not think they sounded like one another.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    6,284
    Rep Power
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by woodward View Post
    In a similar HDH presentation, I bought several years ago The Music Merchant Story CD for next to nothing. I was unfamiliar with MM because I concentrated on buying Invictus and Hot Wax 45's. The CD includes 22 songs digitally remastered and featured The Jones Girls, Smith Connection, Brenda Holloway [[Some Quiet Place), Brotherly Love, Eloise Laws, and the Just Brothers. Although there were no songs in the collection that would sell and sound like a million, it was a very enjoyable collection and I really liked the vast majority of them. I had never heard of the Music Merchant label. I think this was towards the end of the Invictus/Hot Wax era.
    Smith Connection and Eloise Laws cut some great stuff IMO.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    6,284
    Rep Power
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by luke View Post
    I remember hearing the Brenda release though and being very disappointed.
    Same here Luke.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    6,284
    Rep Power
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    It's been said [[I don't know how true it is) that HDH pursued Motown "sound-a-like" artists for their label. For instance General Johnson was supposed to have a similar sound to Levi of the Four Tops, Freda was to provide a "pseudo-Supremes" sound and on and on and on. I personally did not think they sounded like one another.
    I can believe that. I can't imagine that anyone would leave Motown to create their own label and not try to recreate the magic. I can hear some similarities between the General and Levi, but I don't think anyone would mistake them for each other. Not sure who Freda was supposed to sound like, but I could see HDH grooming her as their version of Ross. I think Freda had the goods. I'm amazed she isn't widely known beyond her two biggest hits.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    11,170
    Rep Power
    247
    I think she's made a name for herself as a jazz/cabaret chanteuse.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    43,221
    Rep Power
    568
    Quote Originally Posted by luke View Post
    I think she's made a name for herself as a jazz/cabaret chanteuse.
    I have an album of Freda's from 1964 which was quite good. "After the Lights Go Down Low and Much More!!!"

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,718
    Rep Power
    173
    Please fon't forget the Honey Cone and Laura Lee,,,

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    4,727
    Rep Power
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by captainjames View Post
    Please fon't forget the Honey Cone and Laura Lee,,,
    Now, Captain - I'd never forget the Honey Cone - and I did mention Ms. Laura Lee!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    4,727
    Rep Power
    106
    BTW - the British label Edsel has / had an HDH imprint reissue program featuring 3 lps on a 2 cd set - they're a great buy.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,821
    Rep Power
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by BigAl View Post
    What I missed most were the Funk Brothers and Hitsville engineers. I felt the actual arrangements were okay. The Hot Wax/Invictus tracks all seemed to lack a depth of sound in the mixes, and also lacked the likes of James Jamerson and Mike Terry. There was just something missing.
    I thought it was well known the Funk Brothers were on Hot Wax/Invictus recordings. Maybe not the entire crew, but it was confirmed by Ray Monette and Ralph that HDH used the Funks on most of their recordings. They're the entire rhythm section on "Band Of Gold" and "Give Me Just A Little More Time."

    I think the reason why HDH lacked innovation was due to the fact they were running the label. Instead of focusing all of their energy on writing and producing, they had to multitask.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,490
    Rep Power
    142
    Aside from the valid points above, there are other explanations to consider as to why Invictus' music was not as cutting edge as Motown.

    Without the Funks, HDH relied on Detroit musicians who were simply not as versatile or tuned to one another as the Funk Bros. Add to this, HDH had to use their own money to launch Invictus so equipment, promotions, etc were much more budgeted than Motown. They didn't have the millions Gordy had to pour into launching new acts.

    Also consider that HDH had to become businessmen now. At Motown they could concentrate fully on creativity. Now they had to oversee to business matters.

    When it came to distribution they had to depend on bigger labels, first Capital then Buddah to get the product out. Therefore the Invictus artists were not priorities at these other labels.

    I think where HDH went wrong was trying to launch so many different artists into a production line the way Motown had done so successfully. When you copy somebody else's successful way of doing things it usually does not work. Lightning never strikes twice. If they had concentrated to three or four acts maybe success would have been greater.

    Regardless, I think Freda Payne's "Contact" lp and Honey Cones "Soulful Tapestry" lp are two of the best soul lps of the early 1970s. All the stops were pulled for Freda's lp but the distribution and promotion limited a gorgeous album from being a big seller. There's not one bad song on that "Contact" lp. It ranks up there with Martha Reeves' brilliant but lost MCA debut lp

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    4,727
    Rep Power
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by BayouMotownMan View Post
    Aside from the valid points above, there are other explanations to consider as to why Invictus' music was not as cutting edge as Motown.

    Without the Funks, HDH relied on Detroit musicians who were simply not as versatile or tuned to one another as the Funk Bros. Add to this, HDH had to use their own money to launch Invictus so equipment, promotions, etc were much more budgeted than Motown. They didn't have the millions Gordy had to pour into launching new acts.

    Also consider that HDH had to become businessmen now. At Motown they could concentrate fully on creativity. Now they had to oversee to business matters.

    When it came to distribution they had to depend on bigger labels, first Capital then Buddah to get the product out. Therefore the Invictus artists were not priorities at these other labels.

    I think where HDH went wrong was trying to launch so many different artists into a production line the way Motown had done so successfully. When you copy somebody else's successful way of doing things it usually does not work. Lightning never strikes twice. If they had concentrated to three or four acts maybe success would have been greater.

    Regardless, I think Freda Payne's "Contact" lp and Honey Cones "Soulful Tapestry" lp are two of the best soul lps of the early 1970s. All the stops were pulled for Freda's lp but the distribution and promotion limited a gorgeous album from being a big seller. There's not one bad song on that "Contact" lp. It ranks up there with Martha Reeves' brilliant but lost MCA debut lp
    This. 'Contact' and 'Soulful Tapestry' are both brills soul LPs.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,537
    Rep Power
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by mofreaktown View Post
    I have always been a huge fan of HDH, and I was as excited to see a new composition/production by HDH as I was for a new release by the Supremes or Four Tops. Towards the end of their time at Motown, I thought their productions got more intricate, different, and very interesting [[Reflections, Forever Came Today, 7 Rooms of Gloom, Bernadette). After they left Motown, I anxiously awaited their new productions at Invictus / Hot Wax. While I liked them and dutifully bought the albums of Chairmen of the Board and Freda Payne, to me, there was something missing from these new compositions and productions. They did not seem as innovative and did not seem to have the punch that their productions had at Motown. I am not sure what it was, the acts were good, the musicians in many instances were the same, yet something seemed to be missing.

    Just curious to hear what other people think?
    I feel that Invictus/Hot Wax was launched with a bang. They had great songs [[like 'Give Me Just A Little More Time', 'Band Of Gold', 'Westbound #9', 'Want Ads', 'Women's Love Rights' and others) that were amongst the best early '70s Soul hits. And I don't feel that they needed to duplicate the punch of 'The Motown Sound' that they had with The Funk Bros. [[although various members 'moonlighted' on some of the Invictus/Hot Wax songs). However, I do feel that things went off-track for H-D-H after 1973 as they had ran out of great songs & ran into the business problems that would shut down their labels.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    931
    Rep Power
    149
    Here's my two cents worth. I agree, musically, the compositions themselves did not appear to be quite so innovative and distinguishable as I would have anticipated. Yes, a simple repeat of the Motown sound was not expected by me, however, I expected the productions would have more pizazz [[is that a word) than what I heard. There was a certain element of sophistication lacking. This is just my opinion. Was it bad? By no means. Did the productions excite me? No.
    Last edited by jobucats; 07-14-2017 at 10:16 PM.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,560
    Rep Power
    140
    as a HUGE Motown fan, I feel Invictus/Hot Wax took up the banner and was very cutting edge the problem as mentioned above was that HDH[[involved with a lawsuit from Motown) had to also become business men. The real problem was the money flow as Capital & Buddah took too much off the top. After I while I'm sure they felt the bleeding.

  24. #24

    What if

    I have only recently been able to appreciate the HDH stuff after they left Motown mainly because the Funks werent all there and the arrangements lacked something by comparison.

    So having no longer got the vinyl I decided to acquire a compilation cd.

    And from that where I assume most of the mixes are stereo, I have acquired more of a liking for HDH output on Invictus, Hot Wax and Music Merchant.

    Now what if HDH had not left Motown when they did and carried on to write the same songs [[dont give me any Wayne/Dunbar grief - the songs are surely HDH!).

    Who at Motown would have recorded Band of Gold... it's too ballsey a song for Ross. I can hear Tammi doing it but my bet would have been Martha and I reckon it was a number one in her hands.

    The Tops could have come storming back to top of the charts with the Chairmen songs. And I would like to have heard the Velvelettes doing the songs given to the Honeycone.

    Anyone else got some fantasies along these lines?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    43,221
    Rep Power
    568
    Quote Originally Posted by fatmaninthethirdrow View Post
    I have only recently been able to appreciate the HDH stuff after they left Motown mainly because the Funks werent all there and the arrangements lacked something by comparison.

    So having no longer got the vinyl I decided to acquire a compilation cd.

    And from that where I assume most of the mixes are stereo, I have acquired more of a liking for HDH output on Invictus, Hot Wax and Music Merchant.

    Now what if HDH had not left Motown when they did and carried on to write the same songs [[dont give me any Wayne/Dunbar grief - the songs are surely HDH!).

    Who at Motown would have recorded Band of Gold... it's too ballsey a song for Ross. I can hear Tammi doing it but my bet would have been Martha and I reckon it was a number one in her hands.

    The Tops could have come storming back to top of the charts with the Chairmen songs. And I would like to have heard the Velvelettes doing the songs given to the Honeycone.

    Anyone else got some fantasies along these lines?
    I like your post. Some very interesting ideas as to who would have recorded HDH's later compositions.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,537
    Rep Power
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by fatmaninthethirdrow View Post
    I have only recently been able to appreciate the HDH stuff after they left Motown mainly because the Funks werent all there and the arrangements lacked something by comparison.

    So having no longer got the vinyl I decided to acquire a compilation cd.

    And from that where I assume most of the mixes are stereo, I have acquired more of a liking for HDH output on Invictus, Hot Wax and Music Merchant.

    Now what if HDH had not left Motown when they did and carried on to write the same songs [[dont give me any Wayne/Dunbar grief - the songs are surely HDH!).

    Who at Motown would have recorded Band of Gold... it's too ballsey a song for Ross. I can hear Tammi doing it but my bet would have been Martha and I reckon it was a number one in her hands.

    The Tops could have come storming back to top of the charts with the Chairmen songs. And I would like to have heard the Velvelettes doing the songs given to the Honeycone.

    Anyone else got some fantasies along these lines?
    I sure do! I can see The Four Tops doing 'Give Me Just A Little More Time', 'Everything's Tuesday', 'Somebody's Been Sleeping [[In My Bed)' & 'I Can't Find Myself'. The [['70s) Supremes doing 'Band Of Gold', 'Stick Up' & 'Want Ads'. Martha & the Vandellas doing 'Women's Love Rights', 'Rip Off', & 'I'll Catch You When You Fall'. The Undisputed Truth doing 'Crumbs Off The Table', 'I Can't Be You [[You Can't Be Me'). Diana Ross could do 'I'm Not Getting Any Better/Suddenly It's Yesterday' & 'You Brought The Joy' And Rare Earth could do 'Westbound #9' & 'Mind, Body & Soul'.

    As Freda Payne once sang, 'The Road We Didn't Take'....

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    18,007
    Rep Power
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by fatmaninthethirdrow View Post
    I have only recently been able to appreciate the HDH stuff after they left Motown mainly because the Funks werent all there and the arrangements lacked something by comparison.

    So having no longer got the vinyl I decided to acquire a compilation cd.

    And from that where I assume most of the mixes are stereo, I have acquired more of a liking for HDH output on Invictus, Hot Wax and Music Merchant.

    Now what if HDH had not left Motown when they did and carried on to write the same songs [[dont give me any Wayne/Dunbar grief - the songs are surely HDH!).

    Who at Motown would have recorded Band of Gold... it's too ballsey a song for Ross. I can hear Tammi doing it but my bet would have been Martha and I reckon it was a number one in her hands.

    The Tops could have come storming back to top of the charts with the Chairmen songs. And I would like to have heard the Velvelettes doing the songs given to the Honeycone.

    Anyone else got some fantasies along these lines?
    What about Shorty Long? LOLOL

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    6,131
    Rep Power
    133
    Great thread and interesting thoughts y'all. I don't know nearly enough about HDH after Motown, or about the Hot Wax/Invictus label, so will have to look into it all. Love the few hits I do know by Freda, The Chairmen, Honey Cone and 100 Proof of course.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    4,727
    Rep Power
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by TomatoTom123 View Post
    Great thread and interesting thoughts y'all. I don't know nearly enough about HDH after Motown, or about the Hot Wax/Invictus label, so will have to look into it all. Love the few hits I do know by Freda, The Chairmen, Honey Cone and 100 Proof of course.
    There's a 'back to the street' sound about HW/I that I love; I think there are some playlists on YouTube that fans have made -

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,052
    Rep Power
    166
    Could have been a prime candidate for a Motown buy out maybe. I thought some of the edits were a bit rough at times [[Deeper and Deeper springs to mind). There was also the invention of new words such as 'MOMENTUMS of the love we shared' from Odds and Ends. Yes could have done with a little more QC but nevertheless an awesome breadth of output and some excellent sounds.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,475
    Rep Power
    140
    I agree that part of the HDH problem was the compressed sound of their music. Perhaps they were going by the old Motown principle of wanting it to sound good in the car on the AM radio which were still prominent in the earliest seventies.

    I'd love top hear this song remastered with more depth :



    It may have been a problem in the mastering, not the studio . Tom Moulton found that skill so important for getting the full sound of a recording that he began insisting that Jose Rodriquez get label credit for it.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,537
    Rep Power
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    I agree that part of the HDH problem was the compressed sound of their music. Perhaps they were going by the old Motown principle of wanting it to sound good in the car on the AM radio which were still prominent in the earliest seventies.

    I'd love top hear this song remastered with more depth :



    It may have been a problem in the mastering, not the studio . Tom Moulton found that skill so important for getting the full sound of a recording that he began insisting that Jose Rodriquez get label credit for it.

    And they were proud of [[at the time) the compressed sound for greater sound quality on the radio. Check out these pictures on Invictus singles for instance.






  33. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    1,041
    Rep Power
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by fatmaninthethirdrow View Post
    I have only recently been able to appreciate the HDH stuff after they left Motown mainly because the Funks werent all there and the arrangements lacked something by comparison.

    So having no longer got the vinyl I decided to acquire a compilation cd.

    And from that where I assume most of the mixes are stereo, I have acquired more of a liking for HDH output on Invictus, Hot Wax and Music Merchant.

    Now what if HDH had not left Motown when they did and carried on to write the same songs [[dont give me any Wayne/Dunbar grief - the songs are surely HDH!).

    Who at Motown would have recorded Band of Gold... it's too ballsey a song for Ross. I can hear Tammi doing it but my bet would have been Martha and I reckon it was a number one in her hands.

    The Tops could have come storming back to top of the charts with the Chairmen songs. And I would like to have heard the Velvelettes doing the songs given to the Honeycone.

    Anyone else got some fantasies along these lines?
    I think the Four Tops doing "Patches" would have worked. Levi would have killed it!

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,537
    Rep Power
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by lockhartgary View Post
    I think the Four Tops doing "Patches" would have worked. Levi would have killed it!
    Yes indeed; The Four Tops would've made a killer version of 'Patches'. Also if H-D-H had stayed with Motown Records, The Tops [[and Martha & the Vandellas) would've stayed with the company at least thru the mid '70s because each of them would've had huge hits with songs like 'Give Me Just A Little More Time', 'Want Ads', Women's Love Rights, & 'She's Not Just Another Woman'. Finally, I've always wondered what The Supremes [[Jean, Mary & Cindy) would've sounded like doing The Honey Cone's classic 'The Day I Found Myself'.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    179
    Rep Power
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by lockhartgary View Post
    I think the Four Tops doing "Patches" would have worked. Levi would have killed it!
    I also think that Edwin Starr could have knocked 'Patches' out of the park and wouldn't Yvonne Fair have had a field day with 'Women's Love Rights' and 'Rip Off'!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

[REMOVE ADS]

Ralph Terrana
MODERATOR

Welcome to Soulful Detroit! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
Soulful Detroit is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to Soulful Detroit. [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.