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  1. #1

    Teen Asks 'What If America Loved Black People as Much as It Loves Black Culture'

    I watched this video ('Don't Cash Crop My Cornrows') today and came away very impressed. Surprisingly, it was produced as a project for this young lady's (Amandla Stenberg) history class. Ms. Stenberg is an actress who appeared in 'The Hunger Games' a few years ago. The video is about the appropriation of Black cultural elements into the mainstream while leaving those who created it to effectively exist as second class citizens.

    She has excellent points throughout the video and her thesis is laid out in a a surprisingly effective and mature way for someone who is 16 years old. It's about five minutes long, but I wish every adult in the U.S. could take those five minutes to watch it and ponder what she's saying. Her future is bright.



    http://clandesteen.tumblr.com/post/1...h-discourse-on

  2. #2
    Thank you Jerry for this.

  3. #3
    I saw that, and it's excellent. Problem is: few white people will think about it beyond thinking "that's racist!".

  4. #4
    You are correct. But I also wonder how many Black people understand and appreciate what was said. Especially the young folks.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    You are correct. But I also wonder how many Black people understand and appreciate what was said. Especially the young folks.
    Few, I'd bet, very few...
    And although she makes some good points, for me a better question would be:
    What if most Black Americans loved Black cultural contributions to American history as much
    or even more than many white or other non black people do?...

  6. #6
    Excellent question, splanky. I often wonder if Jackie Robinson would shed a tear to see some of the direct beneficiaries of his struggle waste their talents and great fortune by doing drugs or failing to play their respective sports to the best of their ability? I also wonder what Dr. King or Minister Shabazz would say if they saw my brothers walking down the street with their pants belted to their thighs and their underwear displayed?

    The reason that I bring this up in context of this video is that it seems that the relative ignorance of some is what affects the opinions of non-Black Americans, no matter what important cultural contributions we make. It's like the discussion in 'Do The Right Thing' when one of Sal's Italian sons loved Black culture but held disrespect for Black people. He was a big fan of Prince and Michael Jordan, but the only thing the folks in Queens could do for him was buy his pizza and leave him alone.

  7. #7
    It's a very truthful video. The young lady is right on point.

    I posted on this regarding my life and thoughts on this on Facebook.
    I have been fully amerced and fully supported in every way for the last 50 years.
    To hear what I had to say, you'll have to read that whole paragraph on Facebook under the original post made by Habilah (spelling).

    S.S.
    ***

  8. #8
    Correct, Jerry. The significance on most things that originated with Blacks are lost on the the youth, and most of society.

  9. #9
    very good,

  10. #10
    Methinks the best defense, in the hip hop world, by one of its own, was (on YouTube recently) -" What dat is? Why you using big words,yo??!!"

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by nativeNY63 View Post
    Methinks the best defense, in the hip hop world, by one of its own, was (on YouTube recently) -" What dat is? Why you using big words,yo??!!"
    LOL. Reminds me of that old rap song with a chorus where one person asked "Who dat is?" and the response was "That's just my baby' daddy". I turned that song off every time it played on the radio.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    LOL. Reminds me of that old rap song with a chorus where one person asked "Who dat is?" and the response was "That's just my baby' daddy". I turned that song off every time it played on the radio.
    Remember it well! Wish I could un-remember it, though.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    LOL. Reminds me of that old rap song with a chorus where one person asked "Who dat is?" and the response was "That's just my baby' daddy". I turned that song off every time it played on the radio.
    I guess I shgould be glad I never heard of it.

    Hey Jerry! Stay healthy and safe, my brother.

  14. #14
    Thanks, Homeboy. Hope life still finds you well. I'm thinking you are having plenty of interesting conversations with the world flipping upside down. Between COVID-19, President Plump and people finally paying attention to racist policing after 400 years, I'm finding fools to debate in great numbers, online and off. I imagine you're having plenty of opportunities to educate them as well.

  15. #15
    We as a race have been invisible as far as our contributions for years,all most folks wanted was for our women to clean their houses and our men to work as a janitor or construction,yes we had teachers,lawyers ect.but mostly in our own communities.and sadly even today some still refuse to see us.

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