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Thread: Remember when?

  1. #351
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    How many of you remember when cigarettes had coupons in the pack that could be redeemed for things like fishing rod and reels? LOL! How about the S&H Green stamps your mom would get with every grocery purchase that were put in a book and once you've collected a specific number she would redeem them for all sorts of mundane merchandise, but mostly kitchen appliances?

    Attachment 10233

    Attachment 10234
    I do indeed remember these, and Gold Bond stamps, too!

  2. #352
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    I do indeed remember these, and Gold Bond stamps, too!
    You remember when gas stations would give you (or rather your dad) prizes or gifts with every fill up?

  3. #353
    I remember when stations looked like this:

    Attachment 10245

  4. #354
    Hah! I remember when the gas station attendant would clean your window while the tank was being filled. Dude normally was smoking and had a dirty rag hanging out of his back pocket... They didn't even care much if they went over by a quarter or so.

  5. #355
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Hah! I remember when the gas station attendant would clean your window while the tank was being filled. Dude normally was smoking and had a dirty rag hanging out of his back pocket... They didn't even care much if they went over by a quarter or so.
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    Yes, I remember all that. And, gasoline was around that much pr\er gallon, or even less, when I was young.

  6. #356
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Hah! I remember when the gas station attendant would clean your window while the tank was being filled. Dude normally was smoking and had a dirty rag hanging out of his back pocket... They didn't even care much if they went over by a quarter or so.
    Jerry I remember that too, but I also remember the attendants being in clean white uniforms. They'd give you stuff a toy dinosaur at the Sinclair stations LOL!

  7. #357
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Yes, I remember all that. And, gasoline was around that much pr\er gallon, or even less, when I was young.
    Cigarettes were $0.35 a pack the earliest I remember.

  8. #358
    I am sure you guys remember this.....................

    Attachment 10247

  9. #359
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I am sure you guys remember this.....................

    Attachment 10247
    I had this one! The song I had on the record was "Maybe Tomorrow", but I already had it on the album.

  10. #360
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    You remember when gas stations would give you (or rather your dad) prizes or gifts with every fill up?
    Hah!. well, by the time I remembered gas stations, my parents had divorced, but. no they didn't do prizes at the Standard gas station. They didn't wear white clothes, either. But they did oil changes, brakes, shocks, tire rotations, and other engine work. And, they cleaned your windows and checked your oil.

    I remember in the late 70s when they first started having the customer pump their own gas. I hated it on one hand because I was the one who had to get out and do it, and I hated having to pull down the license plate to get to the gas tank. And we had a locking gas cap which was a bitch to remove. On the other hand, I liked it because, even as a kid, I never trusted the attendant to fill up the tank because I felt he could manipulate the price in the pump.

  11. #361
    Originally Posted by soulster
    The good old days weren't always so good.

    Quote Originally Posted by 144man View Post
    I'll need a bit of convincing on that one.
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    Will you really, 144man?

    And how good were race relations back in "Our Good Old Days"? I remember (while visiting The Chicago Area in 1951) that our family wasn't allowed on certain public beaches in Indiana - and we were "Caucasians". Imagine how I'd feel about those "Good Old Days" if I were an African-American?

    I carried a switchblade to junior high school, because some of the Ukrainian gang or bully types would jump us Jews on the way to or from school (ostensibly because some of our ancestors killed their "god" (who, incidentally, was a Jew, himself, who they'd have jumped and attempted to beat up (I guess????)). And that was in benign Canada, whose race relations were much less nasty than those in USA.

    And if you're British, and such race relations as these don't apply (which i can't imagine, as The British upper classes have always been terribly racist), how did you like having to constantly toss an half crown into the box to get a little more heat on a freezing winter night? (or do you STILL have to do that?

    Like all places on Earth and all times, there were good and bad things. Whether the overall experience could be more positive than negative, or better or worse than another time depends upon one's values (and memory).

    Personally, I enjoy my life more now than I did in the good old days. But, I would not want to be growing up now, because The World is way too bizarre. I identify much more with the 1940s through 1960s. But it may have been a tougher life to get through back then as compared to now. But, perhaps it was more rewarding to do so.

    Most people I know identify with the period of their teens or their 20s. A few identify with their early 30s. Their "good old days" almost always come from those times, regardless of whether or not they "enjoyed" other times better.
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-10-2015 at 04:18 AM.

  12. #362
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Gotcha. My school was interesting. You had the rockers, the jocks/cheerleaders, the pot smokers, the audio/visual kids, the brainiacs, band, and art class kids. There was a little overlap among all of these groups, but for the most part, after 10th grade, the only White and Black kids who hung with each other were on the football team or the smart kids. I had White acquaintances, but no White friends (unlike in junior high). I don't recall any racial incidents in school at all; there was absolutely no beef between any of us (thank God). So no, we didn't joke with each other, let alone make fun of each other.

    I would have had a much different experience had that occurred and I'm glad that it didn't. I was speaking much more from a societal standpoint, not a personal standpoint.
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    I went to high school in the early 1960s. Bowen High School in South Chicago. It was a very mixed neighbourhood back then (about half and half). There was a fair amount of mixing, even after 10th Grade. We lived just a few blocks from the boundary with The South Side (which was 100% African-American. I worked at my father's store on The South Side, and had a bunch of friends from there, in addition to friends from school. I'd say that about 3/4 of my friends were African Americans (we had mainly sports and music in common, but also a few of us had academic pursuits in common, as well). But, yes, in general, the "White" kids would hang with "The Whites", and "The Blacks" with "The Blacks". I was one of the exceptions, partly because I had connections to The Black community early, and partly because I was a "foreigner" who hadn't been indoctrinated into the US "racial situation" from an early age (my uncle had operated a store on The South Side from before my birth, and hung out there when we visited in summers and Christmas time during my pre-high school years).
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-10-2015 at 04:45 AM.

  13. #363
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    Originally Posted by soulster
    The good old days weren't always so good.



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    Will you really, 144man?

    And how good were race relations back in "Our Good Old Days"? I remember (while visiting The Chicago Area in 1951) that our family wasn't allowed on certain public beaches in Indiana - and we were "Caucasians". Imagine how I'd feel about those "Good Old Days" if I were an African-American?

    I carried a switchblade to junior high school, because some of the Ukrainian gang or bully types would jump us Jews on the way to or from school (ostensibly because some of our ancestors killed their "god" (who, incidentally, was a Jew, himself, who they'd have jumped and attempted to beat up (I guess????)). And that was in benign Canada, whose race relations were much less nasty than those in USA.

    And if you're British, and such race relations as these don't apply (which i can't imagine, as The British upper classes have always been terribly racist), how did you like having to constantly toss an half crown into the box to get a little more heat on a freezing winter night? (or do you STILL have to do that?

    Like all places on Earth and all times, there were good and bad things. Whether the overall experience could be more positive than negative, or better or worse than another time depends upon one's values (and memory).

    Personally, I enjoy my life more now than I did in the good old days. But, I would not want to be growing up now, because The World is way too bizarre. I identify much more with the 1940s through 1960s. But it may have been a tougher life to get through back then as compared to now. But, perhaps it was more rewarding to do so.

    Most people I know identify with the period of their teens or their 20s. A few identify with their early 30s. Their "good old days" almost always come from those times, regardless of whether or not they "enjoyed" other times better.
    Robb, you make many good points. As children in the sixties, my brothers and sister did not come directly in contact with racism. We were even in Mississippi that summer of '64 when Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner were murdered. We were in Memphis 2 months after MLK was assassinated in '68......Heck we were in Kent, OH one month after the students were killed at Kent State in '70 and did not realized how close to history we were.

  14. #364
    I didn't have many issues with racism, but I was called the word by White folks in both Columbus, Ohio and Norfolk, Virginia. I still have issues with those incidents. But I recognize my problems were with the racists who were bold enough to catch me in bad situations (where I could either respond and be shot, beat down by a crowd, or live to tell about it), not with every person who has the same color skin as them.

    If for no other reasons, I'm glad to have lived long enough to grown wise in some matters, especially race. What a silly reason to hate somebody or to hold them back! And the kicker of it is, I've had more race-related problems from Black people than White folk. I've given up hope that I'll see racism defeated before I leave this world.

  15. #365
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I didn't have many issues with racism, but I was called the word by White folks in both Columbus, Ohio and Norfolk, Virginia. I still have issues with those incidents. But I recognize my problems were with the racists who were bold enough to catch me in bad situations (where I could either respond and be shot, beat down by a crowd, or live to tell about it), not with every person who has the same color skin as them.

    If for no other reasons, I'm glad to have lived long enough to grown wise in some matters, especially race. What a silly reason to hate somebody or to hold them back! And the kicker of it is, I've had more race-related problems from Black people than White folk. I've given up hope that I'll see racism defeated before I leave this world.
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    I agree. Humans will always find an excuse to separate from each other into antagonistic groups. I guess perhaps its some sort of survival technique for when there are too many of their species in a given area, or else a genetic defect that gets weeded out of the population when natural selection is operating. But, now that we use science to allow all infants to live and reach the age of procreation, all sorts of traits that work against human survival exist in large numbers of that population, as Nature's way of limiting that population, in order to save life in general (e.g. keep that species which is detrimental to all life on the planet, from killing off all life). Currently, the natural checks on that detrimental rogue species (Humans) are only in the early stages of the battle, so it looks like they are losing, and Humans will overpopulate Earth much more than the situation now, and will continue to kill off species after species, and, eventually, the threshhold will be crossed, and all life on Earth will be doomed. But, that's only how it looks to us. Very soon (in geological time) there will be climatalogical changes that will wipe out the majority of Humans (or, possibly all of them), and The Earth and its life will be saved. I'm glad I won't be around for most of that (if not all of the bad times). But, let's not dwell on this subject. Let's go back to thinking about the nostalgic things from the past that we enjoyed. If we are in our last quarter of life, or twilight years, we already paid our dues, and deserve an easier time of it.

  16. #366
    I had lots of situations with White racists, Mexican racists, and Black racists, but most of it came from White and Mexican, and was overt with several of "those words", constant harassment, and violence. With Blacks, it was mostly just the accusation that I wasn't "Black" enough". These days, the only racism I get is from Whites.

  17. #367
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    The US has mellowed out with regard to racism a fair amount over the past 65 years. But, it's still too racist for my taste. I spend a few months each year in L.A., but I still feel a tension and see a lot of incidents that give an uneasy feeling. I don't like the atmosphere. There are lots of angry people.

  18. #368
    Remember when the world was a much bigger place? Reliable intentional transportation and the internet have made travel and communication much easier. If course, the easier we are able to communicate, the less we seem to be able to understand each other. Ego and the desire to elevate over our peers get in the way of serving the common good.

  19. #369
    I remember when it was much easier to go all over town[d.c.]before the subway was built [76]they eliminated many bus routes and things got slow,the buses ran every twenty minutes[rain,sleet,snow]like clock work.

  20. #370
    World did seem like a very big place, but now I can go to just about any city I have visited in the past and if I am there more than 2 days run into someone i had not seen in years!

  21. #371
    Sometimes i hope in the caddy and drive real slow and after a couple days i'm at the other end of da hood,and folks aren't too glad to see me cause they ain't got my cash.

  22. #372
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Sometimes i hope in the caddy and drive real slow and after a couple days i'm at the other end of da hood,and folks aren't too glad to see me cause they ain't got my cash.
    HA HA ! Shut up! whoa hehehehehehehehe.;............ LOL!

  23. #373
    On a more grim note, does anyone remember when they read the total daily casualties of the Vietnamese War off on the evening news? Even as young as I was, I'll never forget how bad it was too hear that hundreds of soldiers died overseas on those days. It got home especially hard because I lost a cousin and had an uncle who served three tours.

    Nowadays, nobody seems to notice that we had over 14,000 murders last year; Americans killing Americans. Remember when you could go to a nightclub, bump into a stranger, apologize for being so clumsy, and have that guy but shoot you in the parking lot?

  24. #374
    Yep i recall those good times in the club when folks just wanted to get their party on and have a good time,and in those clubs everyone was packin but it was about having fun.

  25. #375
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    On a more grim note, does anyone remember when they read the total daily casualties of the Vietnamese War off on the evening news? Even as young as I was, I'll never forget how bad it was too hear that hundreds of soldiers died overseas on those days. It got home especially hard because I lost a cousin and had an uncle who served three tours.

    Nowadays, nobody seems to notice that we had over 14,000 murders last year; Americans killing Americans. Remember when you could go to a nightclub, bump into a stranger, apologize for being so clumsy, and have that guy but shoot you in the parking lot?
    I do remember. I also remember the draft lottery show they would show on TV. What I remember most is driving through town with my father during the late 60s, at Christmas time and seeing all of the blue and red star decals in the windows of homes that had a family member over in Vietnam.

  26. #376
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Yep i recall those good times in the club when folks just wanted to get their party on and have a good time,and in those clubs everyone was packin but it was about having fun.
    In those days the rule was you did not step on anyone shoes at the club or party.

  27. #377
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I do remember. I also remember the draft lottery show they would show on TV. What I remember most is driving through town with my father during the late 60s, at Christmas time and seeing all of the blue and red star decals in the windows of homes that had a family member over in Vietnam.
    Of course I registered, but it was only after seeing "Apocalypse Now" that I had to consider whether to conscientiously object if I was too be drafted. Glad I never had to worry about it.

  28. #378
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    In those days the rule was you did not step on anyone shoes at the club or party.
    As a young adult, I primarily went to three clubs. One was more fun, but you had to go with your dudes to avoid problems. Another was more upscals where the field were smoking hot but didn't dance with guys they didn't know. The last one served great fried fish sandwiches, but if you looked at somebody sideways (or if they THOUGHT you did), you'd find yourself on a platter cold with no sides.

    I don't go out anymore.

  29. #379
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    The US has mellowed out with regard to racism a fair amount over the past 65 years. But, it's still too racist for my taste. I spend a few months each year in L.A., but I still feel a tension and see a lot of incidents that give an uneasy feeling. I don't like the atmosphere. There are lots of angry people.
    You are sadly mistaken. The U.S. is seething with racism, and I hear it and see it virtually every single day! You go to L.A., but go to "small-town USA" and you will see and hear a lot worse!

  30. #380
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    On a more grim note, does anyone remember when they read the total daily casualties of the Vietnamese War off on the evening news? Even as young as I was, I'll never forget how bad it was too hear that hundreds of soldiers died overseas on those days. It got home especially hard because I lost a cousin and had an uncle who served three tours.

    Nowadays, nobody seems to notice that we had over 14,000 murders last year; Americans killing Americans. Remember when you could go to a nightclub, bump into a stranger, apologize for being so clumsy, and have that guy but shoot you in the parking lot?
    Yup. I remember the nightly body-bag count on the CBS News with Walter Cronkite, the one we watched.

    Sure, you can get shot just looking at a cop now, but I think the violence is a bit overstated. The fact is, violence has been on a steady decline over the last decade. Bad economic times does that.

  31. #381
    You know that like I do. But the editors of the news divisions at CBS, ABC, NBC, CNN, MSNBC, and (of course Faux) can't take the time to check facts. They buy the FOP, PBA, and National Sheriffs' Association narrative that calling for an end to police brutality is the same as declaring a "war on police". SMH.

    One great thing about living today is we have access to the truth if we want to take the time to research it. God forbid the fact that policing is much safer in 2015 than it's ever been be known to the masses. But that's probably fodder for another thread... Sorry, y'all.

  32. #382
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Of course I registered, but it was only after seeing "Apocalypse Now" that I had to consider whether to conscientiously object if I was too be drafted. Glad I never had to worry about it.
    I registered too around 1980 when the government made it mandatory.

  33. #383
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    As a young adult, I primarily went to three clubs. One was more fun, but you had to go with your dudes to avoid problems. Another was more upscals where the field were smoking hot but didn't dance with guys they didn't know. The last one served great fried fish sandwiches, but if you looked at somebody sideways (or if they THOUGHT you did), you'd find yourself on a platter cold with no sides.

    I don't go out anymore.
    I remember as a teenager, like 17 I went with my cousin Hal to all of these underground joints around Columbus where you had to knock on the door and tell who you knew to get in. LOL!

  34. #384
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    Yup. I remember the nightly body-bag count on the CBS News with Walter Cronkite, the one we watched.

    Sure, you can get shot just looking at a cop now, but I think the violence is a bit overstated. The fact is, violence has been on a steady decline over the last decade. Bad economic times does that.
    Oh it was bad with me. Back in around 1967-68 after watching the news I would go to bed wondering if our house would be bombed. That's how this 7 year old kid was thinking during those days. The riots didn't scare me, but Vietnam did.

  35. #385
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I remember as a teenager, like 17 I went with my cousin Hal to all of these underground joints around Columbus where you had to knock on the door and tell who you knew to get in. LOL!
    Trust me when I say that you don't want to do that here these days. These fools are out of their ******* minds. They'll shoot you because they like hearing the sound that the gun makes.

  36. #386
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    You are sadly mistaken. The U.S. is seething with racism, and I hear it and see it virtually every single day! You go to L.A., but go to "small-town USA" and you will see and hear a lot worse!
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    I definitely agree with you. I only mentioned that it isn't as bad as it was 65 years ago. Of course it is still very bad. That's one of the main reasons why I am uncomfortable there.

  37. #387
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Trust me when I say that you don't want to do that here these days. These fools are out of their ******* minds. They'll shoot you because they like hearing the sound that the gun makes.
    Oh I am sure. That's how Brooklyn was in the 80s. My Columbus experience happened in the late 70s. It was different then.

  38. #388
    I remember hanging out over my friend's house until the early hours of Saturday morning when I was in high school. He lived about two miles from me. I went to visit his parents one day in the '90s and wondered if I'd survive the experience. I wouldn't drive down that street in the daytime, let alone walk down it at night. I honestly remember not being afraid when I was just minding my own business. That was a pleasant time of life.

  39. #389
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember hanging out over my friend's house until the early hours of Saturday morning when I was in high school. He lived about two miles from me. I went to visit his parents one day in the '90s and wondered if I'd survive the experience. I wouldn't drive down that street in the daytime, let alone walk down it at night. I honestly remember not being afraid when I was just minding my own business. That was a pleasant time of life.
    Times and places have really changed in the last 25 years or so. Long Island has always been on the safe side for the most part.

  40. #390
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    You know that like I do. But the editors of the news divisions at CBS, ABC, NBC, CNN, MSNBC, and (of course Faux) can't take the time to check facts. They buy the FOP, PBA, and National Sheriffs' Association narrative that calling for an end to police brutality is the same as declaring a "war on police". SMH.
    As far as I can see, only Faux is doing that.

    One great thing about living today is we have access to the truth if we want to take the time to research it. God forbid the fact that policing is much safer in 2015 than it's ever been be known to the masses. But that's probably fodder for another thread... Sorry, y'all.
    The downside of today is that, even though we now have the tools to research everything ourselves, the results can still come up smelling like partisan crap. People only research the viewpoints that coincide with their own. At least in the old days, you had one or two central news agencies, and things weren't so politically influenced. In the old days, you would have never had a major school history text book saying that U.S. slaves were "imported workers".

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Trust me when I say that you don't want to do that here these days. These fools are out of their ******* minds. They'll shoot you because they like hearing the sound that the gun makes.
    fucking...OK, I was just testing to see if you did that or they are now censoring cuss words here.

    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    I definitely agree with you. I only mentioned that it isn't as bad as it was 65 years ago. Of course it is still very bad. That's one of the main reasons why I am uncomfortable there.
    No, it's not as violent, but the attitudes and institutional racism is still all there, and it's just as bad. Trust me.
    Last edited by soulster; 10-11-2015 at 04:23 PM.

  41. #391
    Ok , now tell me if you guys remember these...................

    Attachment 10260

    Attachment 10262
    Last edited by marv2; 10-11-2015 at 06:10 PM.

  42. #392
    Oh yeah and they came with a whistle in the box. LOL!

    Attachment 10261

  43. #393
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Ok , now tell me if you guys remember these...................

    Attachment 10260

    Attachment 10262
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    Yes, PF Flyers. I had Joe Lapchick's basketball shoes - or were those from a different shoe company?

  44. #394
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    As far as I can see, only Faux is doing that.
    I count the other networks for allowing them to make blatantly untrue proclamations without fact checking them. Every time a cop is killed, some sheriff pops up and says that Black Lives Matter has declared a war against them, knowing full well that we're on a years long downtrend of violence vs. police. This information is available, but by giving them a pulpit without vetting the lie, they are culpable (in my opinion). Faux News takes it further by bringing on apologists and blatant propagandists, but mainstream media in general is unsympathetic to the cause.

  45. #395
    Who could forget 'caramel coated peanuts, popcorn, and a prize. That's what you get with Cracker Jack.'


  46. #396
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Who could forget 'caramel coated peanuts, popcorn, and a prize. That's what you get with Cracker Jack.'


    Every Sat at the barbershop waiting for your turn it was Cracker Jack time! LOL!

  47. #397
    When you weren't smacking on Cracker Jack, you were probably blowing bubbles and chewing...........

    Attachment 10267

    Attachment 10268

  48. #398
    Well, if you're going there, do you remember candy dots...

    Wax pop bottles...

    And candy bracelets...?

  49. #399
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Well, if you're going there, do you remember candy dots...

    Wax pop bottles...

    And candy bracelets...?

    You left out the candy cigarettes! LOL! Yes I remember all those.

  50. #400
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Ok , now tell me if you guys remember these...................

    Attachment 10260
    I wore Converse, or the cheap ones from K-Mart, but I didn't like the hi-tops. They made my ankles itch, and it was usually too hot outside to wear them.

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