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Thread: Remember when?

  1. #501
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    ......remember when every mom had one of those black iron frying pans and the great fried foods that came from em?
    And they didn't use that nasty canola oil, either! They used that little can of bacon fat they kept on the stove.

  2. #502
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    And they didn't use that nasty canola oil, either! They used that little can of bacon fat they kept on the stove.
    My mom still has hers! That thing is indestructable! It has to be over 50 years old.

  3. #503
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    And they didn't use that nasty canola oil, either! They used that little can of bacon fat they kept on the stove.
    That is so funny what you said about the little can of bacon fat on the stove. My grandma Rosie use to do that. LOL!!!

  4. #504
    Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa..my dear wife has a can on top of the stove too...god bless em all!!!

  5. #505
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa..my dear wife has a can on top of the stove too...god bless em all!!!
    Definitely. Those women are the salt of the Earth!

  6. #506
    Remember when[computers]were those big bulky things in science fiction movies?

  7. #507
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when[computers]were those big bulky things in science fiction movies?
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    Remember when there were no computers (except The Enigma Machine, and people didn't have TVs in their houses, and they listened to radio dramas and comedies?

    Yes, I remember those old black frying pans. They were great for hitting burglars on the head. We didn't use bacon fat. We used schmaltz. I remember when people didn't have clothes dryers and garbage disposals. And we burned trash in an incinerator and shoveled coal into a furnace (I used to do that).

  8. #508
    I remember my grandmother hanging clothes on the clothes line to dry. Her sheets were soft and used to smell so good when I stayed with her. I also remember the wringer she used to get most of the water out before hanging them.


  9. #509
    Hey jerry i thing that[greasy grady]still uses on of those to make[lasania]hehehehe!!

  10. #510
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    Both my grandmothers grew up in the 1880s and 1890s, when there were no airplanes, nor even autos. They each drove a horse and wagon, for work, one for deliveries for her father's butcher shop in Den Haag, in The Netherlands, and the other for her father's grocery store in Haarlem, in The Netherlands. From 1972 through 2007, I lived in my great grandfather's house (where my grandfather grew up), in Den Haag (The Hague). The house was built in 1882. It had a courtyard behind, and behind that was a row of horse stables, where car garages stand in more modern situations in North America. The house has a large wood cabinet, lined with metal, and has a heavy metal door, with a latch handle. resembling a safe door. This was an ice box, used before refrigerators were widespread. The ice man used to come in his ice wagon, and carry a big block of ice up the stairs and plop it into the box, and people then put their perishable food next to it. The house had retrofitted electricity, new, better piping, and a retrofitted garbage disposal. We had a washing machine, but no dryer. I still hung my wash on the line, and still do today, at my homes in The Netherlands, Denmark and Germany. I DO use dryers when I'm staying in Winnipeg, Chicago or L.A. I use bicycles only in Europe. I do still have a car in L.A., and use my sister's car in Manitoba (but don't enjoy driving cars).

  11. #511
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember my grandmother hanging clothes on the clothes line to dry. Her sheets were soft and used to smell so good when I stayed with her. I also remember the wringer she used to get most of the water out before hanging them.

    We used a modern washer, of course, but, there's nothing like clothes dried on the line in the sun blowing in the breeze. Achoooooo!

  12. #512
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    We used a modern washer, of course, but, there's nothing like clothes dried on the line in the sun blowing in the breeze. Achoooooo!
    I can remember us running through the billowing sheets playing hide and seek at one point as children.

  13. #513
    Hah! Remember playing tag, hide-and-go-seek, and Mother May I? In the summer, we'd lock the games until midnight. We'd pick the first player up by playing "one potato, two potato".

  14. #514
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Hah! Remember playing tag, hide-and-go-seek, and Mother May I? In the summer, we'd lock the games until midnight. We'd pick the first player up by playing "one potato, two potato".
    All of those plus "Red, light, green light, Go", "I Spy" and "Freeze tag" Jerry did you grow up in Ohio? Then some of these should be remembered by you. All kids needed was a bit of freedom and their imaginations and we came up with some of the most fun and FREE games ever.

  15. #515
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember my grandmother hanging clothes on the clothes line to dry. Her sheets were soft and used to smell so good when I stayed with her. I also remember the wringer she used to get most of the water out before hanging them.

    Yep Jerry, this one is similar to the one Grandma Willa Mae had. LOL!


    Attachment 10482

  16. #516
    My Grandma's sister, Aunt Pete use to make us homemade ice cream with one of these:

    Attachment 10483

  17. #517
    Yep, right here in Columbus. When I got to junior high, we came up with things like pencil plucking (where we'd smack the back of each other's hands or knuckles with a pencil one at a time until it hurt too bad to continue). We also did he same thing by plucking hands with our fingers. We also played paper football, penny hockey, and quarter basketball at lunch time and during study hall.

    In Columbus, we also played a horrible game called "bebogies". In bebogies, any player who used a word starting with letter B was subject to being punched in the back and chest until he realized what was going on and said The name of the game. It was brutal and suffice it to say, painful. But it was fun to play.

  18. #518
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Yep, right here in Columbus. When I got to junior high, we came up with things like pencil plucking (where we'd smack the back of each other's hands or knuckles with a pencil one at a time until it hurt too bad to continue). We also did he same thing by plucking hands with our fingers. We also played paper football, penny hockey, and quarter basketball at lunch time and during study hall.

    In Columbus, we also played a horrible game called "bebogies". In bebogies, any player who used a word starting with letter B was subject to being punched in the back and chest until he realized what was going on and said The name of the game. It was brutal and suffice it to say, painful. But it was fun to play.
    We use to play the card game "Knuckles" where you thump the losers knuckles with the full deck as hard as possible to they were red and if you were really brutal, until you drew blood. LOL! Yeah guys played similar games as us in Detroit and Toledo.
    What about eraser tag when the teacher left the room for a moment?

  19. #519
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    Did any of you have a Flexi-Flyer?

  20. #520
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    We use to play the card game "Knuckles" where you thump the losers knuckles with the full deck as hard as possible to they were red and if you were really brutal, until you drew blood. LOL! Yeah guys played similar games as us in Detroit and Toledo.
    What about eraser tag when the teacher left the room for a moment?
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    Ha! Ha! I bet they didn't play "Knuckles" in Catholic Schools! Their knuckles were already bloody from nuns hitting them on the knuckles with rulers!

    We didn't play "knuckles". Although many of the tough Ukes had a brass set for gang fights after school.

    We didn't play eraser tag. We just threw them at each other. But, if the teacher was careless enough to walk out of the room to speak to another adult while class was in session, we took the opportunity to put thumbtacks on his or her chair, sticking upward. Or, if we knew it would take 2-3 minutes, one of us would stand on a chair or table, and turn the clock ahead one hour. We ALMOST got to leave early one day, but the teacher figured out it was NOT dismissal time.

    But we played "Flinch". One kid would swing a fist at another, and if he flinched, he would get hit hard in the shoulder 2 times. It accelerated to 3 hits before I entered high school, where we were too grown-up and sophisticated for that sort of little kids' game.

  21. #521
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    How many of you had a Red Ryder B.B. Gun?

  22. #522
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Did any of you have a Flexi-Flyer?
    I had a sled like this, if not by this maker. My favorite toys as a small kid were Radio Flyer wagons, Tonka Trucks, and Tinker Toys.

  23. #523
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    How many of you had a Red Ryder B.B. Gun?
    I can't remember if they were Redy Ryder BB guns, but we had BB Guns that looked like the one on the box here. Great memories for sure!

  24. #524
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I had a sled like this, if not by this maker. My favorite toys as a small kid were Radio Flyer wagons, Tonka Trucks, and Tinker Toys.
    I had one of those but mine had blue paint on it.

  25. #525
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Ha! Ha! I bet they didn't play "Knuckles" in Catholic Schools! Their knuckles were already bloody from nuns hitting them on the knuckles with rulers!

    We didn't play "knuckles". Although many of the tough Ukes had a brass set for gang fights after school.

    We didn't play eraser tag. We just threw them at each other. But, if the teacher was careless enough to walk out of the room to speak to another adult while class was in session, we took the opportunity to put thumbtacks on his or her chair, sticking upward. Or, if we knew it would take 2-3 minutes, one of us would stand on a chair or table, and turn the clock ahead one hour. We ALMOST got to leave early one day, but the teacher figured out it was NOT dismissal time.

    But we played "Flinch". One kid would swing a fist at another, and if he flinched, he would get hit hard in the shoulder 2 times. It accelerated to 3 hits before I entered high school, where we were too grown-up and sophisticated for that sort of little kids' game.
    Oh we had eraser fights, food fights in the cafeteria in high school. I don't know if I can mention all of the "devilment" we got into on this here forum , but trust me we had our share fun in bounds and out of bounds LOL!!!

  26. #526
    Remember when you gang would say...lucky? And if you say[strike]you would get punched?

  27. #527
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when you gang would say...lucky? And if you say[strike]you would get punched?
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    Yes! We had that.

  28. #528
    A few weeks ago I posted a pic of what kids typically looked like on Halloween during the mid-sixties. Well today, the Toledo Blade newspaper reprinted a pic of some kids I actually knew that lived in my neighborhood out Trick or Treating Halloween night in 1963! My brother and I was out there too, but the paper must have missed us LOL! It rained that night but it did not stop us. Hard to believe that these kids are now 60, 56 and 57 years old now respectively...............

    Attachment 10492

  29. #529
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    A few weeks ago I posted a pic of what kids typically looked like on Halloween during the mid-sixties. Well today, the Toledo Blade newspaper reprinted a pic of some kids I actually knew that lived in my neighborhood out Trick or Treating Halloween night in 1963! My brother and I was out there too, but the paper must have missed us LOL! It rained that night but it did not stop us. Hard to believe that these kids are now 60, 56 and 57 years old now respectively...............

    Attachment 10492
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    Nice to see Uncle Scrooge getting some love from Americans even if that was 52 years ago. I make my money writing and drawing stories about him, and very few of those reach USA.

    Here's a drawing of mine of him:
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-27-2015 at 02:30 AM.

  30. #530
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Nice to see Uncle Scrooge getting some love from Americans even if that was 52 years ago. I make my money writing and drawing stories about him, and very few of those reach USA.

    Here's a drawing of mine of him:
    That's a fantastic drawing, robb_k. Where can I see some more of your stuff?

  31. #531
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    That's a fantastic drawing, robb_k. Where can I see some more of your stuff?
    Unfortunately, the place I had the most uploaded (Disney Comics Forum) is now down. Also, The Disney Comics Artists' pages are down, as well (a related problem). Here are a few more drawings of mine:
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-27-2015 at 11:17 PM.

  32. #532
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    That's a fantastic drawing, robb_k. Where can I see some more of your stuff?
    Unfortunately, the place I had the most uploaded (Disney Comics Forum) is now down. Also, The Disney Comics Artists' pages are down, as well (a related problem). Here are a few more drawings of mine:


    Last edited by robb_k; 10-27-2015 at 03:33 AM.

  33. #533
    Here's half a page of a comic book story:

  34. #534
    I drew this back when people still had phonographs:
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-27-2015 at 04:02 AM.

  35. #535
    Here's an idea for a magazine cover:

  36. #536
    Here's an advert for a personal drawing/autograph session I did with 2 of my Dutch Disney colleagues at a comics shop in Eindhoven, Netherlands a few months ago. It shows a few drawings for each of the artists.

  37. #537
    In a rather small, very narrow box:

    Attachment 10500

    Wasn't crazy about them. We pronounced it Joo-Joo-Bees; others say Joo-Joobs. Still a somewhat controversial issue to this day. I much preferred their larger relative Jujyfruits.

  38. #538
    Wow, wow, wow Robb!

  39. #539
    Quote Originally Posted by Methuselah2 View Post
    In a rather small, very narrow box:

    Attachment 10500

    Wasn't crazy about them. We pronounced it Joo-Joo-Bees; others say Joo-Joobs. Still a somewhat controversial issue to this day. I much preferred their larger relative Jujyfruits.
    I remember them of course, but like you I didn't care for Jujubes much for some reason. Got caught in my teeth a lot.

  40. #540
    I did like these.....................

    Attachment 10502

  41. #541
    Simply excellent illustrations, Robb!

    Jujubes...the name is familiar to me, but they look like what we would call Fruit or Wine Gums here in the UK...and yes Marv, they do get caught (and stuck on AND in) the teeth a lot, LOL.

    If they come sugar-coated, we know them as Fruit Pastilles....black ones are my favourites. Or maybe that should be 'flavourites'.....

    Imported Mallo Cups are available in UK....bet they don't taste as they once did. Nothing I've tried recently just for fun comes close to the way they once were in my youth. For a start, they all seem to have been reduced in size.
    Last edited by westgrandboulevard; 10-27-2015 at 06:18 AM.

  42. #542
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    a few weeks ago i posted a pic of what kids typically looked like on halloween during the mid-sixties. Well today, the toledo blade newspaper reprinted a pic of some kids i actually knew that lived in my neighborhood out trick or treating halloween night in 1963! My brother and i was out there too, but the paper must have missed us lol! It rained that night but it did not stop us. Hard to believe that these kids are now 60, 56 and 57 years old now respectively...............

    Attachment 10492
    hey marv,some folks in da hood still dress like that.

  43. #543
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    hey marv,some folks in da hood still dress like that.


    hehehehehehehehehehehehehe........................ ....!

  44. #544
    Quote Originally Posted by westgrandboulevard View Post
    Jujubes...the name is familiar to me, but they look like what we would call Fruit or Wine Gums here in the UK...and yes Marv, they do get caught (and stuck on AND in) the teeth a lot, LOL.

    If they come sugar-coated, we know them as Fruit Pastilles....black ones are my favourites. Or maybe that should be 'flavourites'.....

    Imported Mallo Cups are available in UK....bet they don't taste as they once did. Nothing I've tried recently just for fun comes close to the way they once were in my youth. For a start, they all seem to have been reduced in size.
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    I can't join in any conversations about candy, as I've never really eaten any. I think someone gave me a piece of hard candy at age 3, and I didn't like it at all. I never even tried hard candy ever again. I've only eaten chocolate candy maybe twice. I didn't care about it. I never cared much for sweets (lucky me!). I DID eat tonnes of ice cream, however, from age 9 through 15 or so, after being allergic to milk from age 1 to 9, and being denied that pleasure. I used to eat a half-gallon at each sitting. eating less wasn't worth the bother.

    I DO, however, remember when the big Hershey Bars were only a nickel! THOSE were the good Ol' days, eh?
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-28-2015 at 08:35 PM.

  45. #545
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Both my grandmothers grew up in the 1880s and 1890s, when there were no airplanes, nor even autos. They each drove a horse and wagon, for work, one for deliveries for her father's butcher shop in Den Haag, in The Netherlands, and the other for her father's grocery store in Haarlem, in The Netherlands. From 1972 through 2007, I lived in my great grandfather's house (where my grandfather grew up), in Den Haag (The Hague). The house was built in 1882. It had a courtyard behind, and behind that was a row of horse stables, where car garages stand in more modern situations in North America. The house has a large wood cabinet, lined with metal, and has a heavy metal door, with a latch handle. resembling a safe door. This was an ice box, used before refrigerators were widespread. The ice man used to come in his ice wagon, and carry a big block of ice up the stairs and plop it into the box, and people then put their perishable food next to it. The house had retrofitted electricity, new, better piping, and a retrofitted garbage disposal. We had a washing machine, but no dryer. I still hung my wash on the line, and still do today, at my homes in The Netherlands, Denmark and Germany. I DO use dryers when I'm staying in Winnipeg, Chicago or L.A. I use bicycles only in Europe. I do still have a car in L.A., and use my sister's car in Manitoba (but don't enjoy driving cars).
    I thought when you write Den Hagg is actually supposed to be s-Gravenhage.

  46. #546
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    I drew this back when people still had phonographs:
    Shhhh!!! They still do!

  47. #547
    Quote Originally Posted by MotownSteve View Post
    I thought when you write Den Hagg is actually supposed to be s-Gravenhage.
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    " 's Gravenhage " is the OFFICIAL title of the city, which contains The government offices and Parliament of The Netherlands, and is called "The Hague" in English language. But the common name for that city, to Netherlanders (Nederlanders) is "Den Haag (whether in speech OR in writing).

    It is the same with Den Bosch. The official name is "Hertogenbosch". But people refer to it as Den Bosch.

    's Gravenhage refers to "The Count's hedge". Graaf means "Count" in Dutch. In the early 13th Century, The Count of Holland was the Governor of North and South Holland under The Dukes of Burgundy. Originally, Den Haag was built to serve as a country home for The Count, with a "haga" ( "hedge" in English) that was an enclosed hunting area for The Count's recreation.
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-28-2015 at 09:16 PM.

  48. #548
    Thanks for the clarification.

  49. #549
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    Shhhh!!! They still do!
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    Yes, sound system afficianados and old fogies like me (and R&B fans from way back) do. But, the typical layman and youthful Disney Comics fan in Europe does NOT. So, that cover CANNOT be used on a new magazine in Europe (and hasn't been able to be used since about 1985 or so.) In USA, it probably COULD be used, as the only (traditional) Disney Comic books ("Mickey Mouse", "Donald Duck", "Uncle Scrooge" and "Walt Disney's Comics and Stories") are bought almost exclusively by about 5,000 55 years old to 75 years old nostalgists, who started buying these books in the 1940s and 1950s. They are only sold in highly specialised comic book shops in USA and Canada. However, in the late 1940s and early 1950s, they sold over 5 million books, and were the highest circulation of magazines of ANY type, ever sold! They were omnipresent on newsstands and on shelves in grocery stores and drugstores. They are still sold in mass media outlets in Europe (grocery stores, drugstores, discount stores and book stores. They are still a mass sales item in Europe. But no children I know in The Netherlands (other than the grandchildren of a nostalgic record collector) would know what a phonograph is, just as the average 5 to 14 year old in USA and Canada would not.

  50. #550
    Not only do they not know about the phonograph,i've talked to college kids who never heard of the temptations and thought that a[45]was that big gun that dirty harry used.

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