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  1. #1

    Soundexchange.com

    Is anyone familiar with Soundexchange.com? It's my understanding they pay singers and songwriters for songs played on YouTube and the internet in general. It not limited to singers, its for backgound singers, musicians, the spoken word, everybody it seems but publishers. Visit the site and let me know what you think. If you are a part of it, is it legit?

    Lorraine Chandler

  2. #2
    It would be very worth your while to check it out.
    Trust me, I have been with them for years, my,my,my
    Ceasar

  3. #3
    I know nothing about them, but coincidentally, this was in one of the trade papers yesterday. After reading the article, I am guessing that they are an organization that collects fees distributing down streamed music. They get to keep the money they do not distribute. And if the artist doesn't register - or register properly - then they keep the money.

    Sounds like Caeser has first hand knowledge on how they operate

    SoundExchange, CD Baby want to pay $1 million in royalties
    25 October, 2011
    SoundExchange, the non-profit performance rights organization authorized to collect royalties for the digital performance of sound recordings, and CD Baby, an online music store and digital distributor, announced an initiative to notify hundreds of recording artists owed back royalties totaling more than $1 million. To encourage artists and labels to claim these royalties, the groups matched SoundExchange’s list of yet-unregistered artists and labels to CD Baby’s database of members. The exercise identified 12,806 recording artists and 1,574 labels with unclaimed funds at SoundExchange.

    In mid-September, SoundExchange announced there were some 6,126 AFTRA member artists owed a cumulative $3.6 million in back royalties which have been collected on their behalf by SoundExchange for digital streaming of their recordings.

    This week, CD Baby began sending emails to all matched artists and labels, explaining the royalties and encouraging them to register with SoundExchange to get paid. The match, which the organizations want to make an annual event.

    Federal copyright law allows music services that digitally stream sound recordings under the government’s blanket license, provided they pay royalties and provide playlists to SoundExchange. SoundExchange says many artists and labels don’t know about the law that entitles them to royalties, and as a result to don’t register to collect the payments from SoundExchange.

    “The reason that CD Baby exists is to make it easy for independent artists to get paid for their hard work,” said Brian Felsen President of CD Baby. “That’s why we’re excited to help our artists claim their royalties through SoundExchange. Nothing makes us happier than to see new revenue streams flowing to independent musicians.”

    Meanwhile, SoundExchange announced 10/25 it has distributed nearly $88 million to more than 18,300 payees designated by recording artists and labels during Q3. The quarterly distribution, SoundExchange's largest to date, includes royalties paid by Internet radio, satellite radio and cable TV music-only channels. Total distributions made by SoundExchange in 2010 were $249.2 million, up from $155.5 million in 2009.


  4. #4
    Isn't this wonderful. People looking to pay us! My thanks to Carl Dixon of the U.K. for the sharing the info with me. It's on us now!

    Lorraine

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