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  1. #1

    Diana's 90s singles

    I have to say that I really don't spend much time listening to her Motown II period [[i'm including WO as part of the "90s" even though it was released in 89). but i will admit there were a lot of solid songs. IMO she was struggling with a pretty apathetic public in the US - people here just didn't really care about her. But she also seemed to focus on lead singles from the albums that just don't have broad appeal

    When You Tell Me - certainly a pretty song but it's nowhere near Its My Turn or TMITM. nor is it a mega-power ballad being done by the divas at the time. IMO it's just too innocuous.

    Force Behind and Take Me Higher - both of these tunes were just too much of "message" tunes to really have broad appeal. 99.9% of the hits are about love or breakups. that's what people relate to.

    WO - yikes. just leaving it there lol

    I think the strongest potential lead singles from each of the albums would have been:

    Bottom Line

    You're Gonna Love it

    If you're not gonna love me right

    Not over you yet


    it also could have been a good idea to have her do remixes of the tunes. Like what Whitney did with My Love Is Your Love.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    I have to say that I really don't spend much time listening to her Motown II period [[i'm including WO as part of the "90s" even though it was released in 89). but i will admit there were a lot of solid songs. IMO she was struggling with a pretty apathetic public in the US - people here just didn't really care about her. But she also seemed to focus on lead singles from the albums that just don't have broad appeal

    When You Tell Me - certainly a pretty song but it's nowhere near Its My Turn or TMITM. nor is it a mega-power ballad being done by the divas at the time. IMO it's just too innocuous.

    Force Behind and Take Me Higher - both of these tunes were just too much of "message" tunes to really have broad appeal. 99.9% of the hits are about love or breakups. that's what people relate to.

    WO - yikes. just leaving it there lol

    I think the strongest potential lead singles from each of the albums would have been:

    Bottom Line

    You're Gonna Love it

    If you're not gonna love me right

    Not over you yet


    it also could have been a good idea to have her do remixes of the tunes. Like what Whitney did with My Love Is Your Love.
    “When You Tell Me That You Love Me” is one of Diana’s signature songs of the 90’s. A massive hit in the UK and Ireland twice over, to include the duet with Westlife. It’s now more recognised than “Its My Turn”.
    “Your Love” and “Not Over You Yet” were top hits, with “FBTP” a reasonable hit.
    By the 90’s the USA were through with Diana Ross. Nothing she released, no matter how commercial was ever going to hit.
    Allowing for the mess of single releases in the USA with FBTP, i think unlike the 80’s, the 90’s lead singles were pretty good.

  3. #3
    Diana Ross was still quite popular in the UK throughout the 1990s, with all 13 of her "new" singles making the UK top 40, plus returns to the chart for "I'm Still Waiting" [#21 via a remix], "Chain Reaction" [#20 for 3 weeks] and "Why Do Fools Fall In Love"/"I'm Coming Out" [remix] [#36].

    "When You Tell Me That You Love Me" was of course a huge hit reaching #2 and spending 7 weeks in the top 10. "One Shining Moment" also made the top 10 and "If We Hold On Together" just missed, peaking at #11 and spending 6 weeks in the top 20.

    "Your Love" was another big hit during the holiday season of 1993 reaching #14.

    In 1996 she broke the top 20 again with "I Will Survive" [The first Diana Ross single I ever purchased myself at age 14, after seeing her perform the song on Top of the Pops].

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-OmHHFcsuQ

    Later the same year she returned to Top of the Pops to perform a new single "In The Ones You Love" and I bought that too [#34], loved it so much that I bought the "Voice Of Love" and "Take Me Higher" CDs for myself that Christmas.

    She returned to the top 10 a final time in 1999 with "Not Over You Yet". In the meantime I had picked up "40 Golden Motown Greats", "One Woman: The Ultimate Collection", "Motown's Greatest Hits" and "The Force Behind The Power".

    Therefore I offer myself as an example of a teenage record buyer who liked her 1990s singles so much I was encouraged to buy more and more of her music, and continued to in the years since on the strength of those latter day singles and TV appearances.
    Last edited by Motown Love; 06-16-2024 at 09:41 PM.

  4. #4
    I don't have a problem with most of Diana's 90s singles. I just think the US didn't know what to do and sometimes released them in the wrong order.

    For example, when Diana appeared on Arsenio Hall and VIDEO SOUL debuting THE FORCE BEHIND THE POWER, one would have thought it was the first single. Instead a few months later, Motown released WYTMTYLM. And then...nothing until a maxi-single and 12" of YOU"RE GONNA LOVE IT, eventually followed by a remix of WAITING IN THE WINGS.
    Meanwhile, the UK is regularly releasing singles and they are doing well.

    When it came to TAKE ME HIGHER, I like the title track. But again, I feel Motown released the wrong second single. They went with GONE, which I love but not as a second single. I think they should have gone with IF YOU'RE NOT GONNA LOVE ME RIGHT, VOICE OF THE HEART, and then GONE. I would have thrown I WILL SURVIVE somewhere in there as well, especially after the Super Bowl performance, plus it was added to the soundtrack for the film IN & OUT. But I understand Chantay Savage also had a version out and maybe that influenced Motown's decision not to go with it, even though its video was being shown a lot.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Motown Love View Post
    Diana Ross was still quite popular in the UK throughout the 1990s, with all 13 of her "new" singles making the UK top 40, plus returns to the chart for "I'm Still Waiting" [#21 via a remix], "Chain Reaction" [#20 for 3 weeks] and "Why Do Fools Fall In Love"/"I'm Coming Out" [remix] [#36].

    "When You Tell Me That You Love Me" was of course a huge hit reaching #2 and spending 7 weeks in the top 10. "One Shining Moment" also made the top 10 and "If We Hold On Together" just missed, peaking at #11 and spending 6 weeks in the top 20.

    "Your Love" was another big hit during the holiday season of 1993 reaching #14.

    In 1996 she broke the top 20 again with "I Will Survive" [The first Diana Ross single I ever purchased myself at age 14, after seeing her perform the song on Top of the Pops].

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-OmHHFcsuQ

    Later the same year she returned to Top of the Pops to perform a new single "In The Ones You Love" and I bought that too [#34], loved it so much that I bought the "Voice Of Love" and "Take Me Higher" CDs for myself that Christmas.

    She returned to the top 10 a final time in 1999 with "Not Over You Yet". In the meantime I had picked up "40 Golden Motown Greats", "One Woman: The Ultimate Collection", "Motown's Greatest Hits" and "The Force Behind The Power".

    Therefore I offer myself as an example of a teenage record buyer who liked her 1990s singles so much I was encouraged to buy more and more of her music, and continued to in the years since on the strength of those latter day singles and TV appearances.
    I found your time line fascinating ML. Out of curiosity , did you know at age 14 that I WILL SURVIVE was a remake of an old song from almost 20 years prior? ....did you know who had already done it?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    I found your time line fascinating ML. Out of curiosity , did you know at age 14 that I WILL SURVIVE was a remake of an old song from almost 20 years prior? ....did you know who had already done it?
    Thank you Boogiedown, I think I knew. It certainly seemed familiar but we only had 4 TV channels and no internet back then. I am fairly sure I didn't know who Gloria Gaynor was until I was an adult. When I first saw the I WILL SURVIVE video I didn't know they were drag queens, thought they must be the Supremes until my late brother, who was a Nirvana fan told me who Rupaul was.
    Last edited by Motown Love; 06-17-2024 at 05:41 PM.

  7. #7
    in another thread, someone wrote that they thought Diana was always about 2 years too late with picking producers. that she did select hot ones but that their period of peak influence might have been declining.

    the Force Behind the Power content might have been just the answer back in 89 when she was attempting to do WO. and Take Me Higher seemed a bit out of date too when it was finally released.

    I've wondered if maybe doing a movie theme or something might have helped re-energize her US career. and no - not the theme to Land Before Time lol. doing the song to some big summer blockbuster. something with a strong "cool" factor

  8. #8
    The Force Behind The Power was her biggest selling studio album ever in the UK, reaching #11, spending 31 weeks on the charts and selling over half a million copies. It is her only BPI Platinum certified studio set, and her only album to produce 5 top 40 hit singles.

    Additionally, One Woman: The Ultimate Collection was released in 1993 and was the 5th biggest selling album in the UK that year, hitting the top of the album chart twice and spending 84 weeks in the UK top 100. This album included 5 of her 1990s hit singles [Your Love and The Best Years Of My Life were released during this album's chart run].

    Take Me Higher [album] opened at #10 on the UK album chart but dropped off the chart after just 4 weeks. Still, it included 3 top 40 singles.

    I never knew about her US chart fortunes until the early 2000s and was surprised to learn that her record success in America basically tanked in 1985, even Chain Reaction bombed there. I had a British Hit Singles book that showed which songs were US number ones so I knew that from 1964 - 1981 she was white hot and the book clearly showed her to be the top female artist, at least in terms of chart stats if not actual record sales, until Madonna eventually overtook her.

    Every Day Is A New Day failed to make any impact here despite a top 10 single and TV special which featured performances of the new hit and He Lives In You. I won't comment on why as I wouldn't know but when my late father heard me playing Someone That You Loved Before he came into the room and asked who was it was singing. He was never a fan of Diana Ross and was very surprised when I told him.
    Last edited by Motown Love; 06-18-2024 at 08:10 PM.

  9. #9
    I have always found it odd why the slightly vanilla FBTP album was so well received in the UK, while imo the superior TMH set remained far less successful.
    Perhaps at this stage the casual fan preferred Diana in more of a pop/adult contemporary setting then r&b influenced material. Was the image she was trying to project with TMH just a little overly youthful for a woman in her mid 50’s?.
    All are possibilities.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    I have always found it odd why the slightly vanilla FBTP album was so well received in the UK, while imo the superior TMH set remained far less successful.
    Perhaps at this stage the casual fan preferred Diana in more of a pop/adult contemporary setting then r&b influenced material. Was the image she was trying to project with TMH just a little overly youthful for a woman in her mid 50’s?.
    All are possibilities.
    Force Behind The Power had 5 hit singles and was promoted as an album of love songs. It was also seen as a comeback as she had only managed one top 40 hit since Chain Reaction five years earlier. Her TV appearances at the time, especially the Royal Variety Show came across very well.

    Take Me Higher followed the biggest selling UK album of her career [One Woman] and the new singles simply did not appeal to the wider public as much. For a short time there was a HMV box set that included both One Woman and Take Me Higher, but other than a short burst of success for I Will Survive, plugged on The National Lottery and seen by everyone who purchased a lottery ticket that week the album and other singles simply did not catch on in the way that Force Behind The Power and it's singles did.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Motown Love View Post
    Force Behind The Power had 5 hit singles and was promoted as an album of love songs. It was also seen as a comeback as she had only managed one top 40 hit since Chain Reaction five years earlier. Her TV appearances at the time, especially the Royal Variety Show came across very well.

    Take Me Higher followed the biggest selling UK album of her career [One Woman] and the new singles simply did not appeal to the wider public as much. For a short time there was a HMV box set that included both One Woman and Take Me Higher, but other than a short burst of success for I Will Survive, plugged on The National Lottery and seen by everyone who purchased a lottery ticket that week the album and other singles simply did not catch on in the way that Force Behind The Power and it's singles did.
    So what went wrong. Were the songs on TMH simply not as strong as those on FBTP. She was certainly very popular in the UK at that point in time, with “Take Me Higher”
    being a commercial, radio friendly lead single.
    Perhaps the UK public associated with her more wearing long frocks and singing ballads as opposed prancing around in a miniskirt to an uptempo number.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    So what went wrong. Were the songs on TMH simply not as strong as those on FBTP. She was certainly very popular in the UK at that point in time, with “Take Me Higher”
    being a commercial, radio friendly lead single.
    Perhaps the UK public associated with her more wearing long frocks and singing ballads as opposed prancing around in a miniskirt to an uptempo number.
    Interesting, but I don't know Ollie. I try to stick to the facts as much as possible and not speculate because I know that I as a fan am not impartial or able to give a fair account of why things happened the way they did. I also know that there are others who come here who know a lot more about these things than I do. What is clear is that the majority of Diana Ross fans loved Take Me Higher and preferred it to Force Behind The Power, whereas the wider public [at least in the UK] didn't.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Motown Love View Post
    Interesting, but I don't know Ollie. I try to stick to the facts as much as possible and not speculate because I know that I as a fan am not impartial or able to give a fair account of why things happened the way they did. I also know that there are others who come here who know a lot more about these things than I do. What is clear is that the majority of Diana Ross fans loved Take Me Higher and preferred it to Force Behind The Power, whereas the wider public [at least in the UK] didn't.
    Fair enough, but often speculate is all we can do.

  14. #14
    I think of Force Behind The Power as more pop sounding rather than the more soulful Take Me Higher. I much prefer Take Me Higher but understand why Force might have been more popular with more people. I wonder how much product Diana was selling due to hit records at that point, or was she just reaching her die hard, and sometimes, fans.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by thommg View Post
    I think of Force Behind The Power as more pop sounding rather than the more soulful Take Me Higher. I much prefer Take Me Higher but understand why Force might have been more popular with more people. I wonder how much product Diana was selling due to hit records at that point, or was she just reaching her die hard, and sometimes, fans.
    Diana Ross hadn't had a hit in the US since the first half of the 80s and I'm sure her album sales in the 90s reflected that. There were a few years between the pop of Force and the soul/R&B of TMH, but it may well have been an intentional pivot in styles. [There was also the jazz of Stolen Moments and Christmas in Vienna in between].

    As far back as the Supremes, I did notice what I thought were purposeful or planned shifts aimed at keeping fans and/or reaching new ones. I first noticed this with the singles I Hear a Symphony/My World Is Empty and the 180° pivot to Love Is Like an Itching/You Can't Hurry Love. Then there were the albums Supremes Sing HDH and Supremes Sing RH.

  16. #16
    Interesting discussion of FBTP vs TMH. I assumed TMH, a bit more youthful/soulful than FBTP, was disappointing to the UK market. I remember reading that EMI initially wanted Voice Of The Heart as the lead single from the project.

    Perhaps Voice may have resulted in larger success for the project.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyB View Post
    Interesting discussion of FBTP vs TMH. I assumed TMH, a bit more youthful/soulful than FBTP, was disappointing to the UK market. I remember reading that EMI initially wanted Voice Of The Heart as the lead single from the project.

    Perhaps Voice may have resulted in larger success for the project.
    Although a pretty song, i never thought “Voice Of The Heart” had much single potential.
    It is of course possible the UK were a little bored with her by 95, particularly after the huge success of “Force”, charting singles from the box set and the mega selling One Woman”” collection.
    Perhaps a duet with a famous name might have helped it along.
    Last edited by Ollie9; 06-21-2024 at 07:38 AM.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyB View Post
    Interesting discussion of FBTP vs TMH. I assumed TMH, a bit more youthful/soulful than FBTP, was disappointing to the UK market. I remember reading that EMI initially wanted Voice Of The Heart as the lead single from the project.

    Perhaps Voice may have resulted in larger success for the project.
    My guess is that Voice Of The Heart would have been more appealing to the people who bought her early 1990s singles. Maybe that's what EMI were thinking. I also agree with Ollie9 that it's possible the UK record buying public may have just tired of her by then. Coming after her best selling [UK] studio album and her best selling [UK] Greatest Hits album, as stylish as Take Me Higher was I don't think it was commercial enough to continue that level of success, nor do I think it would appeal as much to the same people who bought Force Behind The Power and One Woman: The Ultimate Collection. That being said I do think the album is one of her best and it doesn't matter to me that it wasn't a huge blockbuster success.

    The following text is from the 1998 Guinness Rockopedia: The Ultimate A-Z of Rock & Pop

    "...1994's A Very Special Season preceded the triumphant Take Me Higher [1995], which pitched the hearty, housey title track against the breathtakingly beautiful "Gone". Most commercially successful, however, was its cover of "I Will Survive" - a redundant declaration from a woman whose effervescent excellence needs no further reinforcement"

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    I have always found it odd why the slightly vanilla FBTP album was so well received in the UK, while imo the superior TMH set remained far less successful.
    Perhaps at this stage the casual fan preferred Diana in more of a pop/adult contemporary setting then r&b influenced material. Was the image she was trying to project with TMH just a little overly youthful for a woman in her mid 50’s?.
    All are possibilities.

    We will all have differing views as to the quality of the albums, Ollie but to a great degree this wasn't such an important factor in the success of FBTP in the UK.

    The stars aligned behind Diana with it.

    Diana albums rarely did spectacularly well here apart of course from the compilations the sales of which were amazing particularly as they were mostly the same tracks arranged in a different order!

    diana was a good example - on the back of Upside Down with Piano following it into the top 5 and Coming Out selling well over Christmas you'd have expected it to be a lot bigger but it was somewhat short of 200k.

    Surprisingly the Why Do Fools Fall In Love album was a bigger seller.

    Normally a big hit will fuels sales of an album but even though Chain Reaction was massive the album only struggled to #11 after only making a fleeting appearance when it was released - people were expecting songs similar to Reaction and when word got about that wasn't the case the album fell away quickly.

    Anyway, a superbly received performance at The Royal Command Performance [[aired at the end of November) catapulted When You Tell Me That You Love Me straight into the Top 10 - in those days viewing figures on TV were massive and the album started selling on the back of this.

    But this was December and though the album made #11 sales would be far higher than many #1s earlier in the year.

    I wonder though how many people bought the album for themselves? - I rather suspect that a very high percentage of those sold were bought as Christmas presents for someone else.

    The success of the radio-friendly One Shining Moment took the album back into the charts in July and then the release of If We Hold On Together ta Christmas 1992 took Force back into the top 20 again at the biggest selling period of the year.

    It sold around a quarter million in each of 1991 and1992.

    Everything just when right as regarding the Force album.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by florence View Post
    We will all have differing views as to the quality of the albums, Ollie but to a great degree this wasn't such an important factor in the success of FBTP in the UK.

    The stars aligned behind Diana with it.

    Diana albums rarely did spectacularly well here apart of course from the compilations the sales of which were amazing particularly as they were mostly the same tracks arranged in a different order!

    diana was a good example - on the back of Upside Down with Piano following it into the top 5 and Coming Out selling well over Christmas you'd have expected it to be a lot bigger but it was somewhat short of 200k.

    Surprisingly the Why Do Fools Fall In Love album was a bigger seller.

    Normally a big hit will fuels sales of an album but even though Chain Reaction was massive the album only struggled to #11 after only making a fleeting appearance when it was released - people were expecting songs similar to Reaction and when word got about that wasn't the case the album fell away quickly.

    Anyway, a superbly received performance at The Royal Command Performance [[aired at the end of November) catapulted When You Tell Me That You Love Me straight into the Top 10 - in those days viewing figures on TV were massive and the album started selling on the back of this.

    But this was December and though the album made #11 sales would be far higher than many #1s earlier in the year.

    I wonder though how many people bought the album for themselves? - I rather suspect that a very high percentage of those sold were bought as Christmas presents for someone else.

    The success of the radio-friendly One Shining Moment took the album back into the charts in July and then the release of If We Hold On Together ta Christmas 1992 took Force back into the top 20 again at the biggest selling period of the year.

    It sold around a quarter million in each of 1991 and1992.

    Everything just when right as regarding the Force album.
    It certainly helped that Diana was over here to promote Force with perfectly timed major tv appearances.
    As regards to “Take Me Higher”, i thought it a huge mistake that the superb promo video was not shown on prime time music show TOTP, with Diana performing the song live from the Motown Museum instead. What’s the point of making a great video if not used as a major marketing tool.
    Had TMH taken off it might have opened the flood gates for more hits.
    At that point in time, i do think the UK record buying public preferred Diana in more of a pop mode as opposed to r&b flavoured songs such as “”If Your Not Gonna Love Me Right”. This could certainly be one of the reasons for The greater success of Force when compared to TMH. It could also be as Motown Love pointed out that the album simply wasn’t commercial enough.

  21. #21
    Here is some info from UKMIX on Diana's chart action and sales in Japan, where "IF WE HOLD ON TOGETHER" was the biggest hit of her career and "FORCE BEHIND THE POWER" her best selling album.

    https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...harts-archives

    Diana Ross

    Ranking and sales of Diana Ross' singles and albums on the Oricon charts of Japan

    Albums

    1972/03/5 Lady sings the blues [[soundtrack) # 91, 2 weeks, 2 200 [LP]
    1973/09/25 Touch Me In The Morning # 67, 6 weeks, 8 760 [LP]
    1974/02/15 Diana & Marvin # 19, 30 weeks, 70 420 [LP]
    1974/03/10 Last Time I Saw Him # 49, 8 weeks, 13 030 [LP]
    1974/05/05 Best Collection # 67, 7 weeks, 8 840 [LP]
    1976/05/01 Diana Ross # 27, 17 weeks, 34 690 [LP]
    1978/05/25 Diana Ross # 74, 3 weeks, 4 370 [LP]
    1979/07/25 The Boss # 66, 2 weeks, 3 160 [LP]
    1980/06/21 Diana # 33, 27 weeks, 58 300 [LP]
    1981/05/21 To Love Again # 68, 5 weeks, 7 480 [LP]
    1981/11/21 Why Do Fools Fall In Love? # 28 [LP], 16 weeks, 52 380 + # 46 [CT], 13 weeks, 23 560
    1982/11/01 Silk Electric # 33 [LP], 6 weeks, 13 480 + # 81 [CT] , 1 week, 1 240
    1983/07/25 Ross # 35 [LP], 9 weeks, 20 890 + # 49 [CT], 4 weeks, 7 180
    1984/09/29 Swept Away # 32 [LP], 9 weeks, 17 740 + # 42 [CT], 7 weeks, 10 260
    1985/09/28 Eaten Alive # 24 [LP], 9 weeks, 21 670 + # 39 [CT], 5 weeks, 7 010
    1987/06/21 Red Hot Rhythm & Blues # 60 [LP], 3 weeks, 2 650 + # 73 [CD], 2 weeks, 3 240 + # 72 [CT], 3 weeks, 1 850
    1989/06/14 Workin' Overtime # 98 , 1 week, 1 040 [CD]
    1991/07/26 The Force Behind The Power # 21[CD], 15 weeks, 104 110 + # 43 [CT], 11 weeks, 6 260
    1992/03/29 That's Why I Call You My Friend # 33, 9 weeks, 67 570 [CD]
    1993/05/26 Stolen Moments # 83, 1 week, 3 800 [CD]
    1993/11/24 One Woman Ultimate Collection # 46, 5 weeks, 34 830 [CD]
    1994/12/07 A Very Special Selection # 66, 3 weeks, 19 060 [CD]
    1995/09/27 Take Me Higher # 36, 5 weeks, 39 570 [CD]
    1996/12/18 Voice Of Love # 91 , 2 weeks, 6 490 [CD]
    1997/02/05 A Gift Of Love-TV Tie-In Compilation[Japan Only] # 31, 6 weeks, 33 190 [CD]
    1999/06/09 Every Day Is A New Day # 95, 1 week, 2,670 [CD]
    2001/10/27 The Very Best Of Diana Ross-Love & Life # 22, 6 weeks, 36 170 [CD]

    Singles

    1974/02/05 You Are Everything # 82 , 7 weeks, 21 000
    1980/07/21 Upside Down # 48 , 16 weeks, 63 000
    1981/09/05 Endless Love # 33 , 23 weeks, 106 000
    1990/01/25 If We Hold on Together # 4 , 35 weeks, 465 190
    1992/03/29 That's Why I Call You My Friend # 58 , 4 weeks, 13 020
    1997/02/08 Promise Me You'll Try # 86 , 2 weeks, 6,350

    Music Labo [[top 20 only)

    1985/09/28 Eaten Alive LP # 20, 2 weeks

    RIAJ Awards

    If we hold on together - 1990-08 - Platinium
    The Force behind the power - 1992-02 Gold
    Last edited by Motown Love; 07-04-2024 at 07:26 PM.

  22. #22
    I think it would have been interesting if Diana engaged Stock Aitken Waterman to do one album after FBTP.

    Though I'm sure their music is not to everyone's taste but it might have given her a couple of top ten singles to follow on the success of the FBTP singles.

    I'm sure SAW would have jumped at the chance even though her voice wasn't quite as good as someone like Donna Summer who they had just worked with and that album rejuvenated her success.

    And the kids still liked SAW's songs - so it might have brought her a new generation of fans in the UK at least.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Levi Stubbs Tears View Post
    I think it would have been interesting if Diana engaged Stock Aitken Waterman to do one album after FBTP.

    Though I'm sure their music is not to everyone's taste but it might have given her a couple of top ten singles to follow on the success of the FBTP singles.

    I'm sure SAW would have jumped at the chance even though her voice wasn't quite as good as someone like Donna Summer who they had just worked with and that album rejuvenated her success.

    And the kids still liked SAW's songs - so it might have brought her a new generation of fans in the UK at least.
    Not a fan of SAW myself, but an interesting idea. Perhaps as her return to Motown album instead of “WO”.
    I think a Lionel Ritchie produced set to follow FBTP would have been in keeping with the soulful pop vibe that was proving a success for her.

  24. #24
    I looked up SAW and their prime hit making years were to mid to late 80s. Early 90s they were starting to slump and had also obtained a reputation for being very cheesy and assembly line with their productions. They still produced some hits but they had passed their peak in the UK. And they were never as big in the US as they were in the UK.

    If Diana Ross had gone to SAW after Force Behind the Power, at least it would have stuck to her MO from the 80s onward when picking producers to work with--namely working with them after they passed their commercial peak. At least Narada Michael Walden, who was also past his mid to late 80s peak, didn't have the same sort of cheesy reputation as SAW, when he produced tracks for Take Me Higher.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    Not a fan of SAW myself, but an interesting idea. Perhaps as her return to Motown album instead of “WO”.
    I think a Lionel Ritchie produced set to follow FBTP would have been in keeping with the soulful pop vibe that was proving a success for her.
    Babyface might have been one to go with in 1993/94/95, as he was much hotter than Ritchie, but he was so in demand he may not have had time to work with Ross as he had Whitney, Madonna, Toni Braxton, Eric Clapton, TLC, and others as well as himself to produce. I think there are a couple of songs on Take Me Higher that were produced by his production company but if so, then he must have farmed them out to producers who reported to him. If that's the case that just shows how much Diana Ross had slipped in the US to be relegated to b team of producers of a company that was on a hot streak.

  26. #26
    I believe the only thing that kept when you tell me you love off number 1 in the UK was the 're released Bohimian Rhapsody by Queen after the passing of Freddie Mercury

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Spreadinglove21 View Post
    Babyface might have been one to go with in 1993/94/95, as he was much hotter than Ritchie, but he was so in demand he may not have had time to work with Ross as he had Whitney, Madonna, Toni Braxton, Eric Clapton, TLC, and others as well as himself to produce. I think there are a couple of songs on Take Me Higher that were produced by his production company but if so, then he must have farmed them out to producers who reported to him. If that's the case that just shows how much Diana Ross had slipped in the US to be relegated to b team of producers of a company that was on a hot streak.
    You’re probably right about Babyface being a more sought after producer than Ritchie, with two of the albums cuts being produced by the Boom Brothers from the Babyface camp.
    I wouldn’t be surprised if BF had been approached to produce, with priority being given to more current, successful artists of the time.
    Despite Babyface popularity of the time, i still think Ritchie’s more traditional blend of soul/pop would have been the perfect fit for Diana.

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