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  1. #1
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    You're Gone But Always In My Heart

    This one's a favorite of mine from Sing HDH. The Supremes often sang tales of love lost, but rarely did they do anything so dreary and mournful. Maybe that's one of the reasons I like it, that it wasn't the usual fare. I love the track. I also love Diana's vocal and the addition of Lamont Dozier with the girls in the background. I think he added an even more sad factor.

    I think it would've been interesting if HDH had Diana recut her vocal for the album. Diana January 1964 was a different vocalist from Diana January 1967. Would've been interesting to see if her vocal approach differed at all. I wonder if that thought ever occurred to the fellas when they were putting the album together.

    Anyway, anyone else a fan of this departure in sound?


  2. #2
    It was bone chilling when I first heard it as a 15 year old. It was odd and astonishingly plodding, sounding like a funeral dirge. The rest of the album played but I could not get that dratted thing out of my head. I didn't hate it but it was hard to fit it into my idea of Motown. In the end, I kept going back to it a lot. Inside a couple days I found I liked this slice of Motown Gothic.

    For one thing, the snail's pace of the tune gives Diana plenty of room to practically luxuriate over words and phrasing, as if she were really exploring all the interpretive possibilities. That's something I love about Diana- when she was given the right song at a relaxed tempo, she could linger over syllables, making a pop single sound like jazz.

    The otherworldly- sounding backing by Mary, Flo and Lamont are absolutely necessary here. It's just the right compliment for the music and Diana. Contrast and compare the Gladys Knight & The Pips' version sung over the same track; theirs is good but to me, something is lost. Diana and the Sups nailed it. I only wish they would have added the strings we heard on the expanded edition version.

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    I always thought it an extremely odd inclusion and is probably my least favourite track from the HDH album. It might have sounded less out of place on “Where Did Our Love Go”........Perhaps.

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    I also thought of this as a heavy dirge - but featuring a brilliant, tender vocal full of pathos and despair. Now that the strings have been added, I love it without reservation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WaitingWatchingLookingForAChance View Post
    It was bone chilling when I first heard it as a 15 year old. It was odd and astonishingly plodding, sounding like a funeral dirge. The rest of the album played but I could not get that dratted thing out of my head. I didn't hate it but it was hard to fit it into my idea of Motown. In the end, I kept going back to it a lot. Inside a couple days I found I liked this slice of Motown Gothic.

    For one thing, the snail's pace of the tune gives Diana plenty of room to practically luxuriate over words and phrasing, as if she were really exploring all the interpretive possibilities. That's something I love about Diana- when she was given the right song at a relaxed tempo, she could linger over syllables, making a pop single sound like jazz.

    The otherworldly- sounding backing by Mary, Flo and Lamont are absolutely necessary here. It's just the right compliment for the music and Diana. Contrast and compare the Gladys Knight & The Pips' version sung over the same track; theirs is good but to me, something is lost. Diana and the Sups nailed it. I only wish they would have added the strings we heard on the expanded edition version.
    Yes, the added strings gave this song new life.

    I actually still believe "Gone" doesn't make sense on the HDH album. Neither does "Remove This Doubt" and "Love Is In Our Hearts". All three sound extremely dated by this point. [[I know Diana's lead for "Love Is In Our Hearts" was recorded in 66, but the track is from 64.) I personally feel their inclusions mess up the flow of the album. Add to that my disdain of the Supremes' "Heat Wave" and "Same Old Song", neither of which were cut with the quality of the originals, and the HDH album is even more lopsided IMO than the A Go Go. But of course, that isn't the point of this thread.

    Excellent commentary about Diana's singing on "Gone". I agree 100 percent. Gladys and the Pips' version is also good, but Gladys doesn't sound nearly as broken down as Diana. I suspect that the song's lyrics, like a lot of songs, are left up to the interpretation of the listener. One might listen to this and hear Diana singing of the guy that moved on. But the dirge feel of the song, IMO, makes it all the more clear that this guy is dead. And that makes Diana's lead even more moving for me. Again, we don't usually hear her this way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    Yes, the added strings gave this song new life.

    I actually still believe "Gone" doesn't make sense on the HDH album. Neither does "Remove This Doubt" and "Love Is In Our Hearts". All three sound extremely dated by this point. [[I know Diana's lead for "Love Is In Our Hearts" was recorded in 66, but the track is from 64.) I personally feel their inclusions mess up the flow of the album. Add to that my disdain of the Supremes' "Heat Wave" and "Same Old Song", neither of which were cut with the quality of the originals, and the HDH album is even more lopsided IMO than the A Go Go. But of course, that isn't the point of this thread.

    Excellent commentary about Diana's singing on "Gone". I agree 100 percent. Gladys and the Pips' version is also good, but Gladys doesn't sound nearly as broken down as Diana. I suspect that the song's lyrics, like a lot of songs, are left up to the interpretation of the listener. One might listen to this and hear Diana singing of the guy that moved on. But the dirge feel of the song, IMO, makes it all the more clear that this guy is dead. And that makes Diana's lead even more moving for me. Again, we don't usually hear her this way.
    "Gone" has grown on me, after many years. I always liked "Remove This Doubt", Ross's vocal and HDH's production. I think it belongs on Sing HDH. I like to play it right after " You Keep Me Hangin' On" and "Going Down For The Third Time", for the contrast and to spotlight the versatility of HDH.

    Gladys and the Pips' version is also good, but Gladys doesn't sound nearly as broken down as Diana. I suspect that the song's lyrics, like a lot of songs, are left up to the interpretation of the listener. One might listen to this and hear Diana singing of the guy that moved on. But the dirge feel of the song, IMO, makes it all the more clear that this guy is dead. And that makes Diana's lead even more moving for me. Again, we don't usually hear her this way.
    I'm now gonna listen to "Gone" in more than one way. I'd never thought about the guy being dead. I also love the added strings on the EE [[thanks, George!).

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    This Diana Ross song is nothing short of Breathtaking her voice is exquisite one of a kind is one of my favourite songs of hers and albums she takes beautiful music to a whole Nother level this is also one of Evan Ross favourite songs albums . Not too many can match the beauty in Diana Ross's voice

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    if we ever wanted to know how to mash up a funeral dirge with the motown beat, this would be it. I think can almost hear the orchestra playing this as Marie Antionette ascends the stairs to the guillotine

    needless to say, i do not like this song lolol

    and whoever thought this was an appropriate track to sequence after YKMHO on the lp is frankly just fucked in the head.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    if we ever wanted to know how to mash up a funeral dirge with the motown beat, this would be it. I think can almost hear the orchestra playing this as Marie Antionette ascends the stairs to the guillotine

    and whoever thought this was an appropriate track to sequence after YKMHO on the lp is frankly just fucked in the head.
    Wow! Yours is a particularly interesting response because the first part is a great take on the sound of the song while that last part juzt had me howling in unexpected laughter!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    I actually still believe "Gone" doesn't make sense on the HDH album. Neither does "Remove This Doubt" and "Love Is In Our Hearts". All three sound extremely dated by this point. [[I know Diana's lead for "Love Is In Our Hearts" was recorded in 66, but the track is from 64.) I personally feel their inclusions mess up the flow of the album.
    At first, I felt the same way. I like the older songs but they definitely sounded out of context with the radically streamlined almost ahead-of-its-time sounds of "You Keep Me Hanging On."


    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    ...my disdain of the Supremes' "Heat Wave" and "Same Old Song", neither of which were cut with the quality of the originals, and the HDH album is even more lopsided IMO than the A Go Go.
    Um what happened there? "It's The Same Old Song" sounded like a rush job in every sense. The production sounds like a cut-rate, budget LP track recorded in one quick take. The sax solo sounds as if it came from the afterlife, and the tempo is so rushed, Diana can hardly take a breath between words. If they just had to include this song, the first version recorded in '65 would at least have had more "personality".

    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    I suspect that the song's lyrics, like a lot of songs, are left up to the interpretation of the listener. One might listen to this and hear Diana singing of the guy that moved on. But the dirge feel of the song, IMO, makes it all the more clear that this guy is dead. And that makes Diana's lead even more moving for me. Again, we don't usually hear her this way.
    Don't quote me on this but I think I read somewhere that the song is along the lines of Your Heart Belongs To Me" in that it's a song about a man in the service. Can't recall if the subject passed away or if he was "gone" in the sense of being overseas. So there's yet another take on the song.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WaitingWatchingLookingForAChance View Post
    Wow! Yours is a particularly interesting response because the first part is a great take on the sound of the song while that last part juzt had me howling in unexpected laughter!
    lol well Waiting, i decided something more colorful than "i just don't like this song" was needed lol

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post

    and whoever thought this was an appropriate track to sequence after YKMHO on the lp is frankly just fucked in the head.
    That’s one way of putting it lol, but I absolutely agree. To call the contrast jarring would be an understatement. I honestly can’t think of a Supremes album I would have put this song on.

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    It's one of my favorite albums but I always thought A Go Go and Sing HDH could have been combined into one album without all the covers.
    You can hear the difference without the Funk Bros

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    what's ever more stupefying is that this was the B side to Come See About Me. I get it that they wanted to use an HDH song and there weren't any more on the WDOLG album.

    Remove this Doubt would have been a much better choice. or Love is in our heart.

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    Quote Originally Posted by daviddh View Post
    It's one of my favorite albums but I always thought A Go Go and Sing HDH could have been combined into one album without all the covers.
    You can hear the difference without the Funk Bros
    i do agree that A Go Go is a good but not great album. It benefits from having 11 of the 12 songs being very well known. so record buyers would have seen this long list of great song titles. Some of the covers are better than others IMO.

    HDH is more uneven. there are wonderful hits and filler. and some real questionable songs too. such as this one.

    I think you could still have the 2 albums but, as with many of the DRATS lps, I'd shuffle the songs differently between the two:

    A Go Go

    Itching
    This old heart
    YCHL
    Mother Dear [[version 3)
    in my lonely room
    just a little misunderstanding

    going down 3rd time
    shake me wake me
    get ready
    don't let true love die
    money
    there's no stopping

    HDH

    YKMHO
    Mikey's monkey
    love is here
    mother you smother you
    put yourself in my place
    i'll turn to stone

    love makes me do foolish things
    it's the same old song [[version 1)
    can i get a witness
    remove this doubt
    come and get these memories
    heatwave [[alt version)

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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    and whoever thought this was an appropriate track to sequence after YKMHO on the lp is frankly just fucked in the head.
    Agreed. Not only does the song sound out of place on a 1967 album, but following "Hangin"? Horrible idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WaitingWatchingLookingForAChance View Post
    Um what happened there? "It's The Same Old Song" sounded like a rush job in every sense. The production sounds like a cut-rate, budget LP track recorded in one quick take. The sax solo sounds as if it came from the afterlife, and the tempo is so rushed, Diana can hardly take a breath between words. If they just had to include this song, the first version recorded in '65 would at least have had more "personality".

    Don't quote me on this but I think I read somewhere that the song is along the lines of Your Heart Belongs To Me" in that it's a song about a man in the service. Can't recall if the subject passed away or if he was "gone" in the sense of being overseas. So there's yet another take on the song.
    I really would love to learn more from HDH about their vision for the Supremes when recording covers. How do you give the world the excitement of Martha and the Vandellas' "Heat Wave" and the Tops' "Same Old Song", and then take those same songs to the Supremes and give us what we got on Sing HDH? I'm not suggesting that the Supremes had to do exact covers of either of those songs. Diana Ross was not Martha or Levi. Likewise, they were not Diana Ross. So one wouldn't expect the producers to approach a cover of those songs the same way they did when Martha or Levi was at the mic. But come on! The Supremes' "Heat Wave" and "Old Song" song like some other label's copycat Motown production. Ugh.

    As for the lyrics of "Gone", thanks for yet another interpretation! I'm not sure that one works as well as the other two because of the lyric about removing the picture from the wall. Don't think too many women would've taken their soldier boy's photo off the wall...unless looking at it while he's gone just bothers her too much. So I guess it really is a relevant interpretation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    That’s one way of putting it lol, but I absolutely agree. To call the contrast jarring would be an understatement. I honestly can’t think of a Supremes album I would have put this song on.
    I think it would've worked on WDOLG and More Hits. But if the Ballads and Blues album had been released in the winter of 1964, I think "Gone" would've been perfect there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    what's ever more stupefying is that this was the B side to Come See About Me. I get it that they wanted to use an HDH song and there weren't any more on the WDOLG album.

    Remove this Doubt would have been a much better choice. or Love is in our heart.
    "Love Is In Our Hearts" didn't get a Supremes vocal until 1966, so they couldn't have used it.

    I wonder if using "Gone" on the flip of "Come See About Me" was keeping with the theme of the A side. On one side the girls are a bit hopeful, while on the flip there's resignation about the situation. I've never given any thought to why a song might be chosen as a B side. I wonder how random these decisions were or if there was often more thought put into it. I know a lot of times the decision was to place songs on both sides from the same team to get the most royalties, but what of the decision of which song itself? Of course whatever the answer, we'd still have to deal with "Time Changes Things" on the flip of "Forever Came Today". Such an odd pairing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    i do agree that A Go Go is a good but not great album. It benefits from having 11 of the 12 songs being very well known. so record buyers would have seen this long list of great song titles. Some of the covers are better than others IMO.

    HDH is more uneven. there are wonderful hits and filler. and some real questionable songs too. such as this one.

    I think you could still have the 2 albums but, as with many of the DRATS lps, I'd shuffle the songs differently between the two:

    A Go Go

    Itching
    This old heart
    YCHL
    Mother Dear [[version 3)
    in my lonely room
    just a little misunderstanding

    going down 3rd time
    shake me wake me
    get ready
    don't let true love die
    money
    there's no stopping

    HDH

    YKMHO
    Mikey's monkey
    love is here
    mother you smother you
    put yourself in my place
    i'll turn to stone

    love makes me do foolish things
    it's the same old song [[version 1)
    can i get a witness
    remove this doubt
    come and get these memories
    heatwave [[alt version)
    I think both of these track lists would've made far better albums than the originals. No question.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    I think both of these track lists would've made far better albums than the originals. No question.
    my version of A Go Go is probably the most dance, fast-paced record by the girls until the disco era. the tempo of these songs, especially my Side A, is quite fast, at least for the 60s. things slow ever so slightly on Side B, which is why I moved Shake Me there. And it could be argued that my playlist is just too much. the album wouldn't have had any rise and fall. just non-stop dance. and all fast. so that's a valid point

    As for Heatwave and Same Old Song, I tend to like the more alt versions that weren't released. completely agree that neither has the magic of the original. but at least they did something interesting with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    I think it would've worked on WDOLG and More Hits. But if the Ballads and Blues album had been released in the winter of 1964, I think "Gone" would've been perfect there.
    I adore More Hits. Why would you want to ruin an excellent album.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    "Love Is In Our Hearts" didn't get a Supremes vocal until 1966, so they couldn't have used it.

    I wonder if using "Gone" on the flip of "Come See About Me" was keeping with the theme of the A side. On one side the girls are a bit hopeful, while on the flip there's resignation about the situation. I've never given any thought to why a song might be chosen as a B side. I wonder how random these decisions were or if there was often more thought put into it. I know a lot of times the decision was to place songs on both sides from the same team to get the most royalties, but what of the decision of which song itself? Of course whatever the answer, we'd still have to deal with "Time Changes Things" on the flip of "Forever Came Today". Such an odd pairing.
    It would be interesting to know the process of B side selection. As you mention, the obvious answer being the royalties connection. If not, it did appear very haphazard at times. “Forever” And “Time Changes Things” really stands out as one of the oddest pairings in the groups career.
    For someone who was not familiar with there repertoire at the time, to flip it over for side B must have thought ‘WTF’.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post

    Gladys and the Pips' version is also good, but Gladys doesn't sound nearly as broken down as Diana.
    Thank you RanRan79 for bringing up Gladys and the Pips' version of which I was unaware. It was only until I listened to their version was I able, after 50+ years, to decipher what Diana was actually singing in the line around 1:34... "Nothing's changed for your __ __still remains in my heart." I had given up that it was a muffled way of singing 'memory.' And lo, and behold, Gladys sings 'image' which makes sense since a 'picture on the way' was referenced prior to that line. I can now check that off of the "Mysteries Which Have Baffled Me." Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    It would be interesting to know the process of B side selection. As you mention, the obvious answer being the royalties connection. If not, it did appear very haphazard at times. “Forever” And “Time Changes Things” really stands out as one of the oddest pairings in the groups career.
    For someone who was not familiar with there repertoire at the time, to flip it over for side B must have thought ‘WTF’.
    A while back, I think someone posted that MEET THE SUPREMES might have been re-issued around that time and Motown wanted to bring attention to it.

    I know there were a few other singles like the Marvelettes' THE HUNTER GETS CAPTURED BY THE GAME and Marvin Gaye's TOO BUSY THINKING ABOUT MY BABY that went back to early albums for their b-sides as well.

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    MTS was reissued in 65 with the new cover and with the stereo mix too

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    This song was intended to be on "More Hits"..it was supposed to be the first track on side one but they replaced it with "Ask Any Girl"...again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    As for Heatwave and Same Old Song, I tend to like the more alt versions that weren't released. completely agree that neither has the magic of the original. but at least they did something interesting with them.
    Yeah, the 1965 Supremes recordings of "Heatwave" and "Same Old" are leaps and bounds better than what appeared on HDH.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    I adore More Hits. Why would you want to ruin an excellent album.
    I actually don't adore More Hits. Too many of the songs leaned in a pop direction rather than an R&B direction for my personal tastes. "Gone" would've probably enhanced my listening experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jobucats View Post
    Thank you RanRan79 for bringing up Gladys and the Pips' version of which I was unaware. It was only until I listened to their version was I able, after 50+ years, to decipher what Diana was actually singing in the line around 1:34... "Nothing's changed for your __ __still remains in my heart." I had given up that it was a muffled way of singing 'memory.' And lo, and behold, Gladys sings 'image' which makes sense since a 'picture on the way' was referenced prior to that line. I can now check that off of the "Mysteries Which Have Baffled Me." Thanks
    Glad to be of service!

    Now maybe it's time someone made a thread about Supremes lyrics we don't understand or used to mess up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mowsville View Post
    This song was intended to be on "More Hits"..it was supposed to be the first track on side one but they replaced it with "Ask Any Girl"...again.
    As stated previously, I am not opposed to "Gone" being included on More Hits. But the idea that this song should've opened any album, especially one being marketed to the youth, is idiotic. Replacing it with "Ask Any Girl" is nearly as stupid, but at least the song still makes for an exciting opener.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    As stated previously, I am not opposed to "Gone" being included on More Hits. But the idea that this song should've opened any album, especially one being marketed to the youth, is idiotic. Replacing it with "Ask Any Girl" is nearly as stupid, but at least the song still makes for an exciting opener.
    “Ask Any Girl” being the hit that never was. The song had real potential and was perhaps still considered strong enough for single release during the time of “More Hits”.
    It’s certainly an infectious little ditty with an impassioned vocal from Diana.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    Yeah, the 1965 Supremes recordings of "Heatwave" and "Same Old" are leaps and bounds better than what appeared on HDH.
    To my ears both Version 1s of "Heatwave" and "Same Old Song" on A' Go-Go Expanded have the same vocals and phrasing as those same two songs on Sing HDH. I think Version 1 of each song is just too slow. My guess is that they decided they could speed them up and dump them on the poorly thought out HDH LP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    “Ask Any Girl” being the hit that never was. The song had real potential and was perhaps still considered strong enough for single release during the time of “More Hits”.
    It’s certainly an infectious little ditty with an impassioned vocal from Diana.
    Apparently that's the reasoning, that the song was being considered for single release and thus included on the album. But it makes no sense. By the time the album was released, both "Stop" and "Back" had been #1 hits. "Heartaches" was readied as the lead single, which was recorded in May, so we know the album was still being worked on as late as May 1965. After "Stop", "Back" and potentially "Heartaches", who would've thought "Ask Any Girl" would have made sense as a single? So I'm not buying this one. Somebody stuck that song [[great song as it is) on the album for no good reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnjeb View Post
    To my ears both Version 1s of "Heatwave" and "Same Old Song" on A' Go-Go Expanded have the same vocals and phrasing as those same two songs on Sing HDH. I think Version 1 of each song is just too slow. My guess is that they decided they could speed them up and dump them on the poorly thought out HDH LP.
    If I'm not mistaken, the first version of the Supremes' "Same Old Song" was the first version of the song period. The Supremes never cut vocals for it and HDH recut the track with the Tops for the classic we know today. What the EE gang did was take the vocals from the Sing HDH version and edit them onto the original track meant for the Supremes, so that's why the vocals are the same.

    As far as the vocals for "Heatwave", they're two different sets of vocals. The Supremes cut their vocals for the first one in 1965 and for the second one in 1966.

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    there was also some snags regarding You're Gone But Always In my Heart. I believe as the B side to CSAM, it was simply called Always In My Heart. but there was another song with that title and there might have been some copyright issues. so they pulled it from More Hits and just slapped Ask Any Girl on there since it was already prepared for an lp and was in both mono and stereo versions.

    of the HDH tracks on Where, they couldn't reuse one of the singles. and Ask Any Girl is the best album track. so maybe they just grabbed it and threw it onto the lp

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    If I'm not mistaken, the first version of the Supremes' "Same Old Song" was the first version of the song period. The Supremes never cut vocals for it and HDH recut the track with the Tops for the classic we know today. What the EE gang did was take the vocals from the Sing HDH version and edit them onto the original track meant for the Supremes, so that's why the vocals are the same.

    As far as the vocals for "Heatwave", they're two different sets of vocals. The Supremes cut their vocals for the first one in 1965 and for the second one in 1966.
    Thanks RanRan79. Some of what you say does sound familiar, the rest I must have forgotten or totally missed on reading the boolets of the EEs. One day I'll reread the booklets, which will be preferable to deliberately relistening to those two songs - either versions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post
    there was also some snags regarding You're Gone But Always In my Heart. I believe as the B side to CSAM, it was simply called Always In My Heart. but there was another song with that title and there might have been some copyright issues. so they pulled it from More Hits and just slapped Ask Any Girl on there since it was already prepared for an lp and was in both mono and stereo versions.
    The royalties HDH should've gotten for the song were erroneously directed toward some other song with the same name, which is why, apparently, the song is originally presented as "Always In My Heart" but shows up on Sing HDH as "You're Gone [[But Always In My Heart" to make the distinction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sup_fan View Post

    of the HDH tracks on Where, they couldn't reuse one of the singles. and Ask Any Girl is the best album track. so maybe they just grabbed it and threw it onto the lp
    Still makes no sense. Why did they need to reach back onto Where for an album track? "Ask Any Girl" could've easily been replaced by "It's All Your Fault", "Remove This Doubt", "Too Hurt To Cry", "Any Girl In Love", "He's All I Got". I swear Motown just didn't make sense sometimes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    The royalties HDH should've gotten for the song were erroneously directed toward some other song with the same name, which is why, apparently, the song is originally presented as "Always In My Heart" but shows up on Sing HDH as "You're Gone [[But Always In My Heart" to make the distinction.
    exactly. i don't think there was ever a lawsuit [[like how motown sued the writers of 1-2-3 since it copies Ask Any Girl). but there might have just been some rumbling and all and so motown decided to play it safe and pull the song. later it was renamed and that apparently soothed whatever concerns

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    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    The royalties HDH should've gotten for the song were erroneously directed toward some other song with the same name, which is why, apparently, the song is originally presented as "Always In My Heart" but shows up on Sing HDH as "You're Gone [[But Always In My Heart" to make the distinction.
    I looked this info up again. I remember doing it the last time this came up but I didn't recall the details.

    There was a 1942 movie "Always In My Heart". The song of the same name, an instrumental, from the film, was nominated for an Oscar in that year. It seems it became a standard [[aka "You Are Always In My Heart"). Jerry Vale had a version on his album from March 1965, Dean Martin did it in 1962.

    I always [[pun intended) thought that the title change had to do with the song placement on the album. "Hangin' On", [['get out of my life why don't you'); "You're Gone [[But Always In My Heart)"; "Love Is Here And Now You're Gone". I figured why else would they insert a dirge after YKMHO and before LIHANYG. I thought this because the title change put the emphasis on 'You're Gone' with parentheses around BAIMH, rather than [[You're Gone But) Always In My Heart.

    I like YGB[[AIMH) but not as much as I love "Remove This Doubt". Gone did not belong on HDH [[or MH). I bought a copy of the CSAM single in mid-1966 to have AIMH to complete my Supremes collection, to that point. Because of the title change I assumed the album track was a different song than the single. So I was doubly bummed: another song I already had [[in addition to the other Motown covers) and it's placement between two #1 hits, which killed the mood.

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    I love this song! I have to get out this set again because I must have not played it enough to realize what a great extended ending on this version. It’s definitely an over the top performance in all respects, and quite honestly I always thought it was the kind of song that would be great to strip to! In fact it’s still on my bucket list to do that one day!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    “Ask Any Girl” being the hit that never was. The song had real potential and was perhaps still considered strong enough for single release during the time of “More Hits”.
    It’s certainly an infectious little ditty with an impassioned vocal from Diana.
    What I've never understood was why Ask Any Girl ended up on their Greatest Hits album in '67? Not to mention Standing At The Crossroads, Everything Is Good About You and There's No Stopping Us Now. Yet Let Me Go The Right Way, You're Heart Belongs to Me and Breathtaking Guy were left off the album. All 20 of the songs on the collection were written/produced by HDH. Was this Motown's way of putting more cash in HDH's pockets in an attempt to quell their rebellion? It was one of their biggest, if not biggest selling albums. I wonder how much HDH made from that album alone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SatansBlues View Post
    What I've never understood was why Ask Any Girl ended up on their Greatest Hits album in '67? Not to mention Standing At The Crossroads, Everything Is Good About You and There's No Stopping Us Now. Yet Let Me Go The Right Way, You're Heart Belongs to Me and Breathtaking Guy were left off the album. All 20 of the songs on the collection were written/produced by HDH. Was this Motown's way of putting more cash in HDH's pockets in an attempt to quell their rebellion? It was one of their biggest, if not biggest selling albums. I wonder how much HDH made from that album alone.
    More than likely, they added those additional songs to pad out the album. Motown could have gotten away with releasing a single disc greatest hits collection on the group at that time. But because they decided to go double, they had to add more songs to end up at 20 because the girls hadn't had 20 hits yet. Plus they added in the autographed paintings. So it really became a special package.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    More than likely, they added those additional songs to pad out the album. Motown could have gotten away with releasing a single disc greatest hits collection on the group at that time. But because they decided to go double, they had to add more songs to end up at 20 because the girls hadn't had 20 hits yet. Plus they added in the autographed paintings. So it really became a special package.
    It could have been that they were regional hits and perhaps that's how they ended up on the double album.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    I always thought it an extremely odd inclusion and is probably my least favourite track from the HDH album. It might have sounded less out of place on “Where Did Our Love Go”........Perhaps.
    I agree! In fact, "You're Always In My Heart" originally came out as the B-side of "Come See About Me" in 1964 prior to it's inclusion on Supremes Sing HDH years later so it would've fit perfectly on Where Did Our Love Go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SatansBlues View Post
    What I've never understood was why Ask Any Girl ended up on their Greatest Hits album in '67? Not to mention Standing At The Crossroads, Everything Is Good About You and There's No Stopping Us Now. Yet Let Me Go The Right Way, You're Heart Belongs to Me and Breathtaking Guy were left off the album. All 20 of the songs on the collection were written/produced by HDH. Was this Motown's way of putting more cash in HDH's pockets in an attempt to quell their rebellion? It was one of their biggest, if not biggest selling albums. I wonder how much HDH made from that album alone.
    your final comment is most likely why. HDH produced the GH album. and so they obviously wanted to only include their songs so no royalties would be shared. i mean who wouldn't have expected a double album GH set of the Supremes to sell gangbusters in summer of 67?

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