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  1. #1

    Tina turner docutmentary on hbo sat 3/27

    Tina Turner documentary tells such a harrowing, awful story that it becomes inspiring
    Mick LaSalle

    “Tina” doesn’t just tell you all about Tina Turner. It makes you feel like you know her, personally, and it gives you some sense of what it was like to live her life. To say that she had it rough is not enough. For decades, it was a loveless nightmare.

    The new HBO documentary, which airs on HBO and HBO Max at 8 p.m. Saturday, March 27 [[on demand Sunday, March 28), hits the familiar points of Turner’s story — discovery by musician Ike Turner, the domestic abuse, the years in the wilderness followed by the massive comeback — but it does so in illuminating detail. Along the way, there’s Turner herself, telling her story in both archival and recent interviews. Considering everything she’s been through, she’s remarkably even-keeled.

    Hers is a sobering story, but inspiring, too. What makes it inspiring is Turner’s unassailable ability to survive. When she was growing up in Tennessee, Turner’s mother left the family. Then her father left, so she had to grow up quickly. Somehow, she had acquired ambition. Turner recalls seeing a magazine photo of Paris’ Champs-Elysees and thinking, “The world. That’s where I want to go.”

    Her ticket to the bigger world came when she was still a teenager. She auditioned for Ike Turner and joined his band, and everything was fine, until they married and he started beating her. He’d beat her with a coat hanger or a shoe stretcher, and then he’d have sex with her. Just sick. She was terrified of him, and this went on for years.

    At a time when Turner was an influential and successful singer — an inspiration to younger talents such as Mick Jagger and Janis Joplin — she was living the life of a prisoner. “I lived a shameful lie,” she says, with characteristic insight. “And I found a way to live with it by being ashamed.”

    Look in her eyes circa 1968, even when she’s smiling. Then look at her closely, in the first flush of solo success in the mid-1980s. Her spirit goes from heavy to buoyant, from fearful to realized.

    As the documentary makes clear, two escape attempts define Turner’s life. The first was her successful escape from her marriage. The second was her unsuccessful attempt to escape the story of her marriage — or as she puts it, “the ridiculously embarrassing story of my life.”

    In 1981, she told People magazine about Ike’s abuse, hoping to put it behind her. But three years later, following the success of her album, “Private Dancer,” all the press wanted to ask her about was Ike. Imagine getting a question like this on national television: “When you were married to Ike, what was the absolute worst moment?”

    The irony, which Turner seems to ruefully understand, is that the Ike story has become part of her legend. It’s part of what people like and admire about her, and it almost certainly added to the universal excitement that attended her great successes in the 1980s. After all, the audiences that filled entire stadiums weren’t there just to see a performer. They were there to see a person and share in her triumph, as if they themselves had a stake in it.

    In the end, what might be most admirable about Tina Turner is that she has never basked in the commodification of her victimhood. The documentary shows her at a news conference for “What’s Love Got to Do with It” [[1993), saying that she hadn’t yet seen the movie about her life. She said she didn’t want to go through all that again.

    But we want to go see Tina Turner’s life again, at least when the documentary is as good as this one.



    “Tina”: Documentary. Starring Tina Turner. Directed by Daniel Lindsay and T.J. Martin. [[Not rated. 118 minutes.) Airs on HBO and HBO Max 8 p.m. Saturday, March 27. On demand starting Sunday, March 28.

    https://datebook.sfchronicle.com/mov...omes-inspiring






  2. #2
    That's a great review, and quite similar to the NY Times review today. As a long-time fan of Tina I'm so happy to see that these reviews give insight into the new doc and inspire viewers to see a story we may think we already know.

  3. #3
    This is a Great Documentary, it's very fair and honest . A good record of an amazing life, Tina !!

  4. #4
    It was terrific. I watched it last night. You are right about it being fair and honest. And also, as this article says, it was also
    HER WAY OF SAYING THANK YOU — AND GOODBYE — TO ALL OF US

    https://researchblaze.com/2021/03/27...-to-all-of-us/

    She, along with two other female icons, Dionne and Chaka are up for nominations in the R&R Hall of Fame. While all of them deserve it, and should have already been there, I am hoping the Tina makes it this time

  5. #5
    I agree it was excellent. I noticed in the credits that her husband was co-producer. Having said that she was very frank about the abuse and sadness in and around her life.

  6. #6
    Very captivating documentary. Substantial inclusion of her performances. Ya gotta love Tina Turner. The review above says it all. Very well written.

    I will add my two cents -- her hair is part of her "look." She should never cut it short.
    It moves with her.

  7. #7
    Very well made documentary. Loved all of the archival footage that was featured throughout and her interviews. My only complaint is that this documentary is more geared toward the general public, giving an overview of her life through the lens of how the public has always perceived her, which is being a survivor. So of course, they delve into her abusive and tumultuous marriage to Ike. They spent a bit more time on this than I would have liked, but I acknowledge that it is an important part of her story to tell. I just wish that there could have been a bit more time devoted to discussing her career, especially the second half of her career. In regards to that era, the documentary mostly focused on the story behind her first international hit song, "What's Love Got To Do With It", and then encapsulated her trajectory to major stardom, all due to this song, within a matter of minutes. Then they went on to discuss how she was filling stadiums, wrote her book, which was then turned into the movie and the musical. The fan in me wanted to hear a bit more about her subsequent albums that I've always loved, such as Break Every Rule, Foreign Affair, Wildest Dreams, Twenty Four Seven etc. I suppose that they are considered to be minor footnotes in her life story. I did feel for her, watching this doc. Her history with Ike made her into a heroic survivor and an inspirational figure, but it also kept her tied down to that story and that traumatic history that she ultimately just wanted to forget. She's so much more than all of that.
    Last edited by carlo; 03-28-2021 at 07:57 PM.

  8. #8
    I watched on Demand last night. Ike & Tina are in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame but now she should be in as a solo. The saddest part of her life to me, is that she feels her mother did not love her.

  9. #9
    As a big Tina fan, I've already watched this doc twice. I think it was really well done and I loved the footage from the Ike and Tina days. There also seemed to be silent color home videos shot on the sets of WHERE THE ACTION IS!, HOLLYWOOD A GO GO, and READY STEADY GO, probably courtesy of Rhonda Graam [[R.I.P.)

    I didn't learn anything that I didn't already know. But I was surprised that there was no mention of Tina's role in TOMMY. Perhaps they couldn't get the rights to "Acid Queen." But that project, along with RIVER DEEP..., were steps to building Tina's confidence as a solo artist so again, I was surprised that there was no mention of it.

  10. #10
    I really liked the documentary. However, I agree with Carlo and Reese that the omission of her 20+ year post-"Private Dancer" recording career is curious. Tina is a fantastic singer and an electrifying performer. One of my favorites and I love her recordings. I would have loved more information on her creative process as a solo recording artist.

    But this is for the masses and Tina is only one thing to the masses...a survivor. So it required gruesome exposition of the saddest and darkest period of her life.

    Quote Originally Posted by milven View Post
    In the end, what might be most admirable about Tina Turner is that she has never basked in the commodification of her victimhood. The documentary shows her at a news conference for “What’s Love Got to Do with It” [[1993), saying that she hadn’t yet seen the movie about her life. She said she didn’t want to go through all that again.
    This comment from the review is interesting. I don't fully agree that Tina avoided "commodification" of 'victimhood.' What struck me about the documentary was the overarching narrative that prior to her 'comeback' [[and throughout her career) Tina was COMPELLED by others to talk about Ike and relive her past.

    Ike & Tina were well-known but they only had one big hit. They were truly "cult" artists renowned for their performances. Tina is an exceptional talent but she could have disappeared into the ether alongside other exceptional Black female singers who came along in the 60s.

    Ultimately, she made a choice to reveal the horrific details of her life as a long-suffering victim of abuse at the hands of Ike Turner. That is the underpinning of her entire career as a solo artist -- overcoming trauma and adversity to finally step into the light as a survivor and superstar.

    Books, a movie, a Broadway musical, and now, a documentary have all told this same narrow Tina Turner story. Certainly, when Oprah entered her commercial orbit during promotion of Tina's "Wildest Dreams" album -- which yielded no major hits in the U.S. -- it was no longer about Tina as a recording artist. She became a canonized, Oprah-endorsed monument of triumph over trauma and adversity. This increased her drawing power and sustained her for 3 more successful world tours.

    It is her life and her story. It is her right to tell it and use it as she pleases. The part of her narrative that inspires is that she triumphed over trauma and abuse. She understands that and has leveraged, to her economic advantage, whatever hurt, trauma and inconvenience was occasioned by having to spend 5 decades talking about the details of her life with Ike.

  11. #11
    one hit ? Ike & Tina had several hits in the early 60's on Sue Records that were POP hits on the Hot 100, "Fool In Love" 2 R & B, # 21 POP, "I Idolize You" #5 R & B,#82 Pop, "Its Gonna Work Out Fine"#2 R & B # 14 POP, "Poor Fool" # 4 R & B # 38 Pop, "Tra La La La" # 9 R & B # 50 POP.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Guy View Post
    I really liked the documentary. However, I agree with Carlo and Reese that the omission of her 20+ year post-"Private Dancer" recording career is curious. Tina is a fantastic singer and an electrifying performer. One of my favorites and I love her recordings. I would have loved more information on her creative process as a solo recording artist.

    But this is for the masses and Tina is only one thing to the masses...a survivor. So it required gruesome exposition of the saddest and darkest period of her life.



    This comment from the review is interesting. I don't fully agree that Tina avoided "commodification" of 'victimhood.' What struck me about the documentary was the overarching narrative that prior to her 'comeback' [[and throughout her career) Tina was COMPELLED by others to talk about Ike and relive her past.

    Ike & Tina were well-known but they only had one big hit. They were truly "cult" artists renowned for their performances. Tina is an exceptional talent but she could have disappeared into the ether alongside other exceptional Black female singers who came along in the 60s.

    Ultimately, she made a choice to reveal the horrific details of her life as a long-suffering victim of abuse at the hands of Ike Turner. That is the underpinning of her entire career as a solo artist -- overcoming trauma and adversity to finally step into the light as a survivor and superstar.

    Books, a movie, a Broadway musical, and now, a documentary have all told this same narrow Tina Turner story. Certainly, when Oprah entered her commercial orbit during promotion of Tina's "Wildest Dreams" album -- which yielded no major hits in the U.S. -- it was no longer about Tina as a recording artist. She became a canonized, Oprah-endorsed monument of triumph over trauma and adversity. This increased her drawing power and sustained her for 3 more successful world tours.

    It is her life and her story. It is her right to tell it and use it as she pleases. The part of her narrative that inspires is that she triumphed over trauma and abuse. She understands that and has leveraged, to her economic advantage, whatever hurt, trauma and inconvenience was occasioned by having to spend 5 decades talking about the details of her life with Ike.
    Interestingly stated. I have been a true Tina fan since the review days, and seeing Ike & Tina on tv, on both Ed Sullivan and Hugh Hefner's variety shows, both in [[I think) '69. I had a string of I&TT lps well before the Proud Mary era. I found Oprah's glomming on to Tina to be a tad ... Oprah-ish, and it was pretty funny to hear her rattle on about being such a superfan while really, obviously knowing nothing about the earlier years. I've gone back and forth with my opinion about Tina's fairly constant re-telling of the Ike years, but, as you state, it is the lady's life and her legacy to frame however she wants. Based on the trailers I do look forward to seeing the doc, though it's certainly bittersweet for me to realize that as far as public life goes for Tina this really will be 'the end'.

  13. #13
    the take away for me is she is till traumatized [[PTSD) from her years with Ike. And the fact that interviewers still wanted to know about Ike, 16 years later. So I agree with Carlo, she had many great albums as a solo artist that weren't mentioned, but she was able to shape the narrative and I appreciate that.
    In a similar vein, I'm enjoying Genius, Aretha, because there is more being shared about her life than has previously been shared. In this instance someone else needed to tell the story.

  14. #14

  15. #15
    I believe Proud Mary was a bigger hit worldwide than RDMH.

  16. #16
    I’m in the midst of watching now. What a scary yet thrilling ride. I’m loving the archival footage, photos and interviews. Brava.

  17. #17
    Only just catching up with it tonight. A great doco.

    It shows what having a great manager can do for an artist in the doldrums [[as Tina was in the early 80s).

    Those audio interview clips - from when she was being brutally honest with interviewers are chilling though.

    The Aussie influence was strong. Manager Roger Davies. Songwriter Terry Britten. Even her version of 'Help' was a direct copy of Aussie John Farnham's version of the song from 1980 [[which I remember Janis Ian said back then that it was one of the greatest ever re-imaginings of a song). Plus of course Mad Max III.

  18. #18
    It broke my heart to read last week that on reflection she thinks her life was more heartbreak and sadness than good..she brought happiness to countless millions and feels like this about her journey..poor woman she's a a tower and beacon of overcoming adversity to so many and yet at this last stage of her life she hasn't found peace..I suffer from ptsd myself..it's a dark, unrelenting illness

  19. #19
    Saw her live here in Holland several times, the last time when she was the first artist to perform in the Amsterdam Arena. John Miles [[who had a big hitsong called Music) was in her band also.
    Apparently the house she lives in in Zurich is a rental.

  20. #20
    I just watched it last night. I loved it. Anytime [[in the doco) Ike's pic came up & I thought: Dayum, that man really looks dangerous!! She really went through some bad days!

    But, what I really admire her for is how she reinvented herself: the dresses, the spikey hair {wigs, perhaps? Didn't she had a bad incident that fried all of her hair off?) Who could compete with her with those legs? God Almighty!!!!

    Does anyone remember back in Live Aid in 1985 how Mick Jagger grabbed & removed her skirt while they were onstage??

    This was the way she wanted to go off & retire. On her terms & putting everything to rest. Even though her Zurich house is a rental I would gladly take it in a heartbeat, LOL

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by moe View Post
    I just watched it last night. I loved it. Anytime [[in the doco) Ike's pic came up & I thought: Dayum, that man really looks dangerous!! She really went through some bad days!

    But, what I really admire her for is how she reinvented herself: the dresses, the spikey hair {wigs, perhaps? Didn't she had a bad incident that fried all of her hair off?) Who could compete with her with those legs? God Almighty!!!!

    Does anyone remember back in Live Aid in 1985 how Mick Jagger grabbed & removed her skirt while they were onstage??

    This was the way she wanted to go off & retire. On her terms & putting everything to rest. Even though her Zurich house is a rental I would gladly take it in a heartbeat, LOL
    Glad to hear another positive review of this doc, which I look forward to seeing. Tina had a 'bad hair' experience in the early Revue days and started wearing wigs at that time. There have been rare pictures of her looking gorgeous with a short, natural cut. I do remember the Live Aid performance and was not happy with Jagger's white-boy subjugation. For me it ruined an otherwise fun performance. My guess [[without having seen the doc) is that Tina continues to deal with the facts of the abusive part of her life and taking about it is her way of handling it, both in terms of self-acceptance as well as a cautionary tale.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceNHarmony View Post
    Glad to hear another positive review of this doc, which I look forward to seeing. Tina had a 'bad hair' experience in the early Revue days and started wearing wigs at that time. There have been rare pictures of her looking gorgeous with a short, natural cut. I do remember the Live Aid performance and was not happy with Jagger's white-boy subjugation. For me it ruined an otherwise fun performance. My guess [[without having seen the doc) is that Tina continues to deal with the facts of the abusive part of her life and taking about it is her way of handling it, both in terms of self-acceptance as well as a cautionary tale.
    Thank you, PeaceNHarmony for your input. I thought at first my mind was out in left field [[Tina's hair & Live Aid with Jagger) but I'm happy someone else remembers!!
    The other fact I found interesting in the doco is that Phil Spector had to pay Ike to
    go away & let Tina solely record RDMH [[which is a fave of mine).
    You will enjoy it!!

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by moe View Post
    Thank you, PeaceNHarmony for your input. I thought at first my mind was out in left field [[Tina's hair & Live Aid with Jagger) but I'm happy someone else remembers!!
    The other fact I found interesting in the doco is that Phil Spector had to pay Ike to
    go away & let Tina solely record RDMH [[which is a fave of mine).
    You will enjoy it!!
    Tina mainly relied on hair weaves post her comeback.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by sansradio View Post
    Tina mainly relied on hair weaves post her comeback.
    Actually according to her former friend and assistant, Eddy Armani, after her solo career started, Tina was really into weaves for a good while. She would tell everyone that she had a gig out of town over the weekend so no one would visit. But she would really be at home having her old weave removed and replaced by Eddy and one of her backing singers/dancers, Lejeune Richardson.

    After she became popular with PRIVATE DANCER, her schedule became so hectic that she didn't have two days to spare and that's when she went back to wigs that Eddy claims to have made.

    When she appeared on 60 MINUTES, Tina didn't mention Eddy but did say that she did the wigs and the hair was imported from Africa [[I think).

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    Actually according to her former friend and assistant, Eddy Armani, after her solo career started, Tina was really into weaves for a good while. She would tell everyone that she had a gig out of town over the weekend so no one would visit. But she would really be at home having her old weave removed and replaced by Eddy and one of her backing singers/dancers, Lejeune Richardson.

    After she became popular with PRIVATE DANCER, her schedule became so hectic that she didn't have two days to spare and that's when she went back to wigs that Eddy claims to have made.

    When she appeared on 60 MINUTES, Tina didn't mention Eddy but did say that she did the wigs and the hair was imported from Africa [[I think).
    Yes, Eddy's book was a humdinger!

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by sansradio View Post
    Yes, Eddy's book was a humdinger!
    I loved his book -- "The Real T" -- and I believe almost every word of it. I think it flatters Tina by highlighting her humanity and ambition.

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    Actually according to her former friend and assistant, Eddy Armani, after her solo career started, Tina was really into weaves for a good while. She would tell everyone that she had a gig out of town over the weekend so no one would visit. But she would really be at home having her old weave removed and replaced by Eddy and one of her backing singers/dancers, Lejeune Richardson.

    After she became popular with PRIVATE DANCER, her schedule became so hectic that she didn't have two days to spare and that's when she went back to wigs that Eddy claims to have made.

    When she appeared on 60 MINUTES, Tina didn't mention Eddy but did say that she did the wigs and the hair was imported from Africa [[I think).
    Shout OUT to Lejeune, as well as Ann Beringer, two long-term 'Tina-ettes'. I hope both ladies are well.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceNHarmony View Post
    Shout OUT to Lejeune, as well as Ann Beringer, two long-term 'Tina-ettes'. I hope both ladies are well.
    Both are interviewed in the new doc.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    Both are interviewed in the new doc.
    That will be great to see, Reese. Both ladies were with Tina for quite a long time. Ann, a fellow blonde, could have spared me at least an inch or two of that hair!!

  30. #30
    For the last tour in 2000, the Twenty Four Seven Tour, one of the backup singers was Gloria Reuben who was one of the main actors in the first 6 seasons of the tv series ER.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_Reuben

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by jack020 View Post
    For the last tour in 2000, the Twenty Four Seven Tour, one of the backup singers was Gloria Reuben who was one of the main actors in the first 6 seasons of the tv series ER.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_Reuben
    Yes, and Tina made note of that during the introduction section of each of the 24/7 shows.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by jack020 View Post
    For the last tour in 2000, the Twenty Four Seven Tour, one of the backup singers was Gloria Reuben who was one of the main actors in the first 6 seasons of the tv series ER.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria_Reuben
    Gloria got quite a bit of press when she joined Tina. In addition to the tour, I remember her appearing with Tina on Oprah as well as the Super Bowl Pre-Game Show. That was a really good tour.

    Tina's last tour in 2008 was a good one as well, although I remember thinking it wasn't quite the Tina I knew. But at almost 70, that was to be expected.
    Last edited by reese; Yesterday at 09:20 AM.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    Gloria got quite a bit of press when she joined Tina. In addition to the tour, I remember her appearing with Tina on Oprah as well as the Super Bowl Pre-Game Show. That was a really good tour.

    Tina's last tour in 2008 was a good one as well, although I remember thinking it wasn't quite the Tina I knew. But at almost 70, that was to be expected.
    Tina did great, all things considered, on the '08 final tour, and the audiences were rapturous, but it was indeed a necessarily lower-energy show. Tina sounded great and, noticeable to vintage fans, conserved energy by sometimes implying dance moves. I thought the costumes were not great and not flattering, and some of the 'show pieces' [[the hulk on stage during "We Don't Need Another Hero" comes to mind) were unfortunate and campy. All really petty claims but I do agree with you that the show could have been better.

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