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Thread: Google doodles

  1. #4201
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    27 December 2017
    Mirza Ghalib’s 220th Birthday







    Today we celebrate one of Urdu literature’s most iconic poets, Mirza Asadullah Baig Khan, known in popular culture by many names, but most commonly as Ghalib [meaning conqueror].


    Born in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, during the reign of Mughal Emperor Bahadur Shah, Ghalib showed a gift for language at an early age and was educated in Persian, Urdu, and Arabic.


    His verse is characterized by a lingering sadness borne of a tumultuous and often tragic life — from being orphaned at an early age, to losing all of his seven children in their infancy, to the political upheaval that surrounded the fall of Mughal rule in India. He struggled financially, never holding a regular paying job but instead depending on patronage from royalty and more affluent friends.


    But despite these hardships, Ghalib navigated his circumstances with wit, intellect, and an all-encompassing love for life. His contributions to Urdu poetry and prose were not fully appreciated in his lifetime, but his legacy has come to be widely celebrated, most particularly for his mastery of the Urdu ghazal [amatory poem].


    Irshad muqarar, Mirza!

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    23 October 2020
    Gianni Rodari’s 100th Birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates the centennial birthday of Italian writer and journalist Gianni Rodari, widely acclaimed as one of the most influential Italian children’s authors of the 20th century. Rodari earned renown for accessible stories of fantasy that incorporated real-world social issues, including “Il romanzo di Cipollino” [“The Tale of The Little Onion,” 1951], which is represented in today’s Doodle. In 1970, he became the first–and to this date only–Italian to win the Hans Christian Andersen Award for writing, one of the highest international honors in children’s literature.

    Gianni Rodari was born on this day in 1920 in the northern Italian town of Omegna. Interested early on in children’s education, he first taught at an elementary school before he transitioned to work as a newspaper reporter. Based on his previous experience, his editors asked him to write for the paper’s children’s section, beginning his iconic career in children’s literature. By 1960 he had written enough material to publish his first book, "Nursery Rhymes in the Sky and on Earth.“

    Two years later he released his hit story collection “Telephone Tales,” considered by some to be his masterpiece. Rodari went on to craft a variety of beloved literature over the following decades, earning his place as a household name in Italy. He simultaneously contributed heavily to the country’s educational reform movement.

    For his contributions to children’s literature, Rodari won many major awards throughout his life, and today his works have been translated into over 20 languages.

    Happy birthday, Gianni Rodari, and thank you for bringing your imagination to life for generations to enjoy.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 06:30 AM.

  3. #4203
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    15 August 2019
    Ignacio Anaya García’s 124th Birthday









    On this day in 1895, Mexican culinary innovator Ignacio Anaya García was born, whose proper name is not as familiar as his nickname: “Nacho,” a common abbreviation for Ignacio. As shown in today’s Doodle, illustrated by Mexico City-based guest artist Alfonso de Anda, this particular Nacho revolutionized world cuisine by melting grated Wisconsin cheese over some jalapeno slices and totopos [[tortilla chips), thus inventing the dish he dubbed Nachos especiales.

    The year was 1943, and García was working as Maître d' at Club Victoria, a popular restaurant in the border town of Piedras Negras, Coahuila. A group of American women, wives of soldiers stationed at nearby Eagle Pass Army Airbase, stopped in asking for a snack. Unable to find a chef, García took matters into his own hands, improvising the tasty treat much to his customers’ delight.

    Word soon spread about the Nachos especiales, which were added to the Club Victoria menu, imitated around town, and written up in an American cookbook as early as 1949. By 1960, García had opened his own restaurant, El Nacho.

    In the 76 years since their invention, nachos have spread all over the world. A mass-produced version was introduced in 1976 at Arlington Stadium in Texas, with liquefied cheese sauce pumped out of large cans. Stadiums were quickly selling more nachos than popcorn.

    Although García refused to patent his creation—“It's just a snack to keep my customers happy and well-fed,” he reportedly said, “It's like any other border dish”—his name has gone down in history. Each October, Piedras Negras hosts the International Nacho Festival, and the town has erected a plaque in his honor, a fitting memorial to one man’s delicious legacy.

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    15 August 2017
    South Korea National Day 2017







    National Liberation Day, also called Gwangbokjeol [“the day the light returned”], marks South Korea’s independence following the end of WWII. Today, South Koreans embrace their hard-earned nationhood with patriotic fanfare, participating in parades and community festivals. In South Korea’s capital of Seoul, dignitaries and prominent political figures gather at the Sejong Center for the Performing Arts for the annual ringing of the bell at 12 PM on the dot to commemorate former leaders.

    Today’s Doodle welcomes National Liberation Day with an intricate rendering of a mugunghwa [botanical name: Hibiscus syriacus], Korea’s national flower. Beloved by Koreans for over a thousand years, this bloom symbolizes perseverance and loyalty — the perfect complement to the country’s flag, known as taegukgi, which is emblazoned with a bold blue and red circle representing the harmony of yin-yang.

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    15 Aug 2017
    India's Independence Day 2017






    On August 15th, 1947, the front page of The Times of India jubilantly proclaimed “Nation Wakes to New Life!” Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of the Dominion of India, raised the national flag above the Red Fort’s Lahori Gate as a declaration of the country’s newly won independence.

    The 90-year independence movement was a campaign marked by both peaceful endurance and unwavering patriotism, shaping a strong sense of national identity for the people of India that lives on today.

    To honor the anniversary, Mumbai-based artist Sabeena Karnik used a unique paper-cut art style to create a Doodle fit for the bold and colorful celebration of today’s events. The Parliament House depicted in her work commemorates this day, this movement, and this triumph of independence.
    Happy Independence Day to the Republic of India!

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    9 November 2020
    Sir Giles Gilbert Scott's 140th birthday





    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by UK-based guest artist Jing Zhang, celebrates British architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who is widely regarded as one of the country’s most significant architects of the 20th century. Renowned for designs such as the Battersea Power Station and the now-iconic red telephone box illustrated in today’s Doodle, Scott combined traditional and modern styles to craft some of London’s most familiar landmarks.

    Giles Gilbert Scott was born into a lineage of significant architects on this day in 1880 in London, England. When he was young, his mother encouraged him to carry forward the family legacy, and took him and his brother on bicycle trips to view church architecture throughout the English countryside. He went on to apprentice as an architect, and at just 21 he won a contest that landed him the largest commission of his life: the Liverpool Cathedral–one of many churches he designed throughout his career.

    Yet Scott’s most famous creation may be his smallest–the red telephone box he designed in 1924 and simplified in 1935. The updated version was so popular that 60,000 units were installed across the United Kingdom. Today, many of the beloved booths have been reoutfitted to serve new purposes, from defibrillator stations to miniature libraries.

    For his exceptional achievements in the field of architecture, Scott was knighted in 1924, and in 1944 he was awarded one of Britain’s highest honors—the Order of Merit.

    Happy birthday, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott!
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 06:42 AM.

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    9 November 2012
    Paul Abadie's 200th Birthday






    Paul Abadie [9 November 1812 – 3 August 1884] was a French architect and building restorer. He is considered a central representative of French historicism. He was the son of architect Paul Abadie Sr..

    Abadie worked on the restoration of Notre-Dame de Paris, Église Sainte-Croix of Bordeaux, Saint-Pierre of Angoulême and Saint-Front of Périgueux. He won the competition in 1873 to design the Basilica of the Sacré Cœur on Montmartre in Paris, and saw construction commence on it, though he died long before its completion in 1914.

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    9 November 2018
    Celebrating Amanda Crowe







    In honor of Native American Heritage Month, today’s video Doodle celebrates Eastern Band Cherokee Indian woodcarver and educator Amanda Crowe, a prolific artist renowned for her expressive animal figures. Led by Doodler Lydia Nichols, the Doodle was created in collaboration with the
    Qualla Arts & Crafts Mutual as well as William “Bill” H. Crowe, Jr., woodcarver and nephew and former student of Amanda Crowe. Aside from highlighting Crowe’s own words and passion for her craft, the Doodle features high resolution imagery of Amanda’s true works housed in her homeland at Qualla Arts & Crafts Mutual, the nation’s oldest American Indian cooperative. The music is also an original composition by her nephew, Bill.

    Born in 1928, Crowe was raised within the Qualla Boundary in North Carolina, which is territory owned by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Her artistic talent emerged early, as she began drawing and carving around the age of four. Although Crowe said she was “barely old enough to handle a knife,” she was determined to express herself. Studying with her uncle Goingback Chiltoskey, a well-known woodcarver in his own right, Crowe honed her skills, carrying her tools to school to pursue her passion for creativity and even selling her carvings as a child.

    In 1946, Crowe earned a scholarship to study at the Art Institute of Chicago, expanding her vision through exposure to the world-renowned museum’s permanent collection of sculpture. She learned to work with plaster, stone, and metal, but always came back to wood as her preferred medium. “The grain challenges me to create objects in three dimensions,” she explained. “A mistake or flaw in the wood will improve your design. To me, a knot can be the best part.”

    After earning her Master of Fine Arts degree, Crowe studied in Mexico with the renowned sculptor José de Creeft before returning to her homeland in the Qualla Boundary. There, she established a studio in the Paint Town community and began teaching art classes at Cherokee High School, where she would teach over 2000 students over the course of 40 years.

    As many prominent American Indian artists studied under Crowe, her tutelage has been credited with fostering a resurgence of Cherokee carving. Crowe’s work can has been showcased in the High Museum in Atlanta and the Mint Museum in Charlotte in addition to private collections all over the world.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 06:53 AM.

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    9 November 2019
    Celebrating the Edmonton Grads







    The Edmonton Commercial Graduates Basketball Club, better known as “The Grads,” started as a high school girls basketball team and became a sports dynasty. Today’s Doodle celebrates The Grads’ induction into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame on this day in 2017. It was a fitting honor for a team that holds arguably one of the best winning percentages in North America—approximately 95 percent over 25 years—in any sport.. With outstanding sportsmanship and determination, The Grads also defeated stereotypes that had discouraged women from participating in competitive sports.

    Teacher Percy Page started the team in 1914 as a physical education program for the 60 girls at McDougall Commercial High School in the Canadian city of Edmonton. In their first season, they won the provincial championship, and when some of the graduating seniors indicated that they’d like to continue playing, Page was inspired to set up The Grads after they graduated in 1915.

    During the next quarter century, The Grads went on to win 23 of 24 Provincial Championships and racked up stats that would be the envy of any team, including earning winning streaks of 147 and 78 games, separated by just a single loss. They went undefeated in the Western Canadian Championships from 1926 to 1940 and won 29 of 31 games in the Canadian Championships, never losing a series. After the Grads won the Underwood International tournament, also known as the “North American championship,” for 17 years straight, tournament organizers decided to let them keep the trophy permanently.

    The Grads additionally won seven of nine games against men's teams and went unbeaten in 27 exhibition games at four Olympic Games—though they never won a medal since women’s basketball was not yet an Olympic sport.

    When The Grads first started, basketball was a fairly new sport, having been invented in 1891 by Canadian James Naismith. He would later recognize the Grads as “the finest basketball team that ever stepped out on a floor.”

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    9 November 2020
    Marie Dressler's 152nd birthday






    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 152nd birthday of Oscar-winning Canadian-American stage and screen actress, comedian, and singer Marie Dressler, who is widely considered one of the most significant actors of early-1930s film. With her signature style of raucous slapstick humor, Dressler challenged stereotypes to become one of Hollywood’s most unconventional stars.

    Marie Dressler was born Leila Marie Koerber on this day in 1868 in Cobourg, a Canadian town on the shore of Lake Ontario. She began acting with stock companies by the age of 14. Over the following years, Dressler showcased her comedic chops in vaudeville, burlesque, and revue performances and ascended from local theater all the way to Broadway musicals.

    By 1896, Dressler was a certified theater phenomenon. She reached the apex of her stage career in the 1910 Broadway hit “Tillie’s Nightmare,” which was adapted for the big screen four years later. The result was the first-ever feature-length comedy film “Tillie’s Punctured Romance”—a massive box office hit in which Dressler co-starred alongside a young Charlie Chaplin.

    Dressler’s rich stage voice proved a perfect fit for the “talkie” films that came along in the late ‘20s. She delivered a show-stealing performance in the 1930 drama “Anna Christie,” and the following year, her talent was recognized at the highest level when she won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the 1930 film “Min and Bill.”

    Happy birthday to a legendary star whose talent and humor knew no bounds.

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    9 November 2015
    Hedy Lamarr's 101st birthday






    [Turn on your audio.]

    We lovehighlightingthemanygoodstoriesabout women’s achievements in science and technology. When the story involves a 1940s Hollywood star-turned-inventor who helped develop technologies we all use with our smartphones today… well, we just have to share it with the world.

    Today on Google’s homepage we’re celebrating Hedy Lamarr, the Austrian-born actress Hollywood once dubbed “the most beautiful woman in the world.” Lamarr’s own story reads like a movie script: bored by the film industry and feeling typecast, Lamarr was more interested in helping the Allied war effort as World War II broke out than in the roles she was being offered. She had some background in military munitions [yes, really], and together with a composer friend, George Antheil, used the principles of how pianos worked [[yep, pianos) to identify a way to prevent German submarines from jamming Ally radio signals. The patent for “frequency hopping” Lamarr co-authored laid the groundwork for widely-used technologies like Bluetooth, GPS and wifi that we rely upon daily.

    It’s no wonder, then, that Lamarr has kind of a mythical status at Google, and I was pretty excited at the chance to tell her story in Doodle form. This took some tinkering of my own—after deciding on the movie format as a nod to her Hollywood career, I dug through old fashion illustrations and movie posters to try to capture the look and feel of the 1940’s. Sketching storyboards on a yellow notepad helped me figure out how to show Lamarr in very different scenarios—movie star by day, inventor by night—which we then animated and set to the awesome soundtrack created by composer Adam Ever-Hadani.

    Jennifer Hom, Doodler
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 07:10 AM.

  12. #4212
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    9 November 2016
    Bang Jeong-hwan’s 117th Birthday





    In 1923 Korea, children were treated as 'lesser' adults. Bang Jeong-hwan, a children's writer from Seoul, changed all that when he invented the term eorini, a more respectful term for children than the one commonly used. He started a magazine by the same name, to spread the notion that children should be celebrated. Today's Doodle depicts Jeong-hwan flying through the sky, holding a copy of the magazine he founded, symbolizing his commitment to championing the children of Korea.

    Happy 117th birthday, Bang Jeong-hwan!
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 07:22 AM.

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    9 November 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Count von Count



    Count von Count is a mysterious but friendly vampire-like Muppet on Sesame Street who is meant to parody Bela Lugosi's portrayal of Count Dracula. He first appeared on the show in the Season 4 premiere in 1972, counting blocks in a sketch with Bert and Ernie.

  14. #4214
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    10 Nov 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street






    Sesame Street is an American educational children's television series that combines live-action, sketch comedy, animation and puppetry. It is produced by Sesame Workshop [known as the Children's Television Workshop [CTW] until June 2000] and was created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett. The program is known for its images communicated through the use of Jim Henson's Muppets, and includes short films, with humor and cultural references. The series premiered on November 10, 1969, to positive reviews, some controversy, and high viewership; it has aired on the US's national public television provider PBS since its debut, with its first run moving to premium channel HBO on January 16, 2016, then its sister streaming service HBO Max in 2020.

  15. #4215
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    8 Nov 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Elmo



  16. #4216
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    8 November 2020
    Purushottam Laxman Deshpande’s 101st birthday






    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Mumbai-based guest artist Sameer Kulavoor, celebrates the 101st birthday of legendary Indian writer, playwright, musician, composer, actor, director, and philanthropist Purushottam Laxman Deshpande, widely known by his Marathi initials “Pu La.” Renowned for his signature style of joyful humor and satire, Deshpande brought smiles to the faces of countless readers and audiences with his multifaceted contributions to Marathi literature and the performing arts.

    Purushottam Laxman Deshpande was born on this day in 1919 in Bombay [now Mumbai], India. He earned a master’s degree and served as a college lecturer before he began to pursue a career in music. A master of the harmonium [[also known as the reed organ), he played as an accompanist for acclaimed vocal artists of the day and released his own hit recordings as well. But music was far from Deshpande’s only creative talent, and in the late 1940s, his writing premiered in Bombay magazine.

    Throughout a long and varied career, Deshpande produced a prolific collection of writing which included novels, essays, comedy books, travelogues, children’s plays, and one-man stage shows—much of which saw massive popularity, particularly in his home state of Maharashtra. In addition, Deshpande acted in dozens of films, many of which he directed himself.

    In the 1990s, Deshpande and his wife established a philanthropic foundation in his name which in the years since has carried on his positive legacy through the promotion of a variety of social and cultural causes.

    Happy birthday, P. L. Deshpande, and thank you for sharing your humor and harmony with the people of Maharashtra and beyond.

  17. #4217
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    8 November 2011
    Edmond Halley's 355th Birthday







    Edmond Halley, was an English astronomer, geophysicist, mathematician, meteorologist, and physicist. He was the second Astronomer Royal in Britain, succeeding John Flamsteed in 1720.

    From an observatory he constructed on Saint Helena, Halley recorded a transit of Mercury across the Sun. He realised a similar transit of Venus could be used to determine the size of the Solar System. He also used his observations to expand contemporary star maps. He aided in observationally proving Isaac Newton's laws of motion, and funded the publication of Newton's influential Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica. From his September 1682 observations, he used the laws of motion to compute the periodicity of Halley's Comet in his 1705 Synopsis of the Astronomy of Comets. It was named after him upon its predicted return in 1758, which he did not live to see.

    Beginning in 1698, he made sailing expeditions and made observations on the conditions of terrestrial magnetism. In 1718, he discovered the proper motion of the "fixed" stars.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 07:37 AM.

  18. #4218
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    9 Nov 2011
    Hideyo Noguchi's 135th Birthday







    Hideyo Noguchiwas a prominent Japanese bacteriologist who in 1911 discovered the agent of syphilis as the cause of progressive paralytic disease.

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    7 Nov 2011
    Marie Curie's 144th Birthday






    A pioneer in the sciences, Marie Curie's research led to such achievements as the discovery of polonium and radium and the development of the theory of radioactivity. Her life's work earned her two Nobel Prizes and solidified her place in history as an icon in physics and chemistry.

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    7 November 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Oscar the Grouch




    Oscar the Grouch is a fictional character on the PBS/HBO television program Sesame Street. He has a green body, no visible nose, and lives in a trash can. Oscar's favorite thing is trash, as evidenced by the song "I Love Trash", with a running theme being his collection of seemingly useless items. Although the term "Grouch" aptly describes Oscar's misanthropic interaction with the other characters, it also refers to his species.

    The character was originally performed by Caroll Spinney from the show's first episode until his official retirement in 2018. Eric Jacobson began understudying for the character in 2015, and officially took on the full role after Spinney's retirement in 2018.

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    7 November 2013
    Ary Barroso's 110th Birthday





    Ary de Resende Barroso was a Brazilian composer, pianist, soccer commentator, and talent-show host on radio and TV. He was one of Brazil's most successful songwriters in the first half of the 20th century. Barroso also composed many songs for Carmen Miranda during her career.

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    6 November 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Bert & Ernie


    Bert and Ernie were built by Don Sahlin from a simple design scribbled by Jim Henson, creator of The Muppets. Initially, Henson performed Bert and Oz performed Ernie, but after just one day of rehearsal, they switched characters. The original idea was to show that even though two people can have totally different characteristics, they can still be good friends.

    According to writer Jon Stone, the relationship between Bert and Ernie reflected the real life friendship between Oz and Henson. Although their names are commonly believed to have been drawn from those of two minor characters in the Frank Capra film It's A Wonderful Life, sources from within the Sesame Street production team suggest that the identical names were coincidental.

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    4 November 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Big Bird




    Big Bird is a Muppet character on the long-running PBS/HBO children's television show Sesame Street. An eight-foot two-inch [249 cm] tall bright yellow anthropomorphic bird, he can roller skate, ice skate, dance, swim, sing, write poetry, draw, and ride a unicycle. Despite this wide array of talents, he is prone to frequent misunderstandings, on one occasion even singing the alphabet as one long word [from the song called "ABC-DEF-GHI," ], pondering what it could mean. He would refer to grocer Mr. Hooper as "Mr. Looper", among other mispronunciations. He lives in a large nest behind the 123 Sesame Street brownstone and right next to Oscar the Grouch's trash can and he has a teddy bear named Radar. In Season 46, Big Bird's large nest is now sitting within a small, furnished maple tree, and is no longer hidden by used construction doors.

    Caroll Spinney originally performed Big Bird from 1969 to 2018. As of 2020, Big Bird is performed by Matt Vogel who began in 1998 as an understudy before becoming the character's full-time performer in 2018.

    In 2000, Big Bird was named a Living Legend by the United States Library of Congress.


    [below] 2019 Kennedy Center Honors






    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 08:04 AM.

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    2 Nov 2014
    Day of the Dead 2014






    The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday celebrated in Mexico and elsewhere associated with the Catholic celebrations of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day, and is held on November 1 and 2. The multi-day holiday involves family and friends gathering to pray for and to remember friends and family members who have died. It is commonly portrayed as a day of celebration rather than mourning. Mexican academics are divided on whether the festivity has indigenous pre-Hispanic roots or whether it is a 20th-century rebranded version of a Spanish tradition developed by the presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas to encourage Mexican nationalism through an "Aztec" identity. The festivity has become a national symbol and as such is taught in the nation's school system, typically asserting a native origin. In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

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    3 Nov 2014
    114th anniversary of the premiere of The Tale of Tsar Saltan





    Our doodle in Russia today depicts a scene from the 20th century opera, The Tale of Tsar Saltan, for the libretto’s 114th anniversary.

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    3 November 2012
    Samuil Marshak's 125th Birthday







    Samuil Yakovlevich Marshak was a Russian and Soviet writer of Jewish origin, translator and poet who wrote for both children and adults. He translated the sonnets and some other of the works of William Shakespeare, English poetry [including poems for children], and poetry from other languages. Maxim Gorky proclaimed Marshak to be "the founder of Russia's [Soviet] children's literature."

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    3 November 2011
    Oodgeroo Noonuccal's 91st Birthday






    Oodgeroo Noonuccal was an Aboriginal Australian political activist, artist and educator, who campaigned for Aboriginal rights. Noonuccal was best known for her poetry, and was the first Aboriginal Australian to publish a book of verse.

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    13 April 2018
    177th Anniversary of Semper Opera House





    One hundred seventy-seven years ago today, the Semper Opera House [or Semperoper] opened its doors for the first time. Originally designed by the famous German architect Gottfried Semper, it has served as the stage for opera, ballet, and performances of many kinds during its nearly 200-year-long history.

    The Semperoper has newly opened its doors not once, but three times: first after its original construction in 1841, and twice more after rebuilding due to both a devastating fire in 1869 and the WWII firestorm in 1945. The architecture evolved from its first construction – an eclectic blend of early Renaissance, Baroque, and and Greek classical styles – to the familiar Neo-Renaissance elements seen today. Semper’s consideration of the audience is evident in the design, too; all tiers sit equidistant to the stage and no partitions exist between sections. Without much to block the performers, everyone gets a good seat!

    The creator of today’s Doodle, Frederik Jurk, employed gentle colors and soft, flowing lines to capture the dreamy scenes and romantic characters so frequently featured on this famous stage. "Since the subject of the doodle is already about art," he says, "letting everything speak for itself felt very natural." All set against the backdrop of the iconic architecture, the image couples the art of the building’s construction with the creativity of the artists themselves.

    Thanks to the dedication of Germany’s arts community, Semperoper stands today as a storied monument to some of the country’s most influential composers, conductors, and singers.

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    13 April 2021
    151st anniversary of The Metropolitan Museum of Art







    In honor of a storied legacy of cultural enrichment for New Yorkers and international communities alike, today’s Doodle celebrates the 151st Anniversary of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens—businessmen and financiers as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day—who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. On this day in 1870, the museum was officially incorporated and soon after acquired its first work of art: a Roman sarcophagus.

    The Met has come quite a long way from that first showing to become New York’s largest art museum, with a permanent collection of over 1.5 million objects, spanning over 5,000 years from nearly every corner of the globe. A sampling of the many works of art found at The Met today are depicted in today’s Doodle artwork—including a Byzantine floor mosaic from 500-550 A.D., the armor of German Emperor Ferdinand I from the 16th century, an intricate traditional Lakota/Teton Sioux beaded dress, and the painting "Self-Portrait" by Samuel Joseph Brown, Jr. from the 1940s.

    Whether you're a Met regular or planning your first trip to the Museum, be sure to visit a certain blue ceramic hippopotamus from Egypt’s Middle Kingdom nicknamed “William.” An unofficial mascot of The Met, he might soon become your favorite part of the collection.
    Happy anniversary to The Met–and here’s to many more!

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    14 Apr 2021
    Celebrating Johannes Gutenberg







    When it comes to first impressions, no other historical figure made one quite like the inventor of the mechanical movable type printing press: German craftsman Johannes Gutenberg. This revolutionary technology made the knowledge found in books both affordable and accessible to the common person for the first time in history. Today’s Doodle celebrates Gutenberg on the anniversary of this day in 2000 when the Gutenberg Museum launched a retrospective exhibition in his honor.

    Although much of Gutenberg’s life is shrouded in mystery, historical records indicate he was born circa 1400 in Mainz, Germany, and first made his living as a metalworker in the goldsmith trade. By the late 1430s, historians believe Gutenberg began to develop a more efficient text printing device in an attempt to pay off debts from a failed mirror business. The machine he invented [essentially a retrofitted winepress] replaced the hand-carved wooden letter and graphic blocks of traditional printers for easily-cast metal type, which were then dipped in proprietary ink to print entire pages at once.

    Gutenberg’s next eureka moment came in 1450 with his invention’s first successful print: a Latin book on speech-making. From here, Gutenberg was off to the races as he innovated labor by hiring an assembly-line team to produce books quicker than ever! A testament to the power of human creativity, the Gutenberg press printed up to 3,600 pages on an average workday, fueling the first large-scale production of books in Europe.

    By the 16th century, an estimated 200 million books were in print thanks to his invention, which gave birth to a new era of mass communication and a new branch of media: the press. Today, Gutenberg’s legacy lives on with Project Gutenberg, an online library with over 60,000 free books.
    Thank you, Johannes Gutenberg!

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    14 Apr 2021
    Pohela Boishakh






    Today’s Doodle commemorates the festival of Pohela Boishakh, which falls on the first day of the Bengali calendar. Whether at home or abroad, Bengalis worldwide warmly greet each other with, Shubho Noboborsho, the customary way to wish each other a prosperous and happy New Year.

    One of the most traditional Pohela Boishakh celebrations commences after dawn underneath an ancient Banyan tree at Dhaka’s Ramna Park. Mangal Shobhajatra is a radiant carnival procession that begins at the Institute of Fine Arts at Dhaka University. The festive spirit blends young and old, as they wear colorful masks and parade with massive cutouts of animals as a way to symbolize Bengali cultural diversity, heritage, and identity of the people.

    The nation celebrates with street parades, fairs, and grand concerts as a way to unify the Bengalis to welcome another year to come.

    Shubho Nobobarsho!

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    15 Apr 2021
    Eugène Poubelle’s 190th birthday








    Today’s Doodle celebrates Eugène Poubelle, the French lawyer, administrator, and diplomat credited with revolutionizing Paris’s waste management system in the late 19th century. Never afraid to get his hands dirty, Poubelle is forever immortalized in the French word for the trash can: la poubelle.

    Born in Caen, France on this day in 1831, Eugène René Poubelle earned a law degree and began his career as a professor before transitioning into public service. In 1883, he was appointed prefect of the Seine, and he soon came to the conclusion that Paris needed to clean up its act.

    In 1884, Poubelle decreed that Parisian landlords were required to install large, covered receptacles for their tenants’ household trash, and—far ahead of his time—he even mandated three separate bins to facilitate recycling. In 1890, la poubelle was officially inducted into the French dictionary as the term for “garbage can.”

    But Poubelle didn’t stop there. Following a severe cholera outbreak in 1892, he also required all buildings to be connected directly to the city’s sewers, another huge step in the name of urban hygiene. Poubelle’s mandates also catalyzed the development of household waste removal vehicles, early versions of which came in the form of horse-drawn carriages. With the advent of the first automobiles, these prototypical garbage trucks evolved into motorized vehicles in 1897; by the dawn of the 20th-century, this sanitation technology cleared the path for garbage collection to become commonplace not just in French urban centers but nationwide.

    Thank you, Eugène Poubelle, for refusing to let your visionary ideas be thrown out!

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    17 Apr 2021
    Celebrating Laura Bassi








    Newton’s second law of motion states that an object’s acceleration is dependent on two variables: the force acting on the object and its mass. Apply this law to the momentum of women in science, and Italian physicist and professor—Laura Bassi—arises as a primary force for propelling scientific progress forward. On this day in 1732, Bassi successfully defended 49 theses to become one of the first women in Europe to receive a PhD.

    Today’s Doodle celebrates Laura Maria Catarina Bassi, who was born in Bologna, Papal States [[modern-day Italy) in 1711. A child prodigy, she was debating top academics on the history of philosophy and physics by 20; a rare achievement at a time in which women were largely excluded from higher education.

    By 1732, Bassi was a household name in Bologna, and following her thesis defense, she became the first female member of the Bologna Academy of Sciences, one of Italy’s foremost scientific institutions. Due to gender discrimination, her position at the Academy was limited, yet she persisted. Bassi apprenticed under eminent Bologna professors to learn calculus and Newtonian physics, a discipline she spread across Italy for almost 50 years. A lifelong teacher of physics and philosophy, she complemented her education with innovative research and experiments on subjects ranging from electricity to hydraulics.

    Bassi continually fought for gender equality in education throughout her trailblazing career; efforts that culminated in 1776 when the Bologna Academy of Sciences appointed her a professor of experimental physics—making Bassi the first woman offered an official teaching position at a European university.

    Here’s to you, Laura Bassi!

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    19 Apr 2021
    Vera Gedroits’ 151st birthday






    Today’s Doodle celebrates Russian surgeon, professor, poet, and author Dr. Vera Gedroits on her 151st birthday. Dr. Gedroits is credited as the country’s first female military surgeon and one of the world’s first female professors of surgery, who saved countless lives through her fearless service and innovations in the field of wartime medicine.

    Vera Ignatievna Gedroits was born on this day in 1870 into a prominent family of Lithuanian royal descent in Kiev, then part of the Russian Empire. In her late teens, she left Russia to study medicine in Switzerland. Dr. Gedroits returned home at the turn of the 20th century, and she soon began her pioneering medical career as the surgeon at a factory hospital.

    When the Russo-Japanese War broke out in 1904, Dr. Gedroits volunteered as a surgeon on a Red Cross hospital train. Under threat of enemy fire, she performed complex abdominal operations in a converted railway car with such unprecedented success that her technique was adopted as the new standard by the Russian government. Following her battlefield service, Dr. Gedroits worked as a surgeon for the Russian royal family before her return home to Kiev, where she was appointed professor of surgery at the University of Kiev in 1929.

    She authored several medical papers on nutrition and surgical treatments during her time as a professor, but her talent as a writer was not limited to academics. Dr. Gedroits also published multiple collections of poems, and several nonfiction works, including the 1931 memoir simply titled “Life,” which told the story of her personal journey that led to service on the front lines in 1904.

    Thank you, Vera Gedroits, for pushing the world of medicine forward, even with the odds stacked against you.

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    20 Apr 2021
    Luther Vandross's 70th birthday







    Today’s video Doodle, created by Atlanta-based guest artist Sam Bass, celebrates the 70th birthday of multi-platinum, Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, and producer Luther Vandross—the “Velvet Voice” whose silky-smooth tenor ballads romanced generations with inimitable style and grace.

    Born on this day in 1951 in New York City, Luther Ronzoni Vandross grew up inspired by soul music giants such as Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, and Dionne Warwick. At the age of five, he showed a sharp interest in singing, often using the coin-operated recording booths found in stores sprinkled throughout New York City at the time. He truly knew music was his destiny after a Warwick performance blew him away at 13—so he began to write his own songs. After high school, Vandross showcased his tunes at Amateur Night at Harlem’s Apollo Theater. Although he never won first place, he joined the theater’s performing arts group “Listen My Brother Revue,” who sang on the 1969 pilot episode of the children’s show “Sesame Street” and gave Vandross his first taste of widespread exposure.

    Vandross’s next big break came when his original composition “Everybody Rejoice” was featured in “The Wiz,” a 1974 Broadway musical later adapted into an Academy Award-winning film. From there, Vandross launched himself into dozens of collaborative projects with artists like David Bowie, Ringo Starr, Whitney Houston, and Ben E. King. His knack for infectious hooks also landed him gigs singing commercial jingles for Juicy Fruit and several other major brands.

    In 1981, Vandross launched his solo career and took full creative control to compose, write, and produce his debut studio album “Never Too Much”—the soundtrack of today’s Doodle and the first of 14 studio albums that went either platinum or multi-platinum! A fine-tuned maestro of performance, Vandross took his passionate songs on world-wide tours, where he poured his style into all aspects of live production, from the design of background singers sparkling gowns to the mood-setting stage lights. In 1989, Vandross’s devotion to the live experience set an international milestone when he became the first male artist to sell out 10 consecutive shows at London’s Wembley Arena.

    Vandross’s successful music career culminated in eight Grammy Awards [out of 33 nominations], a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, a 1997 Super Bowl half-time show performance, and eight Billboard Top 10 albums.

    Happy birthday, Luther Vandross! The joy your music brings to the world is never too much.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 05:21 PM.

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    22 Apr 2021
    Earth Day 2021






    This year’s annual Earth Day Doodle highlights how everyone can plant the seed to a brighter future—one sapling at a time!

    The planet we call home continues to nurture life and inspire wonder. Our environment works hard to sustain us, which calls for us to return the favor. Today’s video Doodle shows a variety of trees being planted within natural habitats, one of the many ways we can do our part to keep our Earth healthy for future generations.

    This Earth Day—and everyday—we encourage everyone to find one small act they can do to restore our Earth. It’s bound to take root and blossom into something beautiful.
    Happy Earth Day 2021!

    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 05:23 PM.

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    23 Apr 2021
    Celebrating the letter Ñ






    Today’s Doodle artwork, illustrated by Barcelona-based guest artist Min, commemorates the consonant Ñ [pronounced “enye”]. The only letter in the Spanish alphabet that originated in Spain, the Ñ is not only a letter but a representation of Hispanic heritage and identity as well.

    The Ñ’s story started with 12th-century Spanish scribes. While hand-copying Latin manuscripts, these scholars of the Middle Ages devised a plan to save time and parchment by shortening words with double letters. They combined the two figures into one and scrawled on top a tiny “n”—a symbol now known as a ”virgulilla” or tilde—to signify the change. Thus, “annus,” Latin for “year,” evolved into the Spanish “año.”

    In 1803, it was officially entered into the Royal Spanish Academy’s dictionary, and in 1993, Spain passed legislation to protect its inclusion in computer keyboards on the grounds of its insuppressible cultural significance. In 2010, the United Nations declared April 23 a day to annually celebrate the Spanish language, one of the most commonly spoken in the world.

    Today, the letter Ñ appears in more than 17,700 Spanish words, carving out a fundamental role within the language and Hispanic culture.

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    23 April 2016
    Celebrating William Shakespeare






    Genius. There are many examples throughout human history, but today we celebrate one particularly brilliant one: William Shakespeare — writer, playwright, and one of the most eloquent voices of all time. Today, we celebrate his life and work.

    A creative tour de force, Shakespeare officially wrote 38 plays in his 52 years, performing most of them at The Globe Theatre in London. Over the past four centuries, Shakespeare's poems, plays and other works have taken on a life of their own on stage, screen, and page. You can explore some of his works and those he has has inspired in the Shakespeare gallery of the Google Cultural Institute.

    Here's to many more lifetimes of the Bard's great verse.


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    27 Apr 2016
    Pencho Slaveykov’s 150th birthday







    Walk through Slaveykov Square in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, and you'll come across two figures seated on a bench. They are the statues of the poet and critic Pencho Slaveykov, and his father Petko, also a poet.

    Slaveykov's poetry is best known for its pensive, brooding nature, as reflected in Kevin Laughlin’s Doodle. Inspired by Western European writers like Henrik Ibsen, Heinrich Heine, and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Slaveykov introduced the figure of the individual artist into a folkloric tradition more associated with morals and the masses. A central figure of the Misal ["Thought"] circle of writers, Slaveykov created a new and modern vision for Bulgarian literature.

    Happy birthday, Pencho Slaveykov, who was born 150 years ago today.

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    27 Apr 2016
    Freedom Day 2016






    This important day marks the time that South Africa broke long-standing boundaries created by apartheid with its first ever democratic election. On this historic occasion, citizens of all races and backgrounds could finally vote. Freedom Day has become a symbol of peace, unity, and the hard-earned freedom now enjoyed throughout the country.

    This year’s doodle is a tribute to the post-apartheid generation, the bright future of South Africa.

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    4 Nov 2009
    20th Anniversary of the Wallace and Gromit Characters





    Wallace & Gromit is a British stop motion comedy franchise created by Nick Park of Aardman Animations. The series consists of four short films and one feature-length film, but has spawned numerous spin-offs and TV adaptations. The series centres on Wallace, a good-natured, eccentric, cheese-loving inventor, along with his companion Gromit, a silent yet loyal and intelligent anthropomorphic dog. The first short film, A Grand Day Out, was finished and made public in 1989.

    Wallace was originally voiced by veteran actor Peter Sallis and later by Ben Whitehead. Gromit is largely silent, communicating through facial expressions and body language.

    Because of their widespread popularity, the characters have been described as positive international cultural icons of both modern British culture and British people in general. BBC News called them "some of the best-known and best-loved stars to come out of the UK". Icons has said they have done "more to improve the image of the English world-wide than any officially appointed ambassadors".

    Although not overtly set in any particular town, Park has hinted that it was inspired by 1950s Wigan in the north of England. Wallace's accent comes from the Holme Valley of West Yorkshire. Wallace is fond of Wensleydale cheese [from Wensleydale, North Yorkshire].

    Their films have received critical acclaim, with the first three of the short films, A Grand Day Out [1989], The Wrong Trousers [1993] and A Close Shave [1995], all broadcast in the U.S. on PBS, and all being extremely well received; the feature film The Curse of the Were-Rabbit [2005] receiving similar acclaim. The feature film is the second-highest-grossing stop-motion animated film ever, only outgrossed by Chicken Run, another creation of Park's. Aardman Animation won the Peabody Award in 1995 for Wallace & Gromit.


    The Wallace and Gromit characters spearhead the fundraising for two children's charities: Wallace & Gromit's Children's Foundation, which supports children's hospices and hospitals in the United Kingdom, and Wallace and Gromit's Grand Appeal, the charity for Bristol Children's Hospital in Bristol, England.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 01:39 PM.

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    4 November 2020
    Miliki's 91st birthday






    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Spain-based guest artist Cinta Arribas, celebrates Spanish clown, actor, director, writer, singer, and composer Emilio Aragón Bermúdez, known fondly by his stage name Miliki. Among his many artistic accomplishments, Aragón starred in the Spanish children’s program “El Gran Circo de TVE” [“TVE’s Great Circus”] which is widely considered one of the most iconic shows in the history of Spanish television.

    Emilio Alberto Aragón Bermúdez was born on this day in 1929 in the town of Carmona in southwestern Spain. The son of a clown and an equestrian acrobatics specialist, Aragón honed his talent for performance art as a child surrounded by entertainers. Determined to carry on the family tradition, Aragón launched his clowning career by the age of 11, performing with his brothers at venues like Madrid’s legendary Circo Price [Price Circus].

    The siblings moved to Cuba in the 1940s and achieved fame over the following decades as they showcased their endearing talents across the Americas. They found their way back to Spain in 1972 and the very next year, they took Spanish television by storm as the hosts of the children’s show which eventually became known as “El Gran Circo de TVE.”

    After a hugely successful decade on air, Aragón moved beyond his identity as a clown and throughout the rest of his career explored new endeavors as a writer, TV presenter, filmmaker, and recording musician—a talent which earned him two Latin Grammy Awards.

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    6 November 2017
    Jackie Forster’s 91st Birthday







    It is quite an achievement to leave a lasting legacy. Jackie Forster is known for two: first, for her charismatic TV news reporting; second, for her trailblazing gay rights activism.

    Born on this day in 1926, Jackie launched her famed career first in acting, appearing in various West End productions and films in the 1940s. She moved to television news under her maiden name, Jackie Mackenzie, and became a favorite of producers and the public with her sharp, lively, and quirky delivery. Her coverage of the wedding of Prince Rainier to Princess Grace in 1956 won her the Prix d’Italia.

    Thirteen years later, Jackie made history by publicly coming out as gay, paving the way for many other women of the time. Soon after, she appeared on a host of television programs, speaking openly about her identity and helping viewers find the strength to accept themselves. She walked proudly in the first gay rights march in the UK and co-founded Sappho, an English lesbian magazine and social club.

    Today’s Doodle by London-based illustrator Hannah Warren celebrates 91 years of Forster’s passion and pioneering spirit.

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    6 November 2007
    Melbourne Cup 2007






    The Melbourne Cup is Australia's most famous annual Thoroughbred horse race. It is a 3200-metre race for three-year-olds and over, conducted by the Victoria Racing Club on the Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne, Victoria as part of the Melbourne Spring Racing Carnival. It is the richest "two-mile" handicap in the world and one of the richest turf races. The event starts at 3:00 pm on the first Tuesday of November and is known locally as "the race that stops the nation".

    The Melbourne Cup has a long tradition, with the first race held in 1861. It was originally over two miles [3.219 km] but was shortened to 3,200 metres [1.988 mi] in 1972 when Australia adopted the metric system. This reduced the distance by 18.688 metres [61.312 ft], and Rain Lover's 1968 race record of 3:19.1 was accordingly adjusted to 3:17.9. The present record holder is the 1990 winner Kingston Rule with a time of 3:16.3.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 05:35 PM.

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    5 November 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Cookie Monster





    Cookie Monster is a blue Muppet character on the long-running PBS/HBO children's television show Sesame Street. In a song in 2007, and later in an interview in 2017, Cookie Monster revealed that his real name is Sidney Monster. He is best known for his voracious appetite and his famous eating catchphrases, such as "Me want cookie!" Although he eats almost anything, including normally inedible objects, as his name suggests, his preferred food is cookies. Chocolate chip cookies are his favorite kind. Despite his voracious appetite for cookies, Cookie Monster shows awareness of healthy eating habits for young children and also enjoys fruits and eggplant.

    He is known to have a mother, a younger sister, and an identically-designed cousin [who does not like cookies]. All three share his characteristic navy blue fur and "googly eyes". He also has a father, who appeared in a Monsterpiece Theater sketch promoting energy conservation, water conservation and environmentalism. Cookie Monster's mother and father both share his enormous appetite and craving for cookies. He and his Sesame Street friends are popular motifs on T-shirts.

    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 05:46 PM.

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    21 Jan 2008
    Dr Martin Luther King Day 2008






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    28 Jan 2008
    50th Anniversary of the LEGO Brick







    Lego is a line of plastic construction toys that are manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Billund, Denmark. The company's flagship product, Lego, consists of variously coloured interlocking plastic bricks accompanying an array of gears, figurines called minifigures, and various other parts. Lego pieces can be assembled and connected in many ways to construct objects, including vehicles, buildings, and working robots. Anything constructed can be taken apart again, and the pieces reused to make new things.

    The Lego Group began manufacturing the interlocking toy bricks in 1949. Movies, games, competitions and eight Legoland amusement parks have been developed under the brand. As of July 2015, 600 billion Lego parts had been produced.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-14-2021 at 06:25 PM.

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    3 Mar 2008
    Alexander Graham Bell's 161st Birthday







    Alexander Graham Bell was a Scottish-born inventor, scientist, and engineer who is credited with inventing and patenting the first practical telephone. He also co-founded the American Telephone and Telegraph Company [AT&T] in 1885.

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    19 Mar 2008
    Las Fallas 2008






    The
    Fallas is a traditional celebration held annually in commemoration of Saint Joseph in the city of Valencia, Spain. The five main days celebrated are from 15 to 19 March, while the Mascletà, a pyrotechnic spectacle of firecracker detonation and fireworks display, takes place every day from 1 to 19 March. The term Falles refers to both the celebration and the monuments burnt during the celebration. A number of towns in the Valencian Community have similar celebrations inspired by the original Falles de València celebration. The Falles festival was added to UNESCO's intangible cultural heritage of humanity list on 30 November 2016.

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    24 Mar 2008
    Béla Bartók's 127th Birthday






    Béla Viktor János Bartók was a Hungarian composer, pianist, and ethnomusicologist. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century; he and Franz Liszt are regarded as Hungary's greatest composers. Through his collection and analytical study of folk music, he was one of the founders of comparative musicology, which later became ethnomusicology.

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