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Thread: Google doodles

  1. #12851
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    13 April 2011

    240th Birthday of Richard Trevithick



    Richard Trevithick was a British inventor and mining engineer. The son of a mining captain, and born in the mining heartland of Cornwall, Trevithick was immersed in mining and engineering from an early age. He was an early pioneer of steam-powered road and rail transport, and his most significant contributions were the development of the first high-pressure steam engine and the first working railway steam locomotive. The world's first locomotive-hauled railway journey took place on 21 February 1804, when Trevithick's unnamed steam locomotive hauled a train along the tramway of the Penydarren Ironworks, in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales.

  2. #12852
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    13 April 2018

    177th Anniversary of Semper Opera House




    One hundred seventy-seven years ago today, the Semper Opera House [or Semperoper] opened its doors for the first time. Originally designed by the famous German architect Gottfried Semper, it has served as the stage for opera, ballet, and performances of many kinds during its nearly 200-year-long history.

    The Semperoper has newly opened its doors not once, but three times: first after its original construction in 1841, and twice more after rebuilding due to both a devastating fire in 1869 and the WWII firestorm in 1945. The architecture evolved from its first construction – an eclectic blend of early Renaissance, Baroque, and and Greek classical styles – to the familiar Neo-Renaissance elements seen today. Semper’s consideration of the audience is evident in the design, too; all tiers sit equidistant to the stage and no partitions exist between sections. Without much to block the performers, everyone gets a good seat!

    The creator of today’s Doodle, Frederik Jurk, employed gentle colors and soft, flowing lines to capture the dreamy scenes and romantic characters so frequently featured on this famous stage. "Since the subject of the doodle is already about art," he says, "letting everything speak for itself felt very natural." All set against the backdrop of the iconic architecture, the image couples the art of the building’s construction with the creativity of the artists themselves.

    Thanks to the dedication of Germany’s arts community, Semperoper stands today as a storied monument to some of the country’s most influential composers, conductors, and singers.

  3. #12853
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    13 April 2017

    Celebrating Henrietta Augusta Dugdale




    On this date in 1869, the Melbourne Argus published a momentous letter. It was written by Australian feminist and suffragist Henrietta Augusta Dugdale, and its demand was simple but profound: equal justice for women. Dugdale made this plea in response to a bill that claimed to secure property rights for women but did not go far enough. Known for using fiery, provocative language, Dugdale called the bill a "poor and partial remedy for a great and crying evil" and a "piece of the grossest injustice."

    Born in 1827 in London, Dugdale moved to Melbourne in 1852. She soon became a prominent figure in the Australian women's rights movement, and she served as president of the first Victorian Women's Suffrage Society. Her 1883 booklet A Few Hours in a Far-Off Age envisioned a utopian future of equality, intelligence, and social justice. Dugdale's inspiring letters and rousing speeches helped make Australia the second country to grant women the right to vote, in 1902.

    Today, we pay tribute to a woman who knew the power of her pen, and used it to fight for equal justice and rights for women.

  4. #12854
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    28 Nov 2021

    35th anniversary of Taroko National Park




    In the language of Taiwan’s indigenous Truku people, taroko means magnificent or beautiful. Taroko Park—the Truku people’s ancestral home—reflects the grandiosity of its title as one of Taiwan’s nine national parks. Today’s Doodle celebrates this protected park on the 35th anniversary of the day it was established to formally conserve the nation’s natural beauty and biodiversity. The Doodle artwork depicts the Taroko Gorge Waterfalls and the Eternal Spring Shrine.

    From the precipitous white marble walls of Taroko Gorge to the active steam vents of Taiwan’s tallest volcano Mount Qixing, Taroko Park serves as an epicenter of scientific research and environmental education. The reserve spans over 350 square miles, ranging across an expansive Pacific shoreline to 140 rugged mountain peaks—27 of which stand among the nation’s 100 tallest mountains! These peaks were formed by the collision of two massive tectonic plates over millions of years, and the Central Mountain Range continues to be elevated by several millimeters annually.

    As a gathering place for outdoor adventurists and wildlife enthusiasts alike, Taroko’s widely varied geography creates several climate zones that provide habitats for hundreds of species of flora and fauna. The alpine forests of the park’s higher elevations support tree-dwelling mammals like the Formosan rock macaque, Taiwan’s only indigenous primate. Its lower regions harbor an exceptional collection of plant and animal life, including over 300 butterfly species.

    Happy 35th Anniversary, Taroko National Park!

  5. #12855
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    9 May 2012

    Royal Ploughing Ceremony and Farmer's Day




    The Royal Ploughing Ceremony, also known as The Ploughing Festival, is an ancient royal rite held in many Asian countries to mark the traditional beginning of the rice growing season. The royal ploughing ceremony, called Lehtun Mingala or Mingala Ledaw, was also practiced in pre-colonial Burma until 1885 when the monarchy was abolished
    Last edited by 9A; 11-27-2022 at 07:56 AM.

  6. #12856
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    19 May 2014

    Rubik's Cube


    The Rubik's Cube is a 3-D combination puzzle originally invented in 1974 by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. Originally called the Magic Cube, the puzzle was licensed by Rubik to be sold by Pentangle Puzzles in the UK in 1978, and then by Ideal Toy Corp in 1980 via businessman Tibor Laczi and Seven Towns founder Tom Kremer. The cube was released internationally in 1980 and became one of the most recognized icons in popular culture. It won the 1980 German Game of the Year special award for Best Puzzle. As of January 2009, 350 million cubes had been sold worldwide,[needs update] making it the world's bestselling puzzle game and bestselling toy.

  7. #12857
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    19 May 2019

    Samuel Okwaraji’s 55th Birthday



    Today’s Doodle celebrates Nigerian soccer player Samuel Okwaraji, who stands today as a symbol of national pride. Born in Orlu, Nigeria on this day in 1964, he moved to Europe in 1982 to further his education, though his greatest passion was soccer.

    While earning a law degree at the University of Rome, Okwaraji played for the Italian club A.S. Roma. Fluent in several languages, he bounced from club to club, ending up at Germany’s SSV-Ulm 1846 team where he emerged as a standout player. Still, he wanted nothing more than to represent his homeland.

    Okwaraji returned home to compete for a spot on the Nigerian “Green Eagles” team that played in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. With his energetic style of play and his love for his homeland, he soon became a fan favorite. Okwaraji was unhappy to learn that his German club was charging the Nigerian Football Association for lost revenues while he played for Nigeria. Reminding the team that he was a lawyer, Okwaraji passionately wrote “I am going to represent my country in the World Cup in Italy whether you like it or not.”

    Unfortunately, his dream of playing in the World Cup for Nigeria did not come to fruition. On August 12, 1989, with just fifteen minutes left in a tough World Cup qualifying match against Angola, Okwarji’s life was tragically cut short when he fell down on the field at the National Stadium in Lagos and could not be revived.

    Today, a statue of Okwaraji stands in front of that same National Stadium and reads: In memory of an illustrious and patriotic Nigerian sportsman.

  8. #12858
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    23 May 2022

    Maria Konopnicka's 180th birthday






    Maria Konopnicka fought for women’s rights and Polish Independence with her pen. Today’s Doodle celebrates the acclaimed poet, author and activist’s 180th Birthday.

    Konopnicka was born on May 23rd, 1842 in Suwalki, Poland. When she was 12, her mother passed away, leaving her strict and patriotic father to raise three little girls. As a self-taught writer that craved innovative ideas, Konopnicka avidly read classic and contemporary literature. She was especially taken by the Polish Positivist writers, and their progressive ideals would later influence her work.

    In 1870, she made her debut as a poet and by 1876 her poems were being published in national journals, including her collection “In the Mountains,” which appeared in the well-respected Tygodnik Ilustrowany [Illustrated Weekly]. A positive review by Nobel Prize laureate Henryk Sienkiewicz encouraged Konopnicka to keep writing.

    In 1877, Konopnicka moved to Warsaw with her children to be in the thick of Polish literary and intellectual life. She published four controversial, yet acclaimed volumes of poetry focusing on patriotism and providing a voice to the lower class over the next 15 years. Between 1884 and 1887, Konopnicka defied conservative criticism and censors while serving as an editor for the democratic women’s magazine Świt.

    Konopnicka never stopped challenging herself and also authored short stories, children’s books and translated French and German poetry into Polish. Her short stories, including "Nasza szkapa" [Our Jade] and "Dym" [Smoke], are considered to be among the best in Polish literature. In 1901, she took a break from her writing to help organize protests against the repressive measures taken by the Prussian government, which forced Polish children to speak in German at school. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of her literary and social work, Konopnicka was offered a house in Zarnowiec as a gift from the Polish nation.

    In 1973, the Maria Konopnicka Museum in Suwalki opened to memorialize her accomplishments. Millions of copies of her books have been printed and reprinted throughout Poland.

    Happy Birthday, Maria Konopnicka.

  9. #12859
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    23 May 2013

    140th Anniversary of the RCMP




    The Royal Canadian Mounted Police, commonly known in English as the Mounties is the federal and national police service of Canada. As police services are the constitutional responsibility of provinces and territories of Canada, the RCMP's primary responsibility is the enforcement of federal criminal law, and sworn members of the RCMP have jurisdiction as a peace officer in all provinces and territories of Canada. However, the service also provides police services under contract to eight of Canada's provinces [all except Ontario and Quebec], all three of Canada's territories, more than 150 municipalities, and 600 Indigenous communities. In addition to enforcing federal legislation and delivering local police services under contract, the RCMP is responsible for border integrity.

  10. #12860
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    23 August 2021

    Aimé Painé's 78th birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 78th birthday of Argentinian activist and singer Aimé Painé, a member of the Mapuche nation who devoted her life to preserving the traditional music of her community.

    On this day in 1943, Aimé Painé was born in Ingeniero Luis A. Huergo, Argentina as Olga Elisa, a name she had to adopt due to a law that barred the use of Indigenous names. After being separated from her family at the age of three, Painé’s adoptive parents recognized her unique vocal talent and enrolled her in music school. She joined the National Polyphonic Choir in Buenos Aires in her late 20s. During one of the group's international recitals, she learned that Argentina was among the only nations in attendance that didn’t perform Indigenous music. This denial of native heritage prompted Painé to embark on a journey to southern Argentina to reconnect with her Indigenous roots.

    Her quest led to a reunion with her biological, Mapuche father who inspired Painé to carry on their ancestral heritage through music. She reinterpreted ancient Mapuche songs in the native language of Mapudungun while playing traditional instruments, such as the cultrun and the cascahuillas. As one of the first musicians to popularize Mapuche music, Painé traveled across Argentina dressed in traditional Mapuche garb through the 1980s, singing stories of her people and denouncing their marginalization.

    In 1987, Painé represented the Mapuche people at a United Nations conference, where she brought global awareness to her community’s struggle for equal rights. Today, Painé's legacy is honored each year on September 10 as the “Day of Mapuche Culture” in Argentina.

    Happy birthday, Aimé Painé and thank you for safeguarding Mapuche musical traditions!

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    13 January 2018

    5th African Nations Championship




    Can you feel the excitement in the air? Once again, the African Nations Championship is upon us!

    Today we’re celebrating the start of the 5th African Nations Championship, a football tournament drawing in teams from across Africa to compete for the coveted title. The first tournament was held in Ivory Coast in 2009, designed to showcase the football talent amongst the best African national teams. The Confederation of African Football organizes the competition every two years and only allows footballers playing for their country’s domestic team to participate. As a result, the best African talent will be on display - you won’t want to miss it!

    All the action is taking place in Morocco as the first games of the 2018 tournament kick off today. Sixteen teams will descend upon various stadiums across Morocco, but only one will be crowned the champion, during the final game on February 4, played in Casablanca.

    Today’s doodle features players wearing each of the flags of the countries represented. They’re practicing their skills, just like each of the African Nations have done all year.

    Good luck to all the players [and fans!] across Africa!

  12. #12862
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    5 Dec 2017

    Veronika Dudarova’s 101st Birthday




    In today’s Doodle, Google-hued lights shine on a group of musicians led by Veronika Dudarova, the first Russian woman to conduct an orchestra.

    Born in 1916, Dudarova spent her formative years studying piano and musicology in the company of some of Russia’s most renowned musical talents. In 1947, she graduated from the Moscow Conservatory, joining the Moscow State Symphony Orchestra as a junior conductor. She spent 13 years in that role before taking over as principal conductor in 1960. In 1991, Dudarova formed the Symphony Orchestra of Russia, which she led until 2003.

    One of the very few female conductors in the world, Dudarova holds the Guinness World Record as the only woman to lead a major symphony orchestra for more than 50 years. During her career, she won the State Russian Music Award, was named the People’s Artist of the USSR, and even had a minor planet named after her.

    On what would’ve been Dudarova’s 101st birthday, we honor the conductor’s dramatic style as she leads the Google letters in a passionate, homepage-worthy performance.

  13. #12863
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    26 November 2020

    Celebrating Saloma








    Today’s Doodle celebrates the beloved Singaporean-Malaysian actor, singer, and fashion icon best known as Saloma. A trend-setter of Malaysian entertainment from the late ‘50s through the early ‘80s, Saloma recorded over 500 songs, and through her charismatic film work she paved the way for future generations of female actors in her country. On this day in 1978, she made history when she was awarded Malaysia’s first Biduanita Negara [National Songbird] by the Malaysian government of the time.

    Saloma was born Salmah Ismail in Singapore on January 22, 1932, and first started to explore her skills as a vocalist at just seven years old. By her teenage years, she began to sing professionally, starting her music career through performances at nightclubs and weddings.

    Once Saloma transitioned to acting by the mid ‘50s, she quickly became a celebrity figure. In 1961, she married fellow multi-hyphenate entertainment icon P. Ramlee, and over the years that followed, the legendary power couple forever altered Malaysian entertainment through music and film. Sporting her signature coiffed hairdo and inimitable clothing [much of which she sewed herself], Saloma starred in movies throughout the ‘60s and released albums for the rest of her life.

    Thank you, Saloma, for using your artistic gifts to inspire women in Malaysia and beyond to be themselves.

  14. #12864
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    24 Nov 2020

    Celebrating Mariachi







    Today’s video Doodle celebrates a quintessential element of Mexico’s rich cultural heritage: the musical genre of Mariachi. Mariachi is typically characterized by a small group of musicians dressed in traditional clothing who perform a wide repertoire of Mexican songs on mostly stringed instruments [the term Mariachi can refer to either the music or the musicians themselves]. During a session held the week of November 22, 2011 UNESCO inscribed Mariachi on its Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

    The Mariachi tradition was born in west-central Mexico around the turn of the 19th century, though its exact origins remain unknown. At first, the genre was strictly instrumental, composed of the sounds of stringed instruments, and eventually vocals and the trumpet were added to the mix. In modern times, Mariachi music has been combined with elements of diverse genres from jazz to reggae. Singers often add in their best grito to express the emotion of the vibrant music! No matter the variation, Mariachi remains a strong representation of Mexican history and culture.

    Today’s video Doodle features a Mariachi serenade of the classic song, Cielito Lindo. More than just music, Cielito Lindo [which roughly translates from Spanish as “lovely sweet one”] is a symbol of Mexican pride and community.The Mariachi band is depicted playing the staple instruments of the musical genre—including the guitarrón [a six-string bass], vihuela [a five-string guitar], violin, trumpet, and harp—and wearing traditional trajes de charro [charro suits].

    ¡Que viva el Mariachi!
    Last edited by 9A; 09-18-2022 at 07:58 AM.

  15. #12865
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    13 January 2017

    Flora Nwapa’s 86th Birthday




    Flora Nwapa, Nigeria's first published female novelist and Africa's first internationally-acclaimed English-language female writer, held the spotlight for nearly her entire adult life. She was not only an accomplished author, but a publisher, public servant, and activist.

    From Nwapa's first novel, Efuru, published in 1966, to the establishment of her publishing company, Tana Press, Nwapa demonstrated an unwavering commitment to advancing and highlighting the women of Nigeria. Additionally, she used her books, and the books she published, to introduce Nigeria’s rich culture to a global audience.

    Nwapa served by day in the Nigerian government, becoming the first female Minister of Health and Social Welfare for Nigeria’s former East Central State in 1970. During that time, she worked to reunite children and their parents who were divided as a result of the Biafran War. Afterwards, she became Minister of Lands, Survey, and Urban Development, a position she held until 1974.

    Today’s Doodle pays homage to Nwapa, known as the “mother of modern African literature,” on what would be her 86th birthday.

  16. #12866
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    4 Sept 2019

    50th Anniversary of Mexico City Metro




    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 50th anniversary of one of the world’s great public transportation systems, the Mexico City Metro. On this day in 1969, the first subway line of the Sistema de Transporte Colectivo began running east and west from Zaragoza to Chapultepec.

    Today the Metro’s 12 lines correspond with 12 different colors, as shown in today’s Doodle artwork, with connections to light railways in the south and cable cars in the north, crisscrossing the most populous metropolitan area in the Western Hemisphere and transporting some 5 million passengers every day.

    When the idea for the Metro was first proposed in the 1950s, Mexico City’s population was much smaller than it is today, but the bus and tramway system was severely strained. To address the issue, the city government approved the Metro construction plan in 1967, with the 1968 Olympics just around the corner.

    It was no small challenge for engineer Bernardo Quintana to tunnel underneath a mega city built over a lake, in an area with a history of seismological activity as well as archaeological riches. Metro construction crews have unearthed some remarkable finds, including an 11,000-year-old mammoth skull, which is now on display at the Talismán station; a circular pyramid dedicated to Ehécatl, the Aztec God of wind, around which the Pino Suárez station was built; and in 2010, a 500-year-old Aztec gravesite.

    Each of the 195 Metro stops has its own color and symbol, designed to make the system easy to navigate. La Raza station boasts a 600-meter-long [1969-feet-long] science museum, the Túnel de la Ciencia, stimulating the minds of passengers as they walk between lines 3 and 5. Other stations are designed to resemble the Art Nouveau entrances to the Paris Metro. Rubber wheels on many lines keep noise to a minimum, and the fare to ride can be as low as 5 pesos.

  17. #12867
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    7 Sept 2019

    Celebrating Marcelle Ferron



    “My aim has always been modest. I wanted to transform the arranged marriage [of art and architecture] into a love match.” ​—Marcelle Ferron

    Today’s Doodle celebrates the life and work of the renowned Canadian painter, sculptor, and glassmaker, whose famous installation in Montreal’s Vendôme station was unveiled on this day in 1981. Marcelle Ferron’s striking design combined colorful stained glass with a spiraling stainless steel sculpture, a unique style that inspired the Doodle’s art.

    Born in 1924, Ferron studied at the École des beaux-arts de Québec, but left upon realizing she was unable to find answers to her questions about modern art. Upon meeting Québec abstract painter Paul-Émile Borduas, she joined his Automatiste group and became one of the youngest artists to sign their 1948 manifesto Refus global. Ferron went on to spend 13 years painting in Paris, exhibiting her work at the 1961 São Paulo Biennial in Brazil, where she won a silver medal.

    Her meeting with glassmaker Michel Blum sparked an interest in glass as an art medium. Over time, she devised her own methods, building “walls of light” connected by invisible joints that allowed her to create large planes of color. These innovative techniques can be seen in her mural for Expo 67 and public commissions in the Champ-de-Mars train station, Sainte-Justine Hospital, and the Granby courthouse.

    Throughout her 50-year career, Ferron became one of Canada’s most important contemporary artists and was made a Knight of the National Order of Québec in 1985, then promoted to Grand Officer in 2000. This restless visionary’s achievements blazed a trail for women aspiring to make a mark in what was a traditionally male-dominated space.

  18. #12868
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    7 September 2017

    Sir John Cornforth’s 100th Birthday


    Today's Doodle celebrates chemist Sir John Warcup Cornforth, born in Sydney on this date in 1917. During childhood, Cornforth began to lose his hearing, and he was completely deaf by the age of 20. Unable to hear the lectures in his classes at the University of Sydney, he devoured chemistry textbooks on his own.

    One fateful day at university, Cornforth met fellow chemist Rita Harradence. She had broken a flask in the lab and asked Cornforth — an accomplished glassblower — to repair it. Thus began a long professional and romantic partnership. In 1939, Cornforth and Harradence both won scholarships to study at Oxford, and they married two years later. Together they wrote more than 40 scientific papers. [Now that's chemistry!]

    At Oxford, Conforth joined the team that made great strides in the study of penicillin. He then returned to his earlier research on the three-dimensional structure ["stereochemistry"] of various chemical reactions. In 1975, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for this work. Cornforth and co-laureate Vladimir Prelog studied the enzymes that activate changes in organic compounds. Their conclusions opened the door to many discoveries, including the development of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

    When the Nobel Prize was announced, the press release admitted, "This subject is difficult to explain to the layman." But it was already clear that millions of people would benefit from Cornforth's lifelong curiosity about the workings and wonder of the natural world.

  19. #12869
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    7 September 2016

    Paralympics 2016




    What started as a small gathering of British WWII veterans in 1948 has bloomed into the world’s largest sporting event for athletes with physical disabilities, drawing 4,500 athletes from 176 countries worldwide.

    Today’s Doodle celebrates the opening of the 2016 Summer Paralympics and highlights the incredible feats of athleticism the participants will demonstrate in Rio. They’ll go for gold during a year of firsts: Rio, the first Latin American city to host the Paralympics, will debut canoeing and paratriathlon among the more than 500 existing events.

    Tune in to cheer your favorite Paralympians on through September 18 when the Games wrap up.

  20. #12870
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    12 Sept 2016

    Takizo Iwasaki’s 121st birthday


    Most of us are familiar with the wax and plastic replica foods that help you decide what to order at a restaurant, but did you know that the practice dates back to the 1920s?

    Takizo Iwasaki re-invented a practice that had been around for over a decade, of creating sampuru [or samples] of food served by restaurants. He started with a perfectly 'cooked' omelet made of wax. Reportedly, upon showing it to his wife, she couldn't even tell the difference between the sampuru and the real thing! The omelet was once open for public viewing in his home prefecture of Gifu, where most of the world's replica food is still made.

    Although replica foods are now more often made of plastic than wax, the practice is still done by hand and rarely mass-produced. This is to maintain the quality of the sampuru and the unique dishes that each restaurant requests.

    Today's doodle celebrates Takizo Iwasaki on what would be his 121st birthday, with an homage to that original omelet that changed the landscape of sampuru forever.

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    12 September 2022

    Gabriela Brimmer's 75th birthday



    Today’s Doodle celebrates Mexican-Jewish writer and disability rights activist Gabriela Brimmer on what would have been her 75th birthday. Brimmer made impactful contributions to books and films that authentically portrayed her experience as a person with cerebral palsy, ultimately creating more opportunities for those in the disabled community.


    Brimmer was born in Mexico City in 1947 to parents who escaped Nazi Austria. Soon after, her parents learned she had severe cerebral palsy, a muscular disorder that can affect a person's movement, muscle tone and posture. Brimmer’scaregivers taught her to communicate through written words and poetry, as she was nonverbal.

    Her left leg and foot, the only part of her body she could move, became her means of communication with the world. As depicted in today’s artwork, she wrote beautiful passages by using a typewriter that she operated with the big toe on her left foot.

    Brimmer later teamed up with Mexican novelists and journalists to write three bestselling books that accurately depicted her life. She also worked with producers to repurpose her autobiography into the movie Gaby, a True Story [1987], which won Golden Globes and Oscar nominations.

    Brimmer went on to found the Association for the Rights of People with Motor Disabilities and participated in many other organizations that advocated for disability rights and accessibility.

    In 2016, the Gaby Brimmer National Center for Rehabilitation and Educational Integration was created in her honor.

    Happy birthday, Gabriela Brimmer!

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    12 September 2011

    Korean Thanksgiving 2011




    Chuseok or Hangawi which literally means “Autumn eve”, is a three-day Korean harvest festival celebrated in Korea. It's also known as Korean Thanksgiving.

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    12 September 2014

    Ernesto Carneiro Ribeiro's 175th Birthday




    Fellow grammarians, today you meet your hero on our homepage in Brazil. We’re celebrating the 175th birthday of linguist, educator and physician Ernesto Carneiro Ribeiro, who worked to revise Brazil’s official grammar code to include conversational speech.

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    12 September 2018

    Caio Fernando Abreu’s 70th Birthday




    Born on this day in 1948 in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, Caio Fernando Abreu is one of his country’s most celebrated contemporary writers, whose work explored the LGBTQ+ experience and sensitive themes such as loneliness, alienation, and AIDS.

    Abreu studied dramatic arts in college and worked as an editor and pop culture journalist before focusing on writing stories, novels, and plays. In 1975 he won honorable mention in a national fiction contest, but he is best known for his collection of stories Os dragões não conhecem o paraíso, which translates from Portuguese as “Dragons do not know the paradise.” First published in 1987, it was eventually translated into French and English and retitled simply ‘Dragons...’

    I’ve got a dragon living with me.

    No, it’s not true.

    I haven’t really got a dragon. And even if I did have, he wouldn’t live with me.

    These enigmatic and evocative lines from ‘Dragons…’ reflect the central theme of this work. In Abreu’s fiction “Dragons” represent individuals living at the margins of society—drag queens, gay teens, bisexual men, and a range of others —unknowable, lonely, powerful, untamable, invisible, and perceived by the mainstream as dangerous. Today’s Doodle pays tribute to Abreu’s courageous and compassionate spirit, and his insightful and emotionally charged body of work.

    Like many Brazilian artists and writers at the time he ran afoul of the DOPS, the "Department for Political and Social Order," a government agency that maintained files on anyone considered a potential enemy of the state. His novel Onde Andara Dulce Veiga [Whatever Happened to Dulce Veiga?] won the Best Novel award in 2000 from the São Paulo Association of Art Critics and he won won three Jabuti Prizes, Brazil’s most prestigious literary honor. Two of Abreu's short stories were adapted into films and plays, and his novel Onde Andará Dulce Veiga became a 2008 feature film, directed by his friend Guilherme de Almeida Prado.

    Happy Birthday Caio Fernando Abreu!

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    29 November 2022

    2022 World Cup [Nov 29]




    The 2022 FIFA World Cup is an international association football tournament contested by the men's national teams of FIFA's member associations. The 22nd FIFA World Cup, it is taking place in Qatar from 20 November to 18 December 2022. This is the first World Cup to be held in the Arab world, and the second held entirely in Asia after the 2002 tournament in South Korea and Japan. At an estimated cost of over $220 billion, it is the most expensive World Cup ever held. France are the defending champions, having defeated Croatia 4–2 in the 2018 final.

    The choice to host the World Cup in Qatar has been the source of controversy. Criticism focused on Qatar's poor human-rights record, particularly their treatment of migrant workers, women, and position on LGBT rights, leading to allegations of sportswashing. Qatar's stance on the rights of LGBT people is common in various other Muslim-majority countries; furthermore, all kinds of sex outside marriage are illegal in Qatar. Others have cited Qatar's intense climate and lack of a strong football culture, as well as evidence of bribery for hosting rights and wider FIFA corruption.
    Last edited by 9A; 11-29-2022 at 06:58 AM.

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    29 November 2015

    42nd Anniversary of the official recognition of the letter ё


    Google says:

    The diaeresis [the two dots] signifies that the underlying “e” is pronounced as /ɛ/ [[as “e” in “bet”, i.e. the open e), no matter what comes around it, and is used in groups of vowels that would otherwise be pronounced differently.

    It is not believe to be used in English language.

    According to Wikipedia:

    Ye, Je, or Ie [Е е; italics: Е е] is a letter of the Cyrillic script. In some languages this letter is called E. It looks like another version of E [Cyrillic].

    It commonly represents the vowel [e] or [ɛ], like the pronunciation of ⟨e⟩ in "yes".
    Last edited by 9A; 11-29-2022 at 07:19 AM.

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    29 November 2017

    Christian Doppler’s 214th Birthday




    When a fire engine approaches, the siren gets louder as it comes closer, taxing your eardrums as it whizzes past, and fades into the distance. What causes this difference in volume?

    The answer was proposed by Austrian mathematician and physicist Christian Doppler in 1842 in a phenomenon since documented as the Doppler Effect, a concept that applies to both sound and light, in addition to other phenomena.

    Simply put, sound is generated in ‘waves.’ As the source of such waves moves closer, the waves themselves take less time to reach you. They hit you with increasing frequency, making the sound more intense. As the source moves away, the waves start to spread out, and the sound becomes weaker.

    The Doppler effect also explains why stars in the sky appear to be of different colors. As a star approaches the earth, wavelengths compress and the star appears to be bluer in color. If the converse happens and a star is moving away from us, it appears redder.

    Though the Doppler Effect is his most famous contribution to scientific literature, Christian Doppler authored over fifty works in mathematics, physics, and astronomy over the course of a twenty year teaching career that spanned modern day Austria, the Czech Republic, and Hungary.

    Today’s Doodle by guest artist Max Löffler celebrates Christian Doppler’s 214th birthday. It shows Doppler in Salzburg, his native city, holding an airplane as it creates a Doppler effect.

    Alles Gute zum Geburtstag, Herr Doppler!

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    29 November 2018

    Celebrating 400º of Murillo






    Bartolomé Esteban Murillo painted historical and religious scenes, portraits, and still lifes in oil and fresco during the golden era of Spanish art. Known for his dramatic lighting, radiant color palette, and versatility, Murillo brought to life a wide range of subjects, from the grandeur of his Immaculate Conception to the casual grace of Two Women at a Window.

    Although his exact birthdate is unknown, he was baptized on New Year’s Day 1618 in Seville’s Church of St. Mary Magdalen and lived in Seville most of his life. Studying with the accomplished painter Juan del Castillo, a relative on his mother’s side of the family, Murillo would eventually surpass his master and be considered the head of what became known as the “Sevillian School” of the Baroque era.

    Renowned for his Independent spirit, Murillo cultivated his own style of painting, incorporating Flemish and Venetian influences and evolving throughout his career. During two extended trips to Madrid, he was introduced to Diego Velázquez and exposed to works by Venetian and Flemish masters, which deeply influenced his own work. In turn, Murillo’s paintings would go on to influence such future masters as Thomas Gainsborough and Jean-Baptiste Greuze.

    In honor of his 400th anniversary, a series of major exhibitions celebrating Murillo’s work is opening at Seville’s Museum of Fine Arts, bringing home the artist’s work from renowned collections all over the world. Guided tours, concerts, and other cultural activities combine to make this the “Year of Murillo.”

    Happy Anniversary, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo!
    Last edited by 9A; 11-29-2022 at 07:28 AM.

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    29 November 2019

    María Ylagan Orosa's 126th Birthday



    Today’s Doodle honors Filipino food scientist, war hero, and humanitarian María Ylagan Orosa, credited with over 700 recipes—including the iconic local condiment banana ketchup—on what would have been her 126th birthday.

    Born in the municipality of Taal within the Batangas province, Orosa went on to become an outstanding student, winning a partial government scholarship in 1916 to attend the University of Seattle. While living in a YMCA and working odd jobs, Orosa completed her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in pharmaceutical chemistry, as well as an additional degree in food chemistry.

    Orosa was then offered a position as an assistant chemist for the State of Washington before returning to the Philippines in 1922 to focus on addressing the problem of malnutrition in her homeland.

    Orosa’s knowledge of chemistry led to numerous culinary innovations. For instance, by fitting a traditional earthenware pot with two sheets of metal, she invented the Palayok Oven, providing remote villages lacking access to electricity with a more effective means of cooking over an open fire.

    Although adobo and lumpia are synonymous with Filipino cuisine, Orosa’s banana ketchup is not far behind. Using mashed bananas as a base instead of tomatoes, she made the sauce a long-lasting hit. Two other inventions made her a war hero: Soyalac [a nutrient rich drink derived from soya beans] and Darak [rice cookies packed with vitamin B-1, which could also prevent beriberi disease] saved countless lives during World War II.

    In recognition of Orosa's contributions to Filipino society, the National Historical Institute installed a marker in her honor at the Bureau of Plant Industry in Manila in 1983.

    Happy birthday, María Ylagan Orosa!
    Last edited by 9A; 11-29-2022 at 07:46 AM.

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    Nov 28, 2019

    Michel Berger's 72nd Birthday






    Today’s animated video Doodle, made in collaboration with Lyon-based animation studio Souviens Ten-Zan [STZ], celebrates French singer-songwriter Michel Berger on his 72nd birthday. Working with some of the biggest names of French music, Berger became a French pop music staple. The song featured in today’s Doodle, “Celui qui chante,” was composed and performed by Berger and spreads a message of positivity and acceptance that still resonates today.

    Berger was trained in classical piano at an early age. A gifted pianist like his mother, Berger’s musical interest went beyond those of the symphonies he practiced daily, taking inspiration from artists like Ray Charles to explore varied sounds and arrangements.

    French popular music of the 1960s was dominated by Yé-Yé artists. Inspired by American rock music of the same era, jazz, and French chanson, to name a few, Yé-Yé music became synonymous with youth culture and paved the way for Berger to enter the music industry.

    A record label’s open casting call for young musicians produced Berger’s first commercial success as a singer with the release of his second single, “Tu n'y crois pas,” featured on the radio before he graduated high school.

    By the mid-1970s, Berger began working with his future wife, singer France Gall. The former Eurovision winner and Yé-Yé artist became one of France’s highest-selling female singers. The pair became household names, producing a number of hit albums together, while Berger continued producing his own popular records in parallel. Berger’s reputation as a songwriter led to a notable collaboration with Elton John. Together, the duo produced “Donner pour Donner,” with Gall and John on vocals.

    Berger’s music gained rapid popularity for its heartfelt lyrics, making it a mainstay in the French pop scene. Later in his career, he was inspired to help those in need through his participation in the Song for Ethiopia benefit concert, becoming an advocate for children’s philanthropy causes.

    Merci et bon anniversaire, Michel Berger!

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    September 1, 2020

    Celebrating Dr. Harold Moody




    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Dublin-based guest artist Charlot Kristensen, celebrates Jamaican-born British doctor, racial equality campaigner, and founder of the U.K.'s first civil rights movement Dr. Harold Moody. On this day in 1904, Dr. Moody arrived in the U.K. from Jamaica to pursue his medical studies at King’s College London. Alongside his medical work, he dedicated his life to campaigning for racial equality and advocating against discrimination.

    Harold Arundel Moody was born on October 8, 1882, in the Jamaican capital of Kingston. He received early exposure to the medical field while in secondary school through his work for his father’s pharmaceutical business. Determined to become a doctor, he left Jamaica in 1904 to study medicine in London.

    Dr. Moody soon came face-to-face with rampant racism in Edwardian London. Even though he qualified to practice medicine, finished top of his class, and won numerous academic prizes, he was repeatedly refused work due to the color bar system that denied people opportunities based on race. Instead, he opened his own private medical practice in Peckham, South East London—the neighborhood that inspired the design of the buildings situated below Dr. Moody in today’s Doodle. The children depicted represent the countless impoverished youth Dr. Moody would treat free of charge, in a time before the U.K. had a National Health Service. In doing so, Dr. Moody earned a reputation as a compassionate humanitarian and philanthropist who would always help those in need.

    Dr. Moody’s determination to improve the lives of those around him wasn’t limited to his medical practice—he simultaneously focused his attention on combating racial injustice as well. He founded the League of Coloured Peoples in 1931 with the mission to fight for racial equality both in the U.K. and around the world. The group pushed for change, at a government level, to combat discrimination in its many forms.

    Thank you, Dr. Moody, for paving the way towards a more equal future.

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    June 26, 2018

    World Cup 2018 - Day 13



    The 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia is underway! Over the next month, players from the men's national teams of 32 countries will compete for top rank across 12 venues in 11 cities around the country. With a total of 64 matches [and plenty of GOOOALS!], the games will culminate at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow on July 15.

    This year's Doodle series celebrates the rich cultures and talent of all 32 participating countries by featuring guest artists hailing from each nation! Tune in to catch all 32 Doodles throughout the games, each illustrating the artist's interpretation of "What ⚽ looks like in my country."

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    October 6, 2021

    Margaret Fulton's 97th Birthday





    In 1970s Australian kitchens, no other cookbooks were more common than those authored by beloved Scottish-born Australian food writer and journalist Margaret Fulton. Today’s Doodle celebrates Fulton’s 97th birthday and her legacy of spicing up the Australian palate with international cuisine.

    Born on this day in 1924 in Nairn, Scotland, Margaret Fulton emigrated to New South Wales at three years old. At 18, Fulton moved to Sydney in the hope of becoming a dress designer, but after hearing a prediction that the food industry would boom in post-war Australia, she instead pursued a career in cookery. In 1947, Fulton took a position as a cooking teacher for a utility company, where she found her passion for developing easy-to-follow recipes while teaching a class for visually impaired home cooks.

    Fulton refined her recipes in the decades that followed while working as a pressure cooker salesperson, advertising executive, and food journalist. In 1968, she published the first of 25 cookbooks titled “The Margaret Fulton Cookbook” which has sold over 1.5 million copies.

    Although international fare was already the standard in countless kitchens around the continent, the bulk of the Anglo-Australian populace had retained a relatively simple culinary tradition for decades. Thanks to innovators such as Fulton who were inspired by these cooking traditions, many Australian households broke convention to embrace new ways to feed their families—a powerful cultural phenomenon that contributed to the country’s modern status as a culinary melting pot.

    Happy birthday, Margaret Fulton—here’s to your gastronomical impact on the world of food!

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    September 23, 2016

    358th Anniversary of Tea in the UK





    Tea drinking is a thoroughly British pastime, whether it’s a mug of steaming builder’s tea or a delicate cup and saucer served with cucumber sandwiches. It’s not known when the first cuppa was enjoyed in the UK, but we do know that the first advert for tea in England appeared on this date in a publication from 1658 describing it simply as a “China Drink.” A couple of years later, English Naval Administrator Samuel Pepys wrote about drinking tea in his diary entry from 1660.

    Chinese tea was reportedly drunk by Europeans as early as the 16th century, a trend spearheaded by Dutch and Portuguese traders. British coffee shops were selling tea in the 17th century, though drinking it was considered an expensive, upper-class privilege. By the 19th century, The East India Company was using fast ships called tea clippers to transport leaves from India and China to England’s docks. The Cutty Sark is the only surviving clipper of its kind and can still be visited in Greenwich.

    As tea became more readily available, dedicated tea shops began popping up throughout the UK, becoming favorite spots for daytime socialising. Tea was well on its way to becoming a British tradition.

    As today’s animated Doodle illustrates, tea cups come in all shapes, colors, and sizes. Whatever your favorite vessel may be, we hope you enjoy a cuppa or two of this enduring drink today.

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    30 Apr 2016

    Claude Shannon’s 100th birthday







    It’s impossible to overstate the legacy of Claude Shannon. The paper he wrote for his master’s thesis is the foundation of electronic digital computing. As a cryptographer for the U.S. Government during WWII, he developed the first unbreakable cipher. For fun, he tinkered with electronic switches, and one of his inventions--an electromechanic mouse he called Theseus--could teach itself to navigate a maze. If you’re thinking, “that sounds a lot like artificial intelligence,” you’re right. He regularly brushed shoulders with Einstein and Alan Turing, and his work in electronic communications and signal processing--the stuff that earned him the moniker “the father of information theory”--led to revolutionary changes in the storage and transmission of data.

    Notwithstanding this staggering list of achievements in mathematics and engineering, Shannon managed to avoid one of the trappings of genius: taking oneself too seriously. A world-class prankster and juggler, he was often spotted in the halls of Bell Labs on a unicycle, and invented such devices as the rocket-powered frisbee and flame-throwing trumpet.

  36. #12886
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    October 10, 2011

    Fridtjof Nansen's 150th Birthday






    Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen [Norwegian: 10 October 1861 – 13 May 1930] was a Norwegian polymath and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. He gained prominence at various points in his life as an explorer, scientist, diplomat and humanitarian. He led the team that made the first crossing of the Greenland interior in 1888, traversing the island on cross-country skis. He won international fame after reaching a record northern latitude of 86°14′ during his Fram expedition of 1893—1896. Although he retired from exploration after his return to Norway, his techniques of polar travel and his innovations in equipment and clothing influenced a generation of subsequent Arctic and Antarctic expeditions.

    In the final decade of his life, Nansen devoted himself primarily to the League of Nations, following his appointment in 1921 as the League's High Commissioner for Refugees. In 1922 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work on behalf of the displaced victims of World War I and related conflicts. Among the initiatives he introduced was the "Nansen passport" for stateless persons, a certificate that used to be recognized by more than 50 countries. He worked on behalf of refugees until his sudden death in 1930, after which the League established the Nansen International Office for Refugees to ensure that his work continued. This office received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1938. His name is commemorated in numerous geographical features, particularly in the polar regions.
    Last edited by 9A; 11-30-2022 at 07:03 AM.

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    November 18, 2017

    Pedro Infante’s 100th Birthday



    What’s in a name? If nicknames count, the answers are infinite for beloved Mexican singer and actor Pedro Infante. Often compared to Frank Sinatra, Humphrey Bogart, and Elvis Presley, the artist’s monikers — from "El Rey de Rancheras" to "El ídolo de Guamúchil" to "El Inmortal" — illustrate his myriad talents and enduring charm.

    Born in 1917 in the fishing town of Mazatlán, Infante apprenticed to a carpenter and learned music from his father. Though deft at many instruments [he even crafted his own guitar], his voice was his most exceptional talent. As part of his father’s band, “La Rabia” in his teenage days, Infante experimented with the style that made him most famous. Mixing feeling with technique, his soulful croon forever changed the way the mariachi was sung and he helped popularize the genre around the world.

    But singing was just the first act in Infante’s story. In 1943 he starred in "La Feria de las Flores," and also created his first musical record, "El Soldado Raso." This marked the beginning of a 14 year career in which Infante acted in nearly 60 films and recorded 366 songs, becoming one of the most prominent and loved figures in "La época de Oro del Cine Mexicano" [the Golden Era of Mexican cinema].

    As today’s Doodle shows, Infante’s passions went beyond stage and screen, though they often appeared intertwined. An avid boxer off-camera, Infante stepped into the ring for 1953’s "Pepe El Toro," one of his most iconic roles. In "A Toda Máquina," Infante played the part of a motorcycle cop, dignifying the profession and immortalizing high-speed “acrobacias” — a sequence of dizzying, two-wheeled pirouettes that are still performed in many of Mexico’s parades and civil events today.

    Infante was posthumously awarded a Silver Bear for Best Actor at the 7th Berlin International Film Festival for his performance in "Tizoc," his last film. Today we celebrate what would have been the artist’s 100th birthday with scenes illustrating the vibrant parallels between his life and work — all beginning with a classic Infante pose.

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    May 13, 2019

    60th Anniversary of Torres del Paine National Park





    Described by an early visitor as "one of the most ... spectacular sights that human imagination can conceive," Torres del Paine became a national park on this day in 1959. Initially named Lago Grey, the park was expanded and renamed in 1970. Today’s Doodle celebrates the splendor of this natural treasure situated near the Andes mountains at the southernmost tip of Chile.

    First settled by the ancient Aonikenk people, Parque Nacional Torres del Paine takes its name from the Paine Massif mountain range and three granite torres or towers that rise some 2000 meters above the Patagonian steppe.

    The rugged beauty of the land—forests, lakes, rivers, waterfalls, and an enormous blue glacier—attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors each year to enjoy camping, hiking, cycling, kayaking, and boating. Since the 15th century, the area has also been home to the nomadic Kaweskar people who coexist with wild pumas, condors, and llama-like creatures known as guanacos.

    The national park was added to UNESCO’s Biosphere Reserve system in 1978 and even received 5 million votes to be elected the “Eighth Wonder of the World” in 2013.

  39. #12889
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    May 13, 2016

    Daeng Soetigna's 108th Birthday






    Music can instantly transport a listener to a unique place and time. The melodic sounds of the angklung are no exception.

    One rap of the hand on this Indonesian bamboo instrument, and we’re transported to the tranquil islands of Southeast Asia. For this, we can thank Daeng Soetigna, whose novel seven-note diatonic angklung brought the tones of Indonesia to an international audience. While the oldest known angklung dates back to the 17th century, it was Soetigna’s modifications in 1938 that lifted it out of obscurity and into orchestras, concerts, and classrooms around the world.

    We celebrate Soetigna’s ingenuity, and contribution to modern musical education with this bamboo-themed doodle by Lydia Nichols.

  40. #12890
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    Apr 29, 2016

    48th Anniversary of first TV broadcasting of Les Shadoks







    Nearly half a century later, France still fondly recalls Les Shadoks. With absurd maxims like “every advantage has its disadvantage, and vice versa," the bird-like creatures and their hilariously inane brand of logic struck a chord with French culture when they hit the screen in 1968.

    Jacques Rouxel’s experimental and minimalist cartoon even proved divisive, as some saw nonsense where others found originality, comic genius, and important commentary on futility and French life. Hélène Leroux, who animated today’s Shadoks, used the occasion to bring her favorite Shadok’s proverbs to life. She writes:

    “I particularly enjoyed the simplicity of the characters: Simple, rounded birds with long, thin legs, always going on nonsense adventures. In their daily lives, the Shadoks always refer to specific mottos they made up that parody real-life human principles: ‘If there are no solutions, then there are no problems,’ or, ‘to reduce the number of unhappy people, always beat up the same individuals,’ and of course, ‘I pump therefore I am.’ Like operators on a handcar that goes nowhere, Les Shadoks are famous for their endless and useless pumping. I thought it would be a great homage to represent some of these great Shadoks quotes with simple, looping animations.”

    Below are all four of Hélène's animations:





    I pump, therefore I am.


    If we keep trying, we end up succeeding. Therefore: the more we fail, the more we get to succeed.



    When you don't know where you are going, you have to get there... as fast as possible.



    Why should it be simple when it can be complicated?!
    Last edited by 9A; 11-30-2022 at 07:22 AM.

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    July 12, 2011

    450th Anniversary of St. Basil's Cathedral






    Built in 1561, St. Basil's Cathedral is an architectural treasure for both Russia and the world. As this is one of my personal favorite buildings of all time, it was difficult for me to not become completely caught up in every detail while drawing [even knowing how small it appears on the homepage]. Never the less, above is the high resolution version of this doodle!


    posted by Jennifer Hom

  42. #12892
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    July 27, 2011

    Enrique Granados' 144th Birthday



    Pantaleón Enrique Joaquín Granados y Campiña [27 July 1867 – 24 March 1916], commonly known as Enrique Granados, was a Spanish composer of classical music, and concert pianist. His most well-known works include Goyescas, the Spanish Dances, and María del Carmen.

    Granados wrote piano music, chamber music [a piano quintet, a piano trio, music for violin and piano], songs, zarzuelas, and an orchestral tone poem based on Dante's Divine Comedy. Many of his piano compositions have been transcribed for the classical guitar; examples include Dedicatoria, Danza No. 5, and Goyescas.

    His music can be divided into three styles or periods:

    A romantic style including such pieces as Escenas Románticas and Escenas Poeticas.
    A more typically nationalist, Spanish style including such pieces as Danzas Españolas [Spanish Dances], 6 Piezas sobre cantos populares españoles [Six Pieces based on popular Spanish songs].

    The Goya period, which includes the piano suite Goyescas, the opera Goyescas, various Tonadillas for voice and piano, and other works.

    Granados was a significant influence on at least two other famous Spanish composers and musicians, Manuel de Falla and Pablo Casals. He was also the teacher of composer Rosa García Ascot.

  43. #12893
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    July 29, 2008

    50th Anniversary of NASA








    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and space research.

    NASA was established in 1958, succeeding the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics [NACA]. The new agency was to have a distinctly civilian orientation, encouraging peaceful applications in space science. Since its establishment, most US space exploration efforts have been led by NASA, including the Apollo Moon landing missions, the Skylab space station, and later the Space Shuttle. NASA is supporting the International Space Station and is overseeing the development of the Orion spacecraft, the Space Launch System, Commercial Crew vehicles, and the planned Lunar Gateway space station. The agency is also responsible for the Launch Services Program, which provides oversight of launch operations and countdown management for uncrewed NASA launches.

    NASA's science is focused on better understanding Earth through the Earth Observing System; advancing heliophysics through the efforts of the Science Mission Directorate's Heliophysics Research Program; exploring bodies throughout the Solar System with advanced robotic spacecraft such as New Horizons; and researching astrophysics topics, such as the Big Bang, through the Great Observatories and associated programs.

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    April 26, 2011

    Vallenato Festival 2011






    The Vallenato Legend Festival is one of the most important musical festivals in Colombia. The festival features a vallenato music contests for best performer of accordion, caja vallenata and guacharaca, as well as piqueria [battle of lyrics] and best song. It's celebrated every year in April in the city of Valledupar, Department of Cesar.

  45. #12895
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    Feb 12, 2012

    Anna Pavlova's 131st Birthday





    A Russian prima ballerina of the late 19th and the early 20th centuries. She was a principal artist of the Imperial Russian Ballet and the Ballets Russes of Sergei Diaghilev. Pavlova is most recognized for her creation of the role of The Dying Swan and, with her own company, became the first ballerina to tour around the world, including South America, India and Australia.

  46. #12896
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    Apr 14, 2017

    56th Anniversary of Xingu Indigenous Park




    Officially dedicated in 1961, Xingu Indigenous Park celebrates its 56th anniversary today. The park is located in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso and spans 6,528,530 acres of savannah and forest.

    Xingu’s primary goal was to protect the social diversity of Brazil’s indigenous people, and was created after a long campaign by activist brothers, Orlando and Leonardo Villas-Bôas. Some of the tribes that call Xingu home are the Kamayurá, Kaiabi, Yudjá, Aweti, Mehinako, Wauja, Yawalapiti, Ikpeng, Kalapalo, Kuikuro, Matipu, Nahukwá, Suyá, and Trumai. In all, several thousand indigenous people live within the park’s boundaries.

    Today’s Doodle puts Xingu indigenous culture on full display. Hugged tightly by the all-important Xingu River, the design incorporates Xingu cultural elements like fishing baskets, cassava root, buildings, and headdress.

  47. #12897
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    5 May 2015

    Nellie Bly's 151st Birthday



    In 1880, the Pittsburgh Dispatch published an article titled "What Girls Are Good For.” In dismissive terms, the column’s author wrote that women shouldn't be allowed to work because their place was at home.

    Days later, a pseudonymous rebuttal appeared in the paper. The response, by a 16-year-old girl whose real name was Elizabeth Jane Cochran, argued how important it was for women to be independent and self-reliant. Within a decade, the author of that response would become known worldwide as Nellie Bly: a hard-hitting young journalist who went undercover at a lunatic asylum and traveled around the world in a record-breaking 72 days.

    Throughout her life and career, Nellie Bly spoke up for the underprivileged, the helpless and minorities, and defied society’s expectations for women. We love her adventurous spirit, and we share her belief that women can do anything and be anything they want [we like to think if she were around today she’d be a fellow fan of trailblazing women like Ada, Anita and Ann]. So when it came time to honor Nellie with a Doodle, we wanted to make it special. Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs wrote, composed and recorded an original song about Nellie, and Katy Wu, the artist who created this doodle, created an animation set to Karen O’s music celebrating this intrepid investigative reporter.

    Nellie was born on May 5, 1864 in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pa. After her response was published in the Dispatch in 1880, the editor, George Madden, tracked her down and hired her as a reporter. At the time, women reporters commonly used pen names; hers came from a song by fellow Pittsburgher Stephen Foster. She spent several years at the paper before moving to New York for a job at New York World, which was owned by Joseph Pulitzer. In 1887, she went undercover at the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell's Island to write an exposé about the conditions there. Her resulting book, “Ten Days in a Mad-House,” made her famous.

    But Nellie is best known for her trip around the world. Inspired by Phileas Fogg, the hero of Jules Verne’s novel, “Around the World in 80 Days,” Nellie set sail from New York in November 1889 determined to beat Fogg’s time. Traveling by steamships and sailboats, she sent dispatches back to her newspaper as she circled the globe. Instead of sitting idly and just observing, she was always a part of the action and conversation, despite the fact that public spaces were typically reserved for men at the time.

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    December 21, 2013

    100th Anniversary of the Crossword Puzzle





    See the interactive version here!

    We were lucky and excited to collaborate on our crossword doodle with Merl Reagle, one of the best and most well-known crossword constructors working today. Merl worked with Google engineer/crossword enthusiast, Tom Tabanao, to craft our puzzle grid and write all the clues. Merl's knowledge of the puzzle world—and perspective on crosswords in particular—is considerable. We thoroughly enjoyed the wit and humor he brought to the whole endeavor. Here are Merl's thoughts on the history of the crossword puzzle. -Ed.

    First, it was a huge honor to be asked to do this. Many, many thanks to Tom Tabanao for pulling me in and shepherding the project through.

    Second, it was a great opportunity to bring Arthur Wynne’s name into the public spotlight. He never made any money off the crossword, but he made tens of millions of puzzle fans around the world very happy. The fact that the first word across in the first-ever crossword was FUN is very appropriate, too. Crossword puzzles are indeed supposed to be fun—brainy fun, but fun nonetheless. The first puzzle also contained the word DOH, clued as “fiber of the gomuti palm”—but it’s also appropriate today, 100 years later, as something we would say when we don’t get a crossword clue right away. Maybe Arthur could see into the future! In any event, I am thrilled to have been a part of this centennial celebration.
    Last edited by 9A; 12-01-2022 at 06:55 AM.

  49. #12899
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    June 15, 2015

    800th Anniversary of the Magna Carta





    It’s 1215 in Runnymede, England. On the banks of the River Thames, King John sits nervously with a group of powerful barons. The mood at the negotiation table is tense, and the country teeters on the precipice of civil war. It’s no wonder the barons are hot under the collar--for years, the despotic King John has been doling out prison sentences with impunity, and the barons have descended upon him to demand their rights be recognized.

    The ensuing negotiations would result in the sealing of the Magna Carta. For the first time, a monarch entered a written contract that limited his power and made him answerable to his subjects. This was a profound idea, and one that would inspire political thinkers in some of history’s most pivotal moments.

  50. #12900
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    Jun 21, 2014

    World Cup 2014 #21






    A little sibling rivalry on our home page.

    A fun fact from the Google Trends World Cup headquarters:
    Germany is searching for Ghana player Kevin Prince Boateng 20% more than for his brother Jerome Boateng, even though the latter plays for Germany.

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