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Thread: Google doodles

  1. #6851
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    8 January 2009

    Jackson Pollock’s Birthday – Courtesy of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation / ARS, NY




    Paul Jackson Pollock was an American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. He was widely noticed for his "drip technique" of pouring or splashing liquid household paint onto a horizontal surface, enabling him to view and paint his canvases from all angles. It was also called all-over painting and action painting, since he covered the entire canvas and used the force of his whole body to paint, often in a frenetic dancing style. This extreme form of abstraction divided the critics: some praised the immediacy of the creation, while others derided the random effects. In 2016, Pollock's painting titled Number 17A was reported to have fetched US$200 million in a private purchase.

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    4 Feb 2009

    Božena Němcová's Birthday




    Božena Němcová was a Czech writer of the final phase of the Czech National Revival movement.

    Her image is featured on the 500 CZK denomination of the banknotes of the Czech koruna.

  3. #6853
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    4 February 2013

    Last day of the Canadian Penny



    In Canada, a penny is a coin worth one cent, or 1⁄100 of a dollar. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, the official national term for the coin is the "one-cent piece", but in practice the terms penny and cent predominate. Penny was likely readily adopted because the previous coinage in Canada [up to 1858] was the British monetary system, where Canada used British pounds, shillings, and pence as coinage alongside U.S. decimal coins and Spanish milled dollars.

    In Canadian French, the penny is often known by the loanword cent; in contrast with the heteronymous word meaning "hundred", this keeps the English pronunciation. Slang terms include cenne, cenne noire, or sou noir [black penny], although common Quebec French usage is sou.


    Production of the penny ceased in May 2012,[1] and the Royal Canadian Mint ceased distribution of them as of February 4, 2013.[2] However, the coin remains legal tender.[3] Nevertheless, once distribution of the coin ceased, vendors were no longer expected to return pennies as change for cash purchases, and were encouraged to round purchases to the nearest five cents.[4] Non-cash transactions are still denominated to the cent.

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    4 February 2013

    Manuel Alvarez Bravo's 111st Birthday






    Manuel Álvarez Bravo was a Mexican artistic photographer and one of the most important figures in 20th century Latin American photography. He was born and raised in Mexico City. While he took art classes at the Academy of San Carlos, his photography is self-taught. His career spanned from the late 1920s to the 1990s with its artistic peak between the 1920s and 1950s. His hallmark as a photographer was to capture images of the ordinary but in ironic or Surrealistic ways. His early work was based on European influences, but he was soon influenced by the Mexican muralism movement and the general cultural and political push at the time to redefine Mexican identity. He rejected the picturesque, employing elements to avoid stereotyping. He had numerous exhibitions of his work, worked in the Mexican cinema and established Fondo Editorial de la Plástica Mexicana publishing house. He won numerous awards for his work, mostly after 1970. His work was recognized by the UNESCO Memory of the World registry in 2017.

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    5 Feb 2013

    64th anniversary of Alberto Larraguibel's record setting Puissance jump






    Colonel Alberto Larraguibel Morales was a Chilean Army officer born in Angol, Chile. He remains as the record holder for highest jump, one of the longest-running unbroken sport records in history – 72 years as of 2021.

    Larraguibel broke the equestrian high jump record at 2.47 metres [8.1 ft], riding Huaso, formerly called "Faithful", at the Official International Event in Viña del Mar, Chile on February 5, 1949.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 07:35 AM.

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    11 Feb 2015

    Zdeněk Burian’s 110th Birthday





    Zdeněk Michael František Burian was a Czech painter, book illustrator and palaeoartist whose work played a central role in the development of palaeontological reconstruction.

    Originally recognised only in his native Czechoslovakia, Burian's fame later spread to an international audience during a remarkable career spanning six decades [1930s to 1980s]. He is regarded by many as one of the most influential palaeoartists of the modern era, and a number of subsequent artists have attempted to emulate his style.

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    13 Feb 2015
    Ivan Andreyevich Krylov’s 246th Birthday





    In Russia, our doodle depicts “The Crow and the Fox,” a fable by Russian fabulist Ivan Andreyevich Krylov for his 246th birthday.

  8. #6858
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    16 Feb 2015

    Rosenmontag 2015







    Rosenmontag is the highlight of the German Karneval [carnival], and takes place on the Shrove Monday before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. Mardi Gras, though celebrated on Fat Tuesday, is a similar event.

    Rosenmontag is celebrated in German-speaking countries, including Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Belgium, but most heavily in the carnival strongholds which include the Rhineland, especially in Cologne, Bonn, Düsseldorf, Aachen and Mainz. In contrast to Germany, in Austria, the highlight of the carnival is not Rosenmontag, but Shrove Tuesday.

    The name for the carnival comes from the German dialect word roose meaning "frolic" and Montag meaning Monday.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 07:48 AM.

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    16 February 2010

    2010 Vancouver Olympic Games - Curling






    Curling is a sport in which players slide stones on a sheet of ice toward a target area which is segmented into four concentric circles. It is related to bowls, boules and shuffleboard. Two teams, each with four players, take turns sliding heavy, polished granite rocks, also called stones, across the ice curling sheet toward the house, a circular target marked on the ice. Each team has eight stones, with each player throwing two. The purpose is to accumulate the highest score for a game; points are scored for the stones resting closest to the centre of the house at the conclusion of each end, which is completed when both teams have thrown all of their stones. A game usually consists of eight or ten ends.

    The player can induce a curved path, described as curl, by causing the stone to slowly turn as it slides. The path of the rock may be further influenced by two sweepers with brooms or brushes, who accompany it as it slides down the sheet and sweep the ice in front of the stone. "Sweeping a rock" decreases the friction, which makes the stone travel a straighter path [with less "curl"] and a longer distance. A great deal of strategy and teamwork go into choosing the ideal path and placement of a stone for each situation, and the skills of the curlers determine the degree to which the stone will achieve the desired result. This gives curling its nickname of "chess on ice".

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    16 February 2011

    Miriam Ruth's Birthday. Illustrations inspired by Ora Eyal. Permission courtesy of the Poalim Publishing Group




    Ruth was born in 1910 in Nova Zmki which was part of the kingdom of Austro-Hungary. She studied psychology at the University of Brno, and after immigrating to Israel in 1931 she studied at the Hebrew University.

    She was involved in education for many years and taught at Oranim College. But, her history as a teacher or student is less important. Ruth wrote children’s books that until today considered to be the best for babies and small kids.She created some of the most famous books preschools in Modern Hebrew literature, including her first book “Story of Five Balloons” [1974], “Yael’s House” and “Hot Corn”. In 2002 Ruth got the Bialik Prize for Literature.

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    17 Feb 2011

    Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena's Birthday




    Guillermo González Camarenawas a Mexican electrical engineer who was the inventor of a color-wheel type of color television, and who also introduced color television to the world.

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    19 Feb 2011

    Constantin Brancusi's 135th Birthday





    My high school art history teacher had always sung the praises of Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși, but seeing his work in textbooks couldn't compare to recently viewing the Sleeping Muse in person at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It's a piece that commands attention, as it seems to defy gravity with its elegance and poise. Brâncuși's use of bronze imbues his art with a silent, intense energy, as the viewer sees the room - and themselves - reflected and fractured in the surface of the work. And when he turns to marble, it gives his sculptures even more of a quiet dignity, always with powerful undertones of potential movement.

    It was an honor to have had the opportunity to celebrate Brâncuși, whose work I've admired for so long. Brâncuși was born in 1876 and spent much of his life in Paris, where he pioneered his distinctive style of simplifying subjects into their most essential geometric forms. This doodle contains a survey of some of his best-known and most characteristic work, from left to right: Prometheus, Leda, The Newborn, Sleeping Muse, Mademoiselle Pogany, Bird in Space, and The Kiss.

    Other works for which he is well-known include an ensemble of sculptures in Targu-Jiu, a Romanian city close to his hometown. Of these, the Column of the Infinite, a 98-feet-high cast-iron column, is perhaps one of his most iconic pieces. Fans of Brâncuși can visit the Atelier Brâncuși in Paris, a reconstruction of his workshop that's overflowing with pieces, tools, sketches, and studies.


    posted by Sophia Foster-Dimino

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    20 Feb 2011

    Mihaly Munkacsy's Birthday




    Mihály Munkácsy was a Hungarian painter. He earned international reputation with his genre pictures and large-scale biblical paintings.

    Neither 19th century visual art nor the historical developments of Hungarian art can be discussed without considering Munkácsy's contributions. His works are considered the apogee of national painting. He was a standard-setter, an oeuvre of reference value. He was one of the few with whom the antiquated colour techniques of 19th century Austro-Hungarian painting reached its most powerful and most lavish expression.

    In 2005, the Hungarian National Gallery organized in Budapest the first ever comprehensive exhibition of Munkácsy's paintings scattered throughout the world. As many as 120 pieces were borrowed from different institutions, museums and private collections. The exhibition catalogue published on the occasion, entitled Munkácsy a nagyvilágban [Munkácsy in the World] also included a number of reproductions of his paintings. The three-month exhibition was a feast for Hungarians who had little access to his original works. Paintings by Munkacsy are in the Milwaukee Art Museum, Dayton Institute of Art [Ohio], and the Albany [New York] Museum of Art and History, and The Condemned is part of the Founding Collection at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle [Washington]. His paintings also hang in the Arad Art Museum [Romania] and the Ferenc Mora Art Museum [Szeged, Hungary].


    • Mihály Munkácsy is honored by Hungary by issuing a postage stamps: on 1 July 1932 which bears his portrait; on 18 March 1977 his painting “Flowers” was depicted on a postage stamp in the series Flowers by Hungarian Painters.
    • Honored by Luxembourg by issuing two postage stamps on 20 May 1996.


    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 08:32 AM.

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    12 June 2017

    Russia National Day 2017





    Today is Russia Day, and the bouncing birch logs in our Doodle are excited to celebrate with the rest of the country!

    While many Russians will celebrate the day off by attending a fireworks show or concert in a city square, others will drive down country roads lined with birch trees, on their way to their family’s dacha [summer home]. The birch is one of Russia’s most recognizable symbols. With ties to Slavic folklore, arts, culture, and medicine, the birch tree has planted its roots firmly in the hearts of Russians both young and old.

    The birch's pale, slender, black-flecked trunk and bright fall leaves have inspired Russian artists across the centuries to pay homage to it — including our guest artist for today’s Doodle, Oscar nominee and animator Konstantin Bronzit.

    С Днем России! [Happy Russia Day!]

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    16 Jun 2013

    Granadas Millenium








    One of my favorite places I've ever visited: Granada, Spain.

    When it popped up in the pipeline as a potential Google Doodle celebrating the Granadas Millenium, I knew I had to do it. A fellow doodler was gracious enough to let me take the assignment off his hands, though it meant I had to juggle the deadline with a mildly interactive Father's Day doodle on the same day.


    Sketch from the rooftop. This view looks upward, revealing more houses winding their way up the hillside.

    While the doodle acknowledges a festive occasion, I really wanted to highlight the amazing juxtapositions of the city itself: A majestic Moorish/Medieval stronghold against the stuccoed Spanish houses. The expanse of the Sierra Nevada mountain range against the narrow winding alleyways. The city itself is at once wonderfully alive and sleepy with plenty to do or not do.

    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 08:44 AM.

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    23 Jun 2013

    Mt Fuji becomes a World Heritage site





    Mount Fuji, located on the island of Honshū, is the highest mountain in Japan, standing 3,776.24 m [12,389.2 ft]. It is the second-highest volcano located on an island in Asia [after Mount Kerinci on the island of Sumatra], and seventh-highest peak of an island on Earth. Mount Fuji is an active stratovolcano that last erupted from 1707 to 1708. The mountain is located about 100 km [62 mi] southwest of Tokyo and is visible from there on clear days. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is covered in snow for about five months of the year, is commonly used as a cultural icon of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photography, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.

    Mount Fuji is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku. It is a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and one of Japan's Historic Sites. It was added to the World Heritage List as a Cultural Site on June 22, 2013. According to UNESCO, Mount Fuji has "inspired artists and poets and been the object of pilgrimage for centuries". UNESCO recognizes 25 sites of cultural interest within the Mount Fuji locality. These 25 locations include the mountain and the Shinto shrine, Fujisan Hongū Sengen Taisha, as well as the Buddhist Taisekiji Head Temple founded in 1290, later depicted by Japanese ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 08:50 AM.

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    23 June 2017

    Hokiichi Hanawa’s 271st Birthday




    When Helen Keller visited the memorial house of Hanawa Hokiichi in 1937, she said of the revered scholar, "I believe that his name would pass down from generation to generation like a stream of water." Indeed, traces of Hokiichi's legacy can be found in many fields today. Like a river originating from humble beginnings in Tokyo in 1746, his influence has stretched through law, politics, economics, history, and medicine.

    Even during his lifetime, Hokiichi's impact was far-reaching. He is best known for editing the Gunsho ruijū, a collection of more than 500 volumes of kokugaku studies [philology and philosophy]. Later in life, Hokiichi established the Wagakusho school, where he taught Japanese classics to a rapt audience of adoring students.

    Hokiichi’s early life was not easy — at the age of seven, he lost his vision. But his remarkable memory began to impress local scholars, and he was encouraged to pursue a life of study, ultimately becoming one of the most learned men in the country. Hanawa Hokiichi’s legacy is one of dogged learning, committed teaching, and enduring perseverance, and it lives on in Japanese scholarship and culture.

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    19 August 2020

    Julius Lothar Meyer's 190th birthday








    Today’s Doodle celebrates German chemist, professor, and author Julius Lothar Meyer on his 190th birthday. Meyer was one of two scientists to independently discover the periodic law of chemical elements and pioneer the earliest periodic tables.

    Julius Lothar Meyer was born into a medical family in Varel, Germany on this day in 1830. Initially devoted to the study of medicine, he soon shifted his focus to physiological chemistry. He earned his doctorate in 1858 and began his career as a science teacher the very next year.

    In 1864, Meyer published a seminal textbook called “Die modernen Theorien der Chemie" [“Modern Chemical Theory”]. The treatise included a rudimentary system for the organization of 28 elements based on atomic weight, a precursor to the modern periodic table. But Meyer was not alone in the sprint toward this scientific milestone, as Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev was independently developing similar ideas of his own.

    Meyer designed a more comprehensive table in 1868, but before he could publish, Mendeleev released his own paper that placed all the known elements in one table and cemented his place in science history. Meyer’s subsequent 1870 paper was groundbreaking in its own right, as its graphical demonstration of the relationship between atomic volume and atomic weight provided strong evidence for the periodic law describing cyclical patterns among the elements. Meyer’s now-famous display is depicted behind him in today’s Doodle artwork.

    Happy birthday, Julius Lothar Meyer, and thank you for braving the elements for the sake of scientific knowledge!

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    24 Aug 2020

    Ukraine Independence Day 2020




    Today’s Doodle commemorates Ukraine’s Independence Day, considered one of the most important Ukranian holidays of the year. On this day in 1991, Ukraine officially proclaimed full autonomy from Soviet rule.

    Illustrated in today’s Doodle is a wreath that showcases blue knapweeds and yellow sunflowers, colors that reflect the stripes of the Ukrainian flag. The country’s national flower is the sunflower, which saw a boom of cultivation across the rich soil of present-day Ukraine in the early 19th century, due in part to its useful and versatile oil.

    Today, sunflowers cover more than 20% of Ukraine’s farmable land, which helps to make the country the largest exporter of sunflower oil in the world.

    Happy Independence Day, Ukraine!

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    24 August 2015

    Duke Kahanamoku’s 125th Birthday





    The story of Duke Kahanamoku--the Hawaiian who, in 1912, first drew the world’s collective gaze upon the art of surfing--reads like mythology. Born in Honolulu in 1890, he is credited in over a dozen feature films, surfed the world’s most imposing swells before Californians knew what surfing was, won five Olympic medals in swimming and was elected sheriff of his beloved home county thirteen times.

    The Big Kahuna was a tremendous athlete, to be sure, and by all accounts staggeringly cool, but he also had a proclivity for heroics--one morning in 1925, just as dawn crept into the summer sky over Newport Beach, a 40-foot fishing vessel called the Thelma found herself in the grip of a sudden and violent squall. Waves hammered the Thelma’s deck, and the vessel succumbed to the thrashing breakers, stranding its crew in the surf. The Duke, who watched from the shore as he prepared for that morning’s ride, rushed headlong into the maelstrom with his surfboard and, along with three friends, managed to wrest twelve men from the clutches of the Pacific.

    Despite his charisma on the screen and two decades of Olympic triumphs, it is perhaps for moments like these--for his character, his ease in the water, his deep and unending love of Hawaii and her oceans--that Duke Kahanamoku is remembered most. He brought surfing to the world, and by force of his magnetism and singularly Hawaiian spirit helped The Islands achieve statehood. Today, on his 125th birthday, Matt Cruickshank recalls the legend of the “Ambassador of Aloha” with a Doodle of his iconic, 16-foot wooden surfboard and his warm, blithe smile. “Most importantly,” a reverent surfer remarks in a documentary about The Duke, “he was pure Hawaiian”.

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    31 Aug 2020

    Trinidad and Tobago Independence Day 2020






    Today’s Doodle celebrates the Independence Day of the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. When the clock struck midnight on this day in 1962, the islands of Trinidad and Tobago officially achieved independence from British colonial rule. To mark the historic moment, the country for the very first time raised its newly adopted red, white, and black national flag, which is depicted in the Doodle artwork.

    Each color of the flag’s diagonally striped design holds specific significance. The red that dominates the flag’s background symbolizes the sun and the energetic strength of the nation’s people. The black on the diagonal stripe represents the earth and a devotion to strength and solidarity. Lastly, the white stands for equality and alludes to the ocean that connects the nation’s two primary islands.

    Happy Independence Day, Trinidad and Tobago!

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    31 August 2011

    110th Anniversary of the Lisbon Tram






    The "amarelos da Carris" [English:Yellows of the Rails] are a symbol of Lisbon, plying the narrow streets, steep and winding.

    The Lisbon tramway network is operated by Carris. It presently comprises 5 lines, and has a total length of 48 km [30 mi]] in 900 mm [2 ft 11+7⁄16 in] gauge, of which 13 km [8.1 mi] is on reserved tracks.

    Carris employs 165 brakemen [conductors of trams], funiculars and an elevator [the Santa Justa lift] and a runs a fleet of 57 tram vehicles [39 historical, 10 articulated trams and 8 light rail cars], based at a single depot - Santo Amaro.



    Lisbon tram.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 03:45 PM.

  23. #6873
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    10 April 2019

    First Image of a Black Hole







    A black hole is a region of spacetime where gravity is so strong that nothing—no particles or even electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. The boundary of no escape is called the event horizon. Although it has an enormous effect on the fate and circumstances of an object crossing it, according to general relativity it has no locally detectable features. In many ways, a black hole acts like an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe directly.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 03:50 PM.

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    14 Apr 2019

    Hùng Kings' Commemoration Day 2019






    Almost 5000 years ago, in the Red River Valley of Southeast Asia, the Hùng Kings established Văn Lang, the precursor of modern Vietnam. Today’s Doodle celebrates Hùng Kings' Commemoration Day, in remembrance of the ancient leaders of the Hong Bang era, the traditional founders of Vietnam who ruled for 18 generations.

    The first Hùng King, Kinh Durong Vurong, and the 17 leaders who succeeded him, laid the foundations of Vietnamese culture. The Hong Bang was a time of cultural flourishment, known for producing some of the most acclaimed Asian art of the Bronze Age.

    Once a mostly regional observance, Hùng Kings' Commemoration Day has been a national holiday in Vietnam since 2007, encouraging more citizens to learn about the ancient history of their country. In the early morning, a grand procession of palanquins heaped with offerings of food, flowers, and clouds of fragrant incense makes its way up the mountain to the Hùng King Temple, accompanied by flags, banners, and traditional music. Young boys and girls in ornate holiday attire make the journey as well as delegates from all over Vietnam.

    Singing, dancing, and making Bánh Chưng and Bánh Dầy — traditional rice cakes enjoyed during Lunar New year — are also important parts of Hùng Kings 'Commemoration Day. Many celebrants make time for games, engaging in battles of wits on the chessboard or forming circles to play đá lông, an acrobatic game of skill and agility played by kicking a feathered shuttlecock.

    Happy Hùng Kings' Commemoration Day!

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    14 April 2021

    Oliver De Coque’s 74th birthday




    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Lagos-based guest artist Ohab TBJ, pays tribute to Nigerian musician Oliver de Coque on his 74th birthday. Crowned the “Highlife King of Africa,” he is widely revered as one of the continent's most prolific recording artists.

    Born on this day in 1947 in the small town of Ezinifite in southeastern Nigeria, Oliver Sunday Akanite first took up the guitar at a young age, and as a teenager, studied the traditional Igbo music of the region and Congolese soukous. In 1970, at a performance by the popular Sunny Agaga and his Lucky Star Band, Akanite convinced Sunny to let him stand in as their guitarist; he was hired on the spot, providing a massive boost to his young career. Also a skilled player of the Nigerian board game okwe, Akanite became known as “Oliver de ka Okwe,” which he later adapted into his stage name, Oliver de Coque.

    De Coque famously infused the modern West African highlife genre with a Congolese-influenced guitar style and the energetic dance elements of Igbo music he grew up with, crafting a unique musical style, which he called Ogene. Beginning with his first solo release in 1976, de Coque’s music only grew in popularity at home and abroad, as he put out album after album featuring his masterful guitar work and fresh take on African pop–over 70 throughout his lifetime.

    In 1994, in recognition of his prodigious music achievement, de Coque was awarded an honorary doctorate in music by the University of New Orleans.

    Thank you, Oliver de Coque, for strumming your way into the hearts of listeners around the world!

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    17 Apr 2014

    The Peak District becomes Britain's 1st National Park






    The
    Peak District is an upland area in England at the southern end of the Pennines. Mostly in northern Derbyshire, it includes parts of Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, West Yorkshire and South Yorkshire. It can be split into the Dark Peak, where most moorland is found and the geology gritstone, and the White Peak, a limestone area of valleys and gorges cutting through the limestone plateau. The Dark Peak forms an arc on the north, east and west sides; the White Peak covers the central and southern tracts. The historic Peak District is larger than the area of the National Park, which excludes major towns, quarries and industrial areas. It became the first of the national parks of England and Wales in 1951. Nearby Manchester, Stoke-on-Trent, Derby and Sheffield send millions of visitors a year. Some 20 million people live within an hour's journey. Inhabited from the Mesolithic era, it shows evidence from the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages. Settled by the Romans and Anglo-Saxons, it remained largely agricultural; mining arose in the Middle Ages. Richard Arkwright built cotton mills early in the Industrial Revolution. As mining declined, quarrying grew. Tourism came with the railways, thanks to the landscape, spa towns at Buxton and Matlock Bath, Castleton's show caves, and Bakewell, the park's one town. Walking, cycling, rock climbing and caving are popular.



  27. #6877
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    17 April 2010

    Karen Blixen's 125th Birthday






    Baroness Karen Christenze von Blixen-Finecke was a Danish author who wrote works in Danish and English. She is also known under her pen names Isak Dinesen, used in English-speaking countries, Tania Blixen, used in German-speaking countries, Osceola, and Pierre Andrézel.

    Blixen is best known for Out of Africa, an account of her life while living in Kenya, and for one of her stories, Babette's Feast, both of which have been adapted into Academy Award–winning motion pictures. She is also noted, particularly in Denmark, for her Seven Gothic Tales. Among her later stories are Winter’s Tales.

    Blixen was considered several times for the Nobel Prize in Literature, though wasn't awarded because judges were reportedly concerned about showing favoritism to Scandinavian writers, according to Danish reports.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-21-2021 at 04:55 PM.

  28. #6878
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    22 September 2021


    Autumn 2021 [Northern Hemisphere]




    Depending on where you live, it probably still feels like summer [or winter], but change is upon us. And that tipping point is Wednesday at 12:21 p.m. PT, when the autumnal and vernal equinoxes arrive.

    The word “equinox” comes from the Latin for “equal” and “night.” Essentially, it’s the biannual event when the sun is directly over the equator.

    For those living north of the globe’s belly line, the autumnal equinox heralds the coming of progressively shorter days and the much cooler weather, due to the 23.5-degree tilt of the Earth’s rotational axis in relation to its orbit around the sun. Those living south of the equator can expect to see just the opposite with the vernal equinox — longer days and warmer weather.

    Google is marking the occasion with a pair of animated Doodles that feature a happy little hedgehog delivering a bouquet that reflects the personality of each season. For those in the north, you have the fall foliage of yellow and orange leaves, while in the south, the hedgehog’s delivery features the bright colors of flowers blooming.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-22-2021 at 04:35 AM.

  29. #6879
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    22 September 2017

    Fall Equinox 2017 [Northern Hemisphere]




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    22 September 2018

    Autumn Equinox 2018 [Northern Hemisphere]





    Happy Fall Equinox!


    Today marks the first day of autumn, astronomically speaking at least. The autumnal equinox — the celestial event in which the sun is directly above the equator — occurs around 1:54 AM UTC. That means night and day will be almost exactly equal in length, since the earth’s tilt and position in orbit render it parallel with the sun. Just following the equinox, the northern hemisphere will gradually begin to tilt away from the sun’s rays and usher in the cool, crisp autumn weather.

    This year’s seasonal Doodle series protagonist, Quinn, curiously follows the path of a falling leaf, waking up a new friend hidden in the deciduous mound. Surely as the trees begin to turn, many, like Quinn, will find warmth in the company of friends old and new, and fun in the potential of colorful, crunchy leaf piles!

    Doodle by Sophie Diao, with coloring help from Vrinda Zaveri

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    23 September 2014

    First Day of Autumn 2014





    Autumn, also known as Fall in North American English, is one of the four temperate seasons. Outside the tropics, autumn marks the transition from summer to winter, in September [Northern Hemisphere] or March [Southern Hemisphere], autumn is the season when the duration of daylight becomes noticeably shorter and the temperature cools considerably. Day length decreases and night length increases as the season progresses until the Winter Solstice in December [Northern Hemisphere] and June [Southern Hemisphere]. One of its main features in temperate climates is the striking change in colour for the leaves of deciduous trees as they prepare to shed.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-22-2021 at 04:29 AM.

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    22 September 2010

    Moon Festival/Mid-Autumn Festival 2010




    The Mid-Autumn Festival, also known as the Moon Festival or Mooncake Festival, is a traditional Chinese festival celebrated by many East and Southeast Asian countries and regions. It is the second-most important holiday after Chinese New Year with a history dating back over 3,000 years, when the Emperor of China worshipped the moon for bountiful harvests.

    The festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the Chinese lunisolar calendar with a full moon at night, corresponding to mid-September to early October of the Gregorian calendar. On this day, the Chinese believe that the moon is at its brightest and fullest size, coinciding with harvest time in the middle of Autumn.

    Lanterns of all size and shapes, are carried and displayed – symbolic beacons that light people's path to prosperity and good fortune. Mooncakes, a rich pastry typically filled with sweet-bean, egg yolk, meat or lotus-seed paste, are traditionally eaten during this festival. The Mid-Autumn Festival is based on the legend of Chang'e, the moon goddess in Chinese mythology.

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    30 Sept 2010

    Flintstones' 50th Anniversary








    As a young kid, I drew a lot of dinosaurs. My dad would bring home reams of dot matrix printer paper from work, which I'd take, fold into stapled booklets, and then fill with dinosaurs doing what dinosaurs did best — eating, leaping about, facing off in epic combat on top of spewing volcanoes. What I didn't know was that dinosaurs were also quite handy. A brontosaurus tail made an excellent water slide, you could walk up a row of plates on a stegosaurus' back like a flight of stairs, and the triceratops' horns were actually cutting-edge can openers. For these paleontological insights into Stone Aged innovation, I have the Flintstones to thank.

    The Flintstones may have lived in the prehistoric town of Bedrock, but their technology was on par with much of what we use today. Everyone drove human-powered vehicles [zero emissions!], composted scraps in a dinosaur under the kitchen sink, and even wore solar powered watches—that is, if you count sundials. In short, Bedrock was the modern city of the past... and I wanted to live in it! Unfortunately, that didn’t quite pan out, but to be able to pay tribute to one of my favorite childhood TV shows in the form of a Google doodle is easily the next best thing.

    On the 50th anniversary of its first airing, we gladly salute “The Flintstones” for inspiring our imaginations and encouraging us to think outside of the box, even if it means taking a look back now and then. I hope you’ll join the rest of us here at Google in a little nostalgia to mark this fun occasion!

    Oh, and if you know any saber-toothed tigers looking for an internship as a hole puncher, give me a buzz.


    posted by Mike Dutton

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    30 Sept 2010

    Flintstones' 50th Anniversary








    As a young kid, I drew a lot of dinosaurs. My dad would bring home reams of dot matrix printer paper from work, which I'd take, fold into stapled booklets, and then fill with dinosaurs doing what dinosaurs did best — eating, leaping about, facing off in epic combat on top of spewing volcanoes. What I didn't know was that dinosaurs were also quite handy. A brontosaurus tail made an excellent water slide, you could walk up a row of plates on a stegosaurus' back like a flight of stairs, and the triceratops' horns were actually cutting-edge can openers. For these paleontological insights into Stone Aged innovation, I have the Flintstones to thank.

    The Flintstones may have lived in the prehistoric town of Bedrock, but their technology was on par with much of what we use today. Everyone drove human-powered vehicles [zero emissions!], composted scraps in a dinosaur under the kitchen sink, and even wore solar powered watches—that is, if you count sundials. In short, Bedrock was the modern city of the past... and I wanted to live in it! Unfortunately, that didn’t quite pan out, but to be able to pay tribute to one of my favorite childhood TV shows in the form of a Google doodle is easily the next best thing.

    On the 50th anniversary of its first airing, we gladly salute “The Flintstones” for inspiring our imaginations and encouraging us to think outside of the box, even if it means taking a look back now and then. I hope you’ll join the rest of us here at Google in a little nostalgia to mark this fun occasion!

    Oh, and if you know any saber-toothed tigers looking for an internship as a hole puncher, give me a buzz.

    posted by Mike Dutton

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    30 September 2019

    Harry Jerome’s 79th Birthday



    “Never give up” was a fitting motto for Harry Jerome, the Canadian athlete who broke barriers as he broke records. Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Toronto-based guest artist Moya Garrison-Msingwana, depicts the statue of Jerome that stands in Vancouver’s Stanley Park. That city also hosts the annual Harry Jerome International Track Classic, a meet named in honor of the champion sprinter.

    Born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan on this day in 1940, Harry Winston Jerome broke a Canadian record for the 220-yard sprint at age 18, soon earning an athletic scholarship to the University of Oregon. His grandfather John “Army” Howard had been the first black athlete to represent Canada in the Olympics. Jerome and his younger sister Valerie both carried on the family legacy, traveling to Rome to compete in the 1960 Olympic Games.

    Although a pulled muscle prevented him from running in the finals, Jerome went on to represent Canada at two more Olympic Games, winning the bronze medal in 1964. He also won gold medals in the Pan American Games and Commonwealth Games. Starting in 1960, Jerome would equal or break four world sprinting records over the course of his career.

    In 1969 Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau invited Jerome to help set up Canada’s Ministry of Sport. He was awarded the prestigious Order of Canada in 1971 and later named British Columbia’s Athlete of the Century. Inspiring young athletes of color to pursue their dreams and achieve their fullest potential, Jerome traveled across Canada holding sports clinics for high school students.

    His life inspired the documentary film Mighty Jerome and his legacy is celebrated each year with the Harry Jerome Awards, which recognize excellence in Canada’s black community.

    Here's to a champion who never gave up.

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    30 September 2016

    Andrejs Jurjans’s 160th birthday






    Today’s Doodle celebrates a man who, in many ways, carried Latvian music forward into the 20th century.

    As the country’s first professional composer and musicologist, Andrejs Jurjāns delved into the Latvian folk music of the past while taking the sounds of his homeland to new heights. Throughout his lifetime, he collected and analyzed thousands of folk melodies, organizing them into an anthology that was published across six volumes. He also composed the first-ever Latvian symphonic works, including an instrumental concerto and a cantata, and was well-known for his choir arrangements.

    When Jurjāns wasn’t crafting original pieces, he spent much of his time teaching. From 1882 — the year he finished his own schooling at the St. Petersburg Conservatory — to 1916, he shared his knowledge of music theory and more with students. Through his instruction, research, and composition, Jurjāns inspired many of the Latvian musicians who came after him. Today we pay tribute to that legacy on what would have been the composer’s 160th birthday.

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    1 Oct 2016

    Nigeria Independence Day 2016





    This year on National Day, Nigeria celebrates 56 years of independence. Annual celebrations usually start with the President’s speech and continue with patriotic parades and festivities. In Nigeria and all over the world, people host parties festooned with green and white flags, play games, and enjoy traditional, home-cooked foods.

    Today’s Doodle showcases sectors that Nigeria is developing and takes great pride in, such as agriculture, science, literature, engineering, and culture including Naija music and the Nollywood industry. Young people are key to the country’s future and are shown here celebrating in patriotic green and white fashions.

    Happy Independence Day, Nigeria!

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    1 October 2020

    Mid-Autumn Festival 2020 [Japan]






    Today’s Doodle commemorates the Japanese Mid Autumn Festival, which translates to “moon viewing.” Dedicated to the celebration of the harvest moon–the first full moon after the autumnal equinox–the holiday provides an opportunity to appreciate the year’s harvest and reflect on the passage of the seasons.

    The Japanese tradition of Otsukimi is said to date back well over a millennium to the country’s Nara period of the 700s. During the Heian period that followed, Japan’s aristocrats were known to celebrate with festive banquets, boat outings, and moonlit poetry recitals. The holiday gained popularity over the centuries and today is celebrated across the country.

    One way many honor Otsukimi is to decorate their homes with pampas grass or susuki, a symbol of the season’s bounty. Custom also calls for the preparation of special dishes like tsukimi-dango, bite-sized rice dumplings [a staple food in Japan] that resemble the full moon and are reputed to bring health and good fortune.

    Happy Mid Autumn Festival, Japan!

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    27 July 2018

    Lyudmila Rudenko’s 114th Birthday





    On this day in 1904, one of the world’s most influential chess players was born in Lubny, Ukraine. Twenty-four years later, Lyudmila Rudenko achieved the first major check[mate] in her storied career when she won the 1928 Moscow Women’s Championship. This championship was just one of the many prestigious titles she’d earn in her lifetime. As an International Master in the World Chess Federation [FIDE] and later Woman Grandmaster, Rudenko made a career paving the way for women to come.

    Rudenko was first introduced to chess by her father at just ten years old. Initially interested in swimming, she placed first at a local competition in Odessa, Ukraine in the 400-meter breaststroke before moving to Moscow in 1925 and refining her gift for chess.

    In 1950, Rudenko became the second woman ever to win the Women’s World Chess Championship—a title she held until 1953. In 2015, she was inducted into the World Chess Hall of Fame. In fact, despite her major accomplishments in the game, she considered her life’s most important achievement to be organizing the evacuation of children during the Siege of Leningrad in World War II.

    Today’s Doodle—which draws artistic inspiration from 1960s graphic art and posters—reimagines a focused Rudenko’s determination during the world championship game.

    On what would’ve been her 114th birthday, we honor Rudenko’s achievements both on and off the board.

    Cднем ​​рождения, Lyudmila!

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    27 July 2011

    Enrique Granados' 144th Birthday






    Pantaleón Enrique Joaquín Granados y Campiña, commonly known as Enrique Granados, was a Spanish composer of classical music, and concert pianist. His most well-known works include Goyescas, the Spanish Dances , and María del Carmen.

  41. #6891
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    29 Jul 2011

    Medellin Flower Festival 2011





    The Flowers Festival is a festival that takes place in Medellín, Colombia. The festival is the most important social event for the city and includes a pageant, automobiles, a Paso Fino horse parade and many musical concerts.

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    29 July 2008

    50th Anniversary of NASA






    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and space research.

    NASA was established in 1958, succeeding the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics [NACA]. The new agency was to have a distinctly civilian orientation, encouraging peaceful applications in space science. Since its establishment, most US space exploration efforts have been led by NASA, including the Apollo Moon landing missions, the Skylab space station, and later the Space Shuttle. NASA is supporting the International Space Station and is overseeing the development of the Orion spacecraft, the Space Launch System, Commercial Crew vehicles, and the planned Lunar Gateway space station. The agency is also responsible for the Launch Services Program, which provides oversight of launch operations and countdown management for uncrewed NASA launches.

    NASA's science is focused on better understanding Earth through the Earth Observing System; advancing heliophysics through the efforts of the Science Mission Directorate's Heliophysics Research Program; exploring bodies throughout the Solar System with advanced robotic spacecraft such as New Horizons; and researching astrophysics topics, such as the Big Bang, through the Great Observatories and associated programs.

  43. #6893
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    7 Aug 2008

    Joachim Ringelnatz's Birthday







    Joachim Ringelnatz is the pen name of the German author and painter Hans Bötticher. His pen name Ringelnatz is usually explained as a dialect expression for an animal, possibly a variant of Ringelnatter, German for Grass Snake or more probably the seahorse for winding its tail around objects. Seahorse is called Ringelnass by mariners to whom he felt belonging. He was a sailor in his youth and spent the First World War in the Navy on a minesweeper. In the 1920s and 1930s, he worked as a Kabarettist, i.e., a kind of satirical stand-up comedian. He is best known for his wry poems, often using word play and sometimes bordering on nonsense poetry.

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    7 August 2019

    Panteleimon Kulish’s 200th Birthday






    Today’s Doodle celebrates the renowned Ukrainian writer, historian, and translator Pateleimon Kulish, born on this day in 1819. Through his literary works, including the epic poem Ukraïna, and historical novels like Chorna Rada [The Black Council], Kulish helped establish a cultural identity for his homeland, the second largest country on the European continent after Russia. Kulish was also the first person to translate the Bible into the Ukrainian language.

    Raised in a poor family of Cossack descent, Kulish was not allowed to finish his studies at Kyiv University, since his family was not of the noble class. Nevertheless, he was able to hold various teaching positions, as well as become a prolific author. Inspired by the Cossacks, who were adventurous outdoorsmen who fought for a free Ukrainian state during the 17th century, Kulish and the poet Taras Shevchenko were at the forefront of a Ukrainian national revival.

    Although the country was ruled by Russia during his lifetime, Kulish’s writing—heavily influenced by European Romantic literature and the Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott—championed the unique qualities of Ukrainian heritage and culture. He joined Shevchenko in the Cyril and Methodius Brotherhood, a secret society that sought independence for Ukraine. As a result, he was arrested by Tsarist police and imprisoned in 1847 before being exiled to the Russian city of Tula for three years.

    He married the writer Hanna Barvinok, established his own printing press, and continued to publish and translate throughout his life. Notes on the Southern Rus, his collection of Ukrainian folklore, is still studied by many to this day.

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    10 August 2017

    Ecuador National Day 2017




    The people of Quito, Ecuador declared independence from Spain 208 years ago today. While the city of Quito was relatively small at the time, this declaration laid the foundation for sovereignty for the entire country.

    Today, we celebrate Ecuador National Day with a Doodle that features the awe-inspiring Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve – a national park and biodiversity hotspot that’s nearly twice the size of Rhode Island!

    If you want to explore the reserve for yourself, you’ll need a boat: the reserve’s forest is submerged in water for two-thirds of the year. This mix of lagoons, swamps, and dry land creates an incredibly diverse ecosystem with over 500 species of birds, 12 species of monkeys, and countless other animals. It’s also just one of 45 protected areas throughout Ecuador, emphasizing the country’s commitment to preserving nature.

    In the cities of Ecuador – and especially Quito – the streets come alive during the month of August, celebrating the country’s independence with with parades, concerts, and cultural exhibitions.

    Happy National Day, Ecuador!

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    24 September 2018

    Celebrating Altamira Cave







    Charging bisons, wild horses, and mysterious handprints—primeval evidence of humanity’s creative genius, miraculously well preserved after some 36,000 years. Today’s Doodle celebrates the 139th anniversary of the first discovery of cave paintings at the Altamira caves in Cantabria, northern Spain—a masterpiece of the prehistoric era.

    Nicknamed “the Sistine Chapel of paleolithic art,” Altamira was discovered in 1879 by the amateur botanist and archaeologist Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola who first noticed animal bones and flint tools there. He returned his daughter Maria, who first noticed the red and black paintings covering its walls and ceiling, rendered in charcoal and hematite, depicting animals including European bison and bulls.

    Early claims of the caves’ paleolithic origin were mostly dismissed as fake. Some argued that the art, which includes abstract shapes as well as depictions of wildlife, was too sophisticated for the time. Then in 1902 a French study of Altamira proved these paintings were in fact paleolithic, dating to between 14,000 and 20,000 years ago. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Altamira caves are open for public visitation.

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    24 September 2018

    Mid-Autumn Festival 2018







    Today, many east Asian nations celebrate Mid-Autumn Festivals, timed with the harvest moon – including China, Taiwan, Hong Hong, Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, and Vietnam. This shared holiday is generally a day off work for the whole country, and jumps around on the Roman calendar because it’s based on the lunar one.

    Going under various names, Mid-Autumn Festivals occur on the first full moon after the Fall equinox. The position of the moon is important for rice farming, and mid-Autumn festivals are linked this way to agriculture. East Asian countries have their own mythologies and folk traditions associated with Mid-Autumn festivals. Japan has a story about a visible goddess and rabbit in the moon. Koreans believe it’s a day to celebrate their ancestors. China’s traditions, carried out in several other countries as well, involve lighting thousands of red paper lanterns.

    All Mid-Autumn Festivals involve food, and most include some form of “moon cakes.” Chinese and Vietnamese moon cakes are baked and branded with characters; Korean mooncakes are made from rice flour and steamed over pine needles; Japanese mooncakes are spherical, like little moons.

    In general these Mid-Autumn Festivals are about families getting together to express gratitude, and celebrate seasonal change. They often stretch to three days, incorporating the days before and after, and rank among the biggest holidays of the year.

    So to East Asia and the entire diaspora: Happy Mid-Autumn Festival!

    Doodle by Cynthia Yuan Cheng

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    24 September 2014

    60th anniversary of the unveiling of the first Routemaster bus






    ‘The wheels on the bus go round and round’ sings the famous nursery rhyme and in London, they've now been going round and round for over 50 years.


    Much like the actual London bus, doodle Kevin Laughlin’s design evolved over time before coming full circle. This was the initial sketch idea.

    The first Routemaster buses left the depot on their maiden journeys in 1956 and with their distinctive red colour, they soon became a popular sight for Londoners and a worldwide icon.
    Kevin experimented with a more illustrative style, but felt that perhaps the animation was too rigid.

    Over the years, millions of commuters, schoolchildren, tourists and evening revellers have all used the humble bus to take them to work, school, see the sights and then take them home again after their busy days.


    In a third version, Kevin went for an updated style of the bus. The fluidity of the animation felt more satisfying… though maybe too fluid-like?

    While the London bus has evolved over the years, the reliability of the service and Londoners' love of it remain the same. Those wheels will carry on going round and round for many years to come.

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    24 September 2012

    Howard Florey's 114th Birthday






    Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey, was an Australian pharmacologist and pathologist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Sir Ernst Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for his role in the development of penicillin.

    Although Fleming received most of the credit for the discovery of penicillin, it was Florey who carried out the first clinical trials of penicillin in 1941 at the Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford on the first patient, a police constable from Oxford. The patient started to recover, but subsequently died because Florey was unable, at that time, to make enough penicillin. It was Florey and Chain who actually made a useful and effective drug out of penicillin, after the task had been abandoned as too difficult.

    Florey's discoveries, along with the discoveries of Fleming and Ernst Chain, are estimated to have saved over 200 million lives, and he is consequently regarded by the Australian scientific and medical community as one of its greatest figures. Sir Robert Menzies, Australia's longest-serving Prime Minister, said, "In terms of world well-being, Florey was the most important man ever born in Australia."
    Last edited by 9A; 09-22-2021 at 09:16 AM.

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    28 Sept 2012

    David Unaipon's 140th Birthday






    David Ngunaitponi , known as David Unaipon, was an Aboriginal Australian man of the Ngarrindjeri people, a preacher, inventor and author. Unaipon's contribution to Australian society helped to break many Aboriginal Australian stereotypes, and he is featured on the Australian $50 note in commemoration of his work.

    His inventions included a centrifugal motor, a multi-radial wheel and a mechanical propulsion device. He was also known as the Australian Leonardo da Vinci for his mechanical ideas, which included pre World War I drawings for a helicopter design based on the principle of the boomerang and his research into the polarisation of light and also spent much of his life attempting to achieve perpetual motion.
    Last edited by 9A; 09-22-2021 at 09:20 AM.

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