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Thread: Google doodles

  1. #4351
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    1 Aug 2006
    Swiss National Day 2006





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    7 September 2015
    Brazil's Independence Day 2015





    Orchids! Palm trees! Passion flowers! There’s no landscape in the world quite as colorful as Brazil’s, whose independence we celebrate today. In 1822, from the banks of the grassy Ipiranga Brook in São Paulo, Dom Pedro I declared Brazil a free nation. Centuries later, visitors to the Terra do Brasil come to enjoy its awesome mix of natural offerings, captured in this doodle by Kevin Laughlin. Its main rainforest “is home to as many as 80,000 plant species,” according to the World Wide Fund for Nature. Brazil’s fauna is also impressive, with hundreds of unique mammals roaming its land, and thousands of fish species swimming through its waters. Happy independence day to beautiful, bountiful Brazil!

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    16 September 2019
    Respect for the Aged Day 2019





    Today’s Doodle celebrates Japan’s Respect for the Aged Day, also known as Keiro no Hi. Starting in a small village in Hyōgo Prefecture, it was conceived as a time to be kind to seniors and ask for their wisdom and advice about ways to improve life in the village. By 1966, it had become a national holiday to pay respect to elders on the third week of September and is now celebrated all across Japan.

    Starting in 2003, the holiday was moved to the third Monday in September. The resulting long weekend allows working people time to visit their parents and grandparents. Those who cannot return home in person often call or write. Some volunteers deliver food to homebound elders, and other communities organize special shows known as keirokai, where young people entertain an aged audience.

    Japanese people tend to be very long-lived, with elderly residents making up over 26 percent of the total population. Many Japanese people wear red on their 60th birthday, because according to tradition, age 60 marks a new beginning to be a child once again.

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    16 September 2013
    Mexico Independence Day 2013




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    17 Sept 2013
    Max Švabinský's 140th Birthday




    Max Švabinský was a Czech painter, draughtsman, graphic artist, and professor in Academy of Graphic Arts in Prague. Švabinský is considered one of the more notable artists in the history of Czech painting and produced significant work during the first half of the 20th century. He was relatively unusual among modernist artists in that his work was accepted by the communist regime; this was due at least in part to his having formed his artistic personality prior to 1900, prior to the advent of cubism. His work was part of the painting event in the art competition at the 1932 Summer Olympics.

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    18 Sept 2013
    Uzeyir Hacibeyov's 128th Birthday [Azerbaijan]



    Uzeyir bey Abdul Huseyn oglu Hajibeyli was an Azerbaijani composer, conductor, publicist, playwright, and social figure. He is recognized as the father of Azerbaijani composed classical music and opera. Uzeyir Hajibeyov composed the music of the national anthem of Azerbaijan Democratic Republic [which was re-adopted after Azerbaijan regained its independence from the Soviet Union in 1991]. He also composed the anthem used by Azerbaijan during the Soviet period. He was the first composer of an opera in the Islamic world.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 10:01 PM.

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    18 Sept 2013
    203rd anniversary of the First Government Assembly in Chile



  8. #4358
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    18 September 2017
    Chile National Day 2017





    On this date in 1810, the first Junta de Gobierno [Government Junta] was formed, and the Chilean people embarked on an eight-year-long struggle for independence from Spain.

    Many Chileans take advantage of the holidays and the good weather to travel and gather with friends and family. Kites fill the skies, and revelers dance the traditional cueca. Children and grown-ups alike might indulge in a sack race, fight to the top of a palo ensebado [greased pole], or even try a game of pillar el chancho, aiming to catch a very greasy pig!

    Today’s Doodle, by Chilean artist Paloma Valdivia, celebrates the country’s pride in its diverse people and its bountiful natural resources. Each element of the Doodle carries a special meaning:


    • The Mapuche [indigenous people] and the huaso [Chilean cowboys] represent Chile's diverse people.
    • The mountain represents the Andes Mountain range, which stretches along Chile’s eastern borders and is home to some of the world’s tallest peaks.
    • The little red boat signifies the special relationship Chileans share with the sea and its resources.
    • The cactus represents the north of Chile, home to the driest desert in the world, the Atacama.
    • The penguin represents Chile’s Antarctic territory, base to several Chilean and international research stations. Remote Easter Island is home to the moai, gigantic monoliths carved by the Rapa Nui people centuries ago.
    • The majestic condor [among the world’s heaviest flying birds] and the bright red copihue [Chile’s national flower] symbolize the country’s rich biodiversity.


    With so much to celebrate, we hope you'll join us in shouting a loud and happy ¡Feliz Dieciocho!
    Last edited by 9A; 06-17-2021 at 05:19 PM.

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    18 September 2017
    55th Anniversary of Khao Yai National Park





    Today we celebrate the 55th anniversary of one of Thailand’s treasures, Khao Yai National Park. Khao Yai is the oldest national Park in Thailand, nestled in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, about 3 hours outside of Bangkok. With the help of renowned Thai conservationist, Boonsong Lekakul, the Thai government declared the park protected land on September 18, 1962. The sprawling 837 square mile park is a treasure to visitors from around the world.

    Today’s slideshow Doodle will take you on a journey through the park to catch a glimpse of wildlife unique to Thailand, such as gaurs, ottors, and gibbons. Khao Yai is a sanctuary for over 70 types of mammals, including elephants, bears, and deer, as well as hundreds of species of birds. Visitors are even known to come across macaque monkeys in the winding roads as they venture into the park! Khao Yai is also home to magnificent waterfalls, hiking trails, and even white water rafting.

    If you’re planning a visit to the park, you’re not alone – Khao Yai welcomes over a million visitors each year to take in nature, seek out wildlife sightings, and sleep under the stars. As a place with so many natural wonders to behold, we celebrate the 55 years of Khao Yai and hope for many more to come.

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    18 Sept 2017
    Samuel Johnson’s 308th Birthday





    If you wanted to know what the word 'lexicographer' means today, you might Google it. If you fancy a throwback however, you might grab a dictionary. Today’s Doodle celebrates the 308th birthday of British lexicographer – a person who compiles dictionaries – Samuel Johnson.

    Samuel Johnson published A Dictionary of the English Language in 1755 after 9 years of work. It was described as “one of the greatest single achievements of scholarship,” and had a far-reaching effect on modern English. It was “colossal” at nearly 18 inches tall! Johnson’s was the premier English dictionary until the publication of the Oxford English Dictionary 150 years later.

    Johnson was also a poet, essayist, critic, biographer and editor. Johnson’s dictionary was more than just a word list: his work provided a vast understanding of 18th century's language and culture. His lasting contributions guaranteed him a place in literary history.

    Today we pay homage to this pioneer lexicographer who dedicated years to his craft.
    Doodle by Sophie Diao

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    16 Sept 2017
    Mexico National Day 2017






    Happy National Day, Mexico!

    Not far from the modern metropolis of Mexico City lies another important city—one that’s at least 1,300 years old. Today’s Doodle by guest artist Luis Pinto pays tribute to the ancient city Teotihuacan, constructed between the 1st and 7th centuries. Who actually built the ancient city remains a mystery.

    Visitors to Teotihuacan stand in the shadows of the towering Pyramids of the Sun and Moon, and the detailed Temple of Quetzalcoatl. At night, a spectacular light and sound show brings the pyramid carvings to life in brilliant colors. You can also view the city from above in a hot air balloon; just keep an eye out for Quetzalcoatl, the “feathered serpent” responsible for the wind.

    Many Mexicans today are descendants of its indigenous people, and the country is a rich mosaic of old and new. On September 16th, people of all ancestries come together to remember the famous Grito de Dolores, or “Cry of Dolores,” that set Mexico on the path to a united country for all.

    ¡Viva México!

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    16 Sept 2017
    Emilia Pardo Bazán’s 166th Birthday







    A 19th-century novelist, professor, and women’s rights activist, Emilia Pardo Bazán was a trailblazer in more ways than one. Born in A Coruña, Spain to a family who believed in the power of education, she took an early interest in literature – and her academic pursuits didn’t stop there. Despite women being forbidden to study science and philosophy, Pardo Bazán became well versed in both by seeking out information on her own.

    She went on to write a number of novels, short stories, and essays, winning her first literary prize in 1876. Her affinity for science also came through in her writing, where her reality-driven descriptions introduced the naturalist movement to Spain. Her signature style was on full display in her two most famous novels, Los pazos de Ulloa [1886] and La madre naturaleza [1887]. In her published works and beyond, Pardo Bazán endlessly championed women’s rights. She also taught at the University of Madrid, where she became the first woman to occupy a chair of literature.

    Inspired by the statue of Pardo Bazán that stands in her hometown, today’s Doodle pays tribute to the prolific author on what would’ve been her 166th birthday.

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    16 September 2014
    40th anniversary of the first broadcast of Casimir







    The spotlight is on Casimir the Dinosaur on our homepage in France today. Casimir starred in the famous French cartoon “l'Île aux enfants” [“The Children’s Show”], which first aired 40 years ago today.

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    15 Sept 2014
    Nicaragua Independence Day 2014





    Our doodle in Nicaragua doodle features the sacuanjoche, the country’s national flower for Nicaraguan Independence Day.

  15. #4365
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    15 September 2019
    Celebrating Ynés Mexía






    In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, today’s Doodle celebrates Mexican-American botanist and explorer Ynes Mexía, who braved earthquakes, bogs, and poisonous berries to reach a remote volcano on the border of Colombia and Ecuador—all for the sake of botanical discoveries. “We started on the long journey back,” she wrote after collecting samples of the rare wax palm, “very tired, very hot, very dirty, but very happy.”

    On this day in 1925, Mexía embarked on her first plant collection trip, travelling with a group from Stanford University to Sinaloa, Mexico in search of rare botanical species. The 55-year-old had joined the local Sierra Club just a few years earlier, enrolling in special classes at UC Berkeley soon after. Despite falling off a cliff and fracturing her hand and some ribs, Mexía brought home around 500 specimens—50 of them previously undiscovered.

    Born in Washington D.C. in 1870 as a daughter to a Mexican diplomat, Mexía moved around a lot before becoming a social worker in California and falling in love with nature. At age 51, she began studying botany. After her inaugural plant discovery trip in 1925, Mexía continued journeying to uncover more species throughout Mexico, many of which were then named after her. The first was a flowering plant from the daisy family named Zexmenia mexiae in 1928, now referred to as Lasianthaea macrocephala.

    Although she never completed her degree, Mexía became one of the most celebrated collectors of botanical specimens in history, gathering some 150,000 specimens throughout her career. She went on to travel the world while researching, writing, and lecturing widely.

    More than 90 years after she started, scientists are still studying Mexía’s samples, which are now housed in a number of major institutions around the world.

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    6 February 2019
    Waitangi Day 2019




    Waitangi Day is the national day of New Zealand, commemorating the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. In honour of Waitangi Day, today’s Doodle celebrates the unique native flora of the island nation.

    Geographically isolated in the South Pacific Ocean, New Zealand has evolved a diverse variety of plant life. Some 80 percent of the islands’ fern, flower, and tree species are native to the country and, most can be found nowhere else in the world.


    The silver fern has long been a symbol of New Zealand’s identity, appearing on the uniforms of national sports teams as well as military troops. To Māori, it has been a symbol of strength and resilience.. Known to grow up to 10 meters in height, the underside of the silver fern’s leaves reflects moonlight, making it helpful when following forest trails at night.

    New Zealand’s unofficial national flower, the bright yellow blossoms of the Kōwhai tree, appear near the end of winter. The tree’s bark is renowned for its medicinal properties, useful for treating everything from dandruff to seal bites.

    The Pōhutukawa’s crimson flowers bloom around the holiday season, leading to the name “New Zealand Christmas Tree.” The plant also figures prominently in Māori legends as a bridge between the living and the spirit world. Aside from decorating homes and churches, the Pōhutukawa’s nectar can be used to make delicious honey and treat sore throats.

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    6 February 2011
    Jan Werich's Birthday





    Jan Werich was a Czech actor, playwright and writer.
    His collaboration with Jiří Voskovec and Jaroslav Ježek lasted for more than 10 years. Their partnership was a platform for their numerous left-wing political satires. The trio's work took inspiration from Dada, with its love of the absurd, a reaction against bourgeois values and the horrors of World War I.

    In the years leading up to World War II and the closure of Czechoslovak theatres, Werich, Voskovec and Ježek were forced into exile in the United States in 1938, where Voskovec and Ježek remained for the rest of their lives. Werich returned to his homeland five years later, and started a partnership with Miroslav Horníček. He also worked with famous puppeteer Jiří Trnka to write modern fairy tales.

    With his new business partner Miroslav Horníček at his side, he re-staged many of the plays he had created with Voskovec in the 1930s but set them in the political content specific to the time.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-17-2021 at 06:07 PM.

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    6 February 2017
    Pramoedya Ananta Toer's 92nd Birthday







    It might be said that Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s pen was his sword. Known as ‘Pramoedya’ or “Pram,’ this Indonesian writer was a proponent of human rights and freedom of expression who fought against Japanese and Dutch colonialism in his country.

    Born on February 6, 1925, in a village called Blora on Java, Pram was exposed to political activism through his father, and came to journalism while working as a stenographer for a Japanese news agency. Incarcerated from 1947–1949 for being “anti-colonial,” he wrote his first novel, The Fugitive behind bars.

    His novels throughout the 1950s continued to hold a mirror up to the impact of colonialism. Following a coup and suspected of ties to the Indonesian communist party, Pram was sent to the Indonesian island of Buru in 1969 where he spent over a decade as a political prisoner. When refused pen and paper, Pram turned to oral storytelling, sharing a story with his fellow prisoners about a Javanese boy named Minke who spurns Indonesia’s hierarchical society in the last years of Dutch colonization. Granted a typewriter towards the end of his term, he brought Minke’s tale to life through the four-volume Buru Quartet, his most well-known work. In fact, the books were smuggled out of Indonesia by Pram's friend, a German priest, to avoid being taken or destroyed, and have now been translated into more than 20 languages worldwide.

    Today’s Doodle celebrates Pram’s birthday with an animation of the industrious novelist seated at his typewriter, hard at work.

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    6 February 2021
    Celebrating the Vernadsky Research Base






    What do magnetometers, snowmobiles, and penguins all have in common? Each can be found in full-swing at the Ukrainian Akademik Vernadsky Research Base, an Antarctic scientific center widely acclaimed for its climate change research studies. Today’s Doodle celebrates this historic station, which officially transferred from British to Ukrainian control on this day in 1996.

    Located on the tiny island of Galindez in the Antarctic Circle, the Vernadsky station is the direct successor to the British Faraday base, which was first established as a meteorological observatory in 1947. Today, the Vernadsky station is operated by a rotating staff of a dozen winterers. For about ten months at a time, each winterer endures extreme isolation [there isn’t a town within 1,000 nautical miles!] and sub-zero temperatures, all in the name of scientific progress. When they aren’t busy preparing for expeditions into the Antarctic wilderness, the base’s personnel work year-round to maintain the station and conduct research on everything from penguin populations to the atmospheric effects of ultraviolet radiation.

    Cheers to everyone who keeps their cool at the Vernadsky base, thank you for helping to provide a better understanding of our changing planet!

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    1 Feb 2021
    Fredy Hirsch's 105th birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 105th birthday of German-Jewish educator and athlete Fredy Hirsch. Known for his charismatic spirit and commitment in supporting children, Hirsch helped save Jewish youth during World War II and enriched their lives with the arts.

    Alfred “Fredy” Hirsch was born on this day in 1916 in Aachen, Germany, where he started his career as a teacher at several Jewish youth organizations and sports associations. He was openly gay at a time when queer people were being prosecuted by the growing Nazi party. In an effort to escape, Hirsch sought refuge in Czechoslovakia, until the Nazi regime invaded the country and deported him to the Terezin Ghetto and later Auschwitz in 1943.

    Against all odds, Hirsch continued teaching at Auschwitz and set up a children’s daycare. He did everything in his power to give hope to the youth in his block—organizing concerts, encouraging children to paint scenes from fairy tales, and even salvaging tin cans to help children create sculptures. Many of the children that Hirsch taught credit him for sparking their creative pursuits, like Zuzana Růžičková who survived Auschwitz and later became one of the world’s greatest harpsichordists.

    On February 11, 2016, in commemoration of Hirsch’s 100th birthday, the high school he attended in Aachen renamed its gymnasium and cafeteria in his honor. Today, these buildings stand as testaments to his unbreakable spirit and carry forward his legacy of improving the lives of young people.

    Happy birthday, Fredy Hirsch. Here’s to an indomitable hero who reminds the world to push forth with courage and optimism, even during the most trying of times.

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    18 Feb 2021
    Celebrating Yee Sang



    Lou Hei! Today’s Doodle celebrates Yee Sang, a Malaysian raw fish salad traditionally enjoyed on the seventh day of the Lunar New Year. With chopsticks in hand, families toss the ingredients that make up Yee Sang high above the table while they exclaim “Lou Hei” and wish each other good fortune for the year to come—the higher the toss, the better the fortune!

    This ritual traces its origins to the Chinese creation myth of goddess Nu Wa, who is said to have created humanity on the seventh day of the new year. Chinese fishers and sailors commemorated this symbolic day of rebirth by combining the leftovers of the new year’s celebrations to make yu sheng—a salad as thrifty as it was tasty.

    By the 1930s, Chinese immigrants brought the Yu Sheng tradition to Malaya, selling fish salad with ginger and lettuce out of hawker carts. But it wasn’t until the 1940s, when Seremban chef Loke Ching Fatta added a twist, that the recipe was adapted to the Yee Sang known today. Fatta combined some 30 ingredients together with his signature sauce to invent the dish now loved by many during the Lunar New Year.

    One of the most common combinations of Yee Sang include raw fish, ginger, shredded carrot, radish, pomelo, leek, topped with condiments like crushed peanuts, all mixed thoroughly with several different oils and spices. But there is no wrong way to make Yee Sang, as the dish has infinite variations.

    Here’s to Yee Sang and prosperity in the Lunar New Year!

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    26 Feb 2021
    Lantern Festival 2021







    Today’s Doodle honors the annual celebration, known as the Lantern Festival, a treasured occasion signaling the finale of Lunar New Year celebrations all over the world.

    The Lantern Festival tradition has been practiced for more than 2000 years, dating back to China’s Han Dynasty. Once known as Shang Yuan, early lantern festivals were designed as offerings to the gods, and families lit lanterns near their homes to represent a holy place.

    Since its inception, the Lantern Festival is now celebrated across Asian and around the globe with illuminating art installations, in addition to lanterns of various sizes and designs. The lanterns are painted with everything from pandas to cats, and each have their own meaning, such as great fortune or luck in a relationship.

    Happy Lantern Festival!

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    12 September 2018
    Caio Fernando Abreu’s 70th Birthday





    Born on this day in 1948 in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, Caio Fernando Abreu is one of his country’s most celebrated contemporary writers, whose work explored the LGBTQ+ experience and sensitive themes such as loneliness, alienation, and AIDS.

    Abreu studied dramatic arts in college and worked as an editor and pop culture journalist before focusing on writing stories, novels, and plays. In 1975 he won honorable mention in a national fiction contest, but he is best known for his collection of stories Os dragões não conhecem o paraíso, which translates from Portuguese as “Dragons do not know the paradise.” First published in 1987, it was eventually translated into French and English and retitled simply ‘Dragons...’

    I’ve got a dragon living with me.

    No, it’s not true.

    I haven’t really got a dragon. And even if I did have, he wouldn’t live with me.

    These enigmatic and evocative lines from ‘Dragons…’ reflect the central theme of this work. In Abreu’s fiction “Dragons” represent individuals living at the margins of society—drag queens, gay teens, bisexual men, and a range of others —unknowable, lonely, powerful, untamable, invisible, and perceived by the mainstream as dangerous. Today’s Doodle pays tribute to Abreu’s courageous and compassionate spirit, and his insightful and emotionally charged body of work.

    Like many Brazilian artists and writers at the time he ran afoul of the DOPS, the "Department for Political and Social Order," a government agency that maintained files on anyone considered a potential enemy of the state. His novel Onde Andara Dulce Veiga [Whatever Happened to Dulce Veiga?] won the Best Novel award in 2000 from the São Paulo Association of Art Critics and he won won three Jabuti Prizes, Brazil’s most prestigious literary honor. Two of Abreu's short stories were adapted into films and plays, and his novel Onde Andará Dulce Veiga became a 2008 feature film, directed by his friend Guilherme de Almeida Prado.

    Happy Birthday Caio Fernando Abreu!

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    12 September 2011
    Korean Thanksgiving 2011





    Chuseo, is a major harvest festival and a three-day holiday in both North and South Korea celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar on the full moon. Like many other harvest festivals around the world, it is held around the autumn equinox, i.e. at the very end of summer or in early autumn. It is one of the biggest traditional holidays.

    As a celebration of the good harvest, Koreans visit their ancestral hometowns and share a feast of Korean traditional food such as songpyeon and rice wines such as sindoju and dongdongju . There are two major traditions related to Chuseok: Charye [ancestor memorial services at home, also known as Jesa], and Seongmyo [family visit to the ancestral graves], which is usually accompanied by Beolcho [ Hanja: tidying graves, removing weeds around them].
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 09:16 AM.

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    6 Sept 2011
    Shinichi Hoshi's 85th Birthday





    Shinichi Hoshi was a Japanese novelist and science fiction writer best known for his "short-short" science fiction stories, often no more than three or four pages in length, of which he wrote over 1000. He also wrote mysteries and won the Mystery Writers of Japan Award for Mōsō Ginkō [Delusion Bank] in 1968.

    One of his short stories, "Bokko-chan" ["Miss Bokko"], was translated into English and published in Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in June 1963. His books translated into English include There Was a Knock, a collection of 15 stories, and The Spiteful Planet and Other Stories.

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    6 September 2010
    Google Instant Launch








    Google launches
    Google Instant, described as a search-before-you-type feature: as users are typing, Google predicts the user's whole search query [using the same technology as in Google Suggest, later called the autocomplete feature] and instantaneously shows results for the top prediction. Google claims that this is estimated to save 2–5 seconds per search query. SEO commentators initially believe that this will have a major effect on search engine optimization, but soon revise downward their estimate of the impact.

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    6 September 2015
    Fathers' Day 2015 [Australia, New Zealand]







    Happy Father’s Day to dads of all shapes, sizes, and species! Today’s Doodle represents the universality of familial love. I had a few separate concepts, some with animals, some with people, and looking at them all, I thought it would be fun to try to tie them together.

    Thank you to dads everywhere, for carrying us until we've learned to stand on our own, and sometimes even after.


    Olivia When, Doodler

    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 10:02 AM.

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    7 Sept 2015
    Brazil's Independence Day 2015







    Orchids! Palm trees! Passion flowers! There’s no landscape in the world quite as colorful as Brazil’s, whose independence we celebrate today. In 1822, from the banks of the grassy Ipiranga Brook in São Paulo, Dom Pedro I declared Brazil a free nation. Centuries later, visitors to the Terra do Brasil come to enjoy its awesome mix of natural offerings, captured in this doodle by Kevin Laughlin. Its main rainforest “is home to as many as 80,000 plant species,” according to the World Wide Fund for Nature. Brazil’s fauna is also impressive, with hundreds of unique mammals roaming its land, and thousands of fish species swimming through its waters. Happy independence day to beautiful, bountiful Brazil!

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    8 Sept 2015
    First Day of School 2015 [Canada]





    School’s back in session! Happy first day to all of the students and teachers who are welcoming the start of a new school year.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 10:43 AM.

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    8 September 2014
    Feliza Bursztyn's 81st Birthday




    Our doodle in Colombia is inspired by the work of sculptor Feliza Bursztyn to mark what would have been her 81st birthday.

    Feliza Bursztyn was born in Bogotá, Colombia in 1933 to Polish Jewish immigrants. Her parents had just been visiting Bogotá at the time of her birth in 1933. When they received news of Adolf Hitler's election to the German Chancellorship, they decided to remain in Colombia, where her father founded a small textile factory.

    Bursztyn entered the canon of Colombian art history as a key modern artist, but to place emphasis primarily on her formal innovations as they contributed to the development of modern, autonomous art in Colombia is to risk minimizing the ways in which her work challenged cultural hegemony and European-American discourses of modernity. Her art can be interpreted as problematizing the assumption that "development" is the answer to "underdevelopment," that modernity can be universally beneficial. In their confrontations with dominant power structures in Colombia that sought to control class and gender relations and morality, Bursztyn's work exposed modernity's dark side, coloniality



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    9 Sept 2014
    Leo Tolstoy's 186th Birthday













    I hardly need to say that making a tribute to Leo Tolstoy was a daunting task. No set of images can sum up a body of work so astonishing in scope, complexity, and vigor--its memorable scenes come to life with seeming effortlessness, fully realized in the immortal lines and between them. Tolstoy's lasting influence is a testament to the power of his art, which will remain relevant as long as the questions of life and death occupy our minds, which is to say – forever.

    Recently I designed and illustrated the Centennial Edition of James Joyce's Dubliners for Penguin Classics, which was a similarly challenging assignment. I felt that the only way to do justice to a book like Dubliners was to imitate some of the author's literary techniques in visual form. I froze the crowd on the cover between movement and paralysis, played with less obvious links between the stories, in short tried to evoke the atmosphere of the stories without giving away too much of the narrative or details.

    For writers like Joyce and Tolstoy the imagery remains unique for each reader. Both authors are careful and selective with words, allowing the reader's imagination to collaborate with the text instead of passively taking it in. The language of cartooning, likewise, is the language of reduction; it's less descriptive than realistic artwork or film, and is less likely to replace the reader's vision. It seemed fitting to focus on Tolstoy's central theme of dualism and to highlight his stylistic nuances through the rhythm of the sequences – the almost full moon against the almost starless night, the red of Anna's handbag, Ivan's fatal curtains that stand between him and the light of his spiritual awakening.

    When I started rereading Tolstoy, it struck me how robust and modern his style is. The use of repetition, colloquialisms, and unorthodox syntax, as well as the extraordinary control over time and pacing are as potent and urgent as they were more than a century ago. In his Lectures on Russian Literature Vladimir Nabokov rather delightfully describes how Tolstoy "...unwraps the verbal parcel for its inner sense, he peels the apple of the phrase, he tries to say it one way, then a better way, he gropes, he stalls, he toys, he Tolstoys with words."


    The word "dom" [meaning both "house" and "home," just as "mir" in War and Peace means both "world" and "peace"] appears on the opening page of Anna Karenina five times. The narrator's voice, at once invisible and distinctly Tolstoy's, shifts masterfully between the characters, allowing them to speak directly through minute detail, rhythm, and even occasional stream of consciousness, prefiguring the modernist techniques of the 20th century. In Anna Karenina's finest passages the narrator, the character, and the world are united in Tolstoy's seamless artistry.

    The stagelike format of the doodle seemed to lend itself perfectly for the chosen treatment, so the doodle team and I settled on two key images from the three major works. There's a myriad of scenes I'd outlined and sketched in the process, and I wish I could've include some of the lesser-known episodes, like Vronsky and Anna's encounter with the Russian painter in Italy, whose portrait of Anna is kept in the background of the narrative for hundreds of pages until it's seen again through Levin's eyes in one most striking scenes of the book.

    I sketched the chosen scenes digitally, then after a few revisions and adjustments went over them with brush and ink on layers and layers of paper. I then created a color scheme and assembled all these bits into digital layers that we arranged to move at varying speeds across the stage.

    I hope the doodle will inspire viewers to discover and revisit these scenes in the way Tolstoy intended: through reading and rereading his timeless narratives.
    Posted by Roman Muradov, guest doodler









    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 11:39 AM.

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    12 Sept 2014
    Ernesto Carneiro Ribeiro's 175th Birthday






    Fellow grammarians, today you meet your hero on our homepage in Brazil. We’re celebrating the 175th birthday of linguist, educator and physician Ernesto Carneiro Ribeiro, who worked to revise Brazil’s official grammar code to include conversational speech.

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    13 Sept 2014
    Laura Secord's 239th Birthday






    “The Americans are coming!” Those were not the words of Paul Revere but of Canadian heroine Laura Secord, who warned British forces of an impending American attack during the War of 1812. Secord walked 20 miles in the early morning hours to the DeCew House, the HQ of British lieutenant and war hero James FitzGibbon. We mark what would have been her 239th birthday in our doodle in Canada today.

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    13 September 2013
    Karolos Koun's 105th Birthday






    Karolos Koun was a prominent Greek theater director, widely known for his lively staging of ancient Greek plays.

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    9 Sept 2013
    100th anniversary of the first aviation "loop de loop" by Petr Nesterov





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    5 Sept 2013
    John Wisden's 187th Birthday




    John Wisden was an English cricketer who played 187 first-class cricket matches for three English county cricket teams, Kent, Middlesex and Sussex. He is now best known for launching the eponymous Wisden Cricketers' Almanack in 1864, the year after he retired from first-class cricket.

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    6 December 2017
    Finland Independence Day 2017






    December 6 is observed across Finland as Independence Day. This year marks the centennial anniversary of this joyous occasion, adding just a bit more sparkle to traditional celebrations.
    On cold [and sometimes snowy] Independence Day evenings, family and friends come together over warm drinks and sweet treats, tuning in to watch the Annual Independence Day Reception at the Presidential Palace.

    The ones willing to brave the cold outdoors are treated to the best of Finnish culture — hockey games, concerts, art festivals, and celebratory parades. Everywhere you turn, you’re met with infectious enthusiasm and good cheer.

    Today’s Doodle by Helsinki-based illustrator Janine Rewell depicts Finland’s native animals harmoniously gathered on a winter’s night. A single candle burns in the backdrop, just like the candles that light the windows of homes across the country. Captured in the colors of Finland’s national flag, the doodle reflects the spirit of cozy camaraderie and warmth in the snowy cold.

    Hyvää itsenäisyyspäivää, Suomi!

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    6 Dec 2017
    Elvia Carrillo Puerto's 139th Birthday







    Born on this day in Yucatán in 1878, Elvia Carrillo Puerto, known as The Red Nun, or La monja roja, helped propel feminism to the forefront of Mexican politics in the early 20th century. Poet and early feminist Rita Cetina Gutiérrez taught the young Puerto ideas of equality between the sexes, which would form the framework for Puerto’s lifelong work as a socialist and a feminist.

    As Puerto grew up, she dedicated her life to fixing the injustices caused by gender inequality, founding feminist resistance organizations like the Rita Cetina Gutiérrez League [named for her former teacher and mentor]. These leagues would deliver lectures to the public about women's health and the need for women in government.

    Puerto helped get women the right to vote and be elected in the state of Yucatán. She was elected to the legislature in 1923, continuing to fight for women's rights long after serving in that post. Her work would be influential in the introduction of Mexican women’s suffrage nationally in 1953.

    Mexico City-based illustrator Hilda Palafox created today’s Doodle in solidarity with Elvia Carrillo Puerto on what would be her 139th birthday. Today we honor her activism and advocacy, which have led women all over the world to fight for equality and representation.
    ¡Feliz cumpleaños, Elvia!
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 11:54 AM.

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    6 December 2011
    Finland National Day




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    12 Dec 2011
    Robert Noyce's 84th Birthday






    Having earned the nickname "The Mayor of Silicon Valley," it is no wonder why we had to honor Robert Noyce with a Google doodle. He was responsible for the invention of the early microchips and laid the ground work for all the innovative companies to spring from the Bay Area [including Google!]

    I knew that I had to celebrate his birthday in a geeky but accurate way-- the problem was that, as I sat down to draw, I realized I had no idea how motherboards and microchips differ.

    It wasn't until I visited our own hardware lab at Google and spoke with Noyce's wife, Ann, that I began to understand what I was trying to draw. With their help I was able to both identify a microchip and honor Noyce accurately!

    Posted by Jennifer Hom

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    12 December 2014
    100th anniversary of Platero y yo




    Platero is the eponymous donkey of the 1914 story Platero and I [English for Platero y yo]. The book is one of the most popular works by Spanish poet Juan Ramón Jiménez, the recipient of the 1956 Nobel Prize in Literature. In 1960, the Italian composer Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco composed a suite of music for guitar with narrator based on the book.

    Platero ["silvery"] is described in the lyric prose of the book as a "small donkey, a soft, hairy donkey: so soft to the touch that he might be said to be made of cotton, with no bones. Only the jet mirrors of his eyes are hard like two black crystal scarabs."

    The little donkey remains a symbol of tenderness, purity and naiveté, and is used by the author as a means of reflection about the simple joys of life, memories, and various characters and their ways of life.

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    12 December 2012
    50th Anniversary of Bonne Nuit les Petits






    Claude Laydu [10 March 1927 – 29 July 2011] was a Belgian-born Swiss actor on stage and in films. He was renowned for his performance in his film debut in the role of the young priest in Robert Bresson's Diary of a Country Priest [1950], which has been described as one of the greatest in the history of film.

    In 1962 he and his wife developed a puppet show for television, called Bonne Nuit les Petits [Good Night, Little Ones]. Five minutes long, it was shown nightly and its characters Nounours, Pimprenelle and Nicolas became known by generations of French children, as it was produced for more than a decade. Laydu performed the voice of the Sandman, who spoke the title each night. Laydu and his wife revived it in 1995 as Nounours and it ran for several years. There was associated development and marketing of numerous related books, records, videos and dolls.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 12:20 PM.

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    12 December 2011
    Gustave Flaubert's 190th Birthday







    Gustave Flaubert was a French novelist. Highly influential, he has been considered the leading exponent of literary realism in his country. According to the literary theorist Kornelije Kvas, "in Flaubert, realism strives for formal perfection, so the presentation of reality tends to be neutral, emphasizing the values and importance of style as an objective method of presenting reality".

    He is known especially for his debut novel Madame Bovary [1857], his Correspondence, and his scrupulous devotion to his style and aesthetics. The celebrated short story writer Guy de Maupassant was a protégé of Flaubert. On the occasion of Flaubert's 198th birthday [12 December 2019], a group of researchers at CNRS published a neural language model under his name.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 12:42 PM.

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    15 Dec 2011
    Friedensreich Hundertwasser's 83rd Birthday




    Friedrich Stowasser [December 15, 1928 – February 19, 2000], better known by his pseudonym Friedensreich Regentag Dunkelbunt Hundertwasser, was an Austrian visual artist and architect who also worked in the field of environmental protection.

    Hundertwasser stood out as an opponent of "a straight line" and any standardization, expressing this concept in the field of building design. His best known work is the Hundertwasserhaus in Vienna, Austria, which has become a notable place of interest in the Austrian capital, characterised by imaginative vitality and uniqueness.

    The Hundertwasserhaus is an apartment house in Vienna, Austria, built after the idea and concept of Austrian artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser with architect Joseph Krawina as a co-creator.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 12:48 PM.

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    17 Dec 2011
    Josef Lada's 124th Birthday





    Josef Lada [born 17 December 1887 in Hrusice, Bohemia – 14 December 1957 in Prague, buried at Olšany Cemetery] was a Czech painter, illustrator and writer. He is best known as the illustrator of Jaroslav Hašek's World War I novel The Good Soldier Švejk, having won the Deutscher Jugendliteraturpreis in 1963.

    The asteroid 17625 Joseflada has been named after him.
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 03:24 PM.

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    17 December 2018
    80th Anniversary of 'The Rapid Arrows






    A group of five boys with a thirst for adventure, the Rapid Arrows [or Rychlé šípy in the original Czechoslovakian] premiered as an action-packed comics series 80 years ago. Mirek Dušín, Jarka Metelka, Jindra Hojer, Červenáček [aka "Red Cap"], Rychlonožka [aka "Speedy"], and their trusty dog Bublina [aka "Bubble"] were an instant hit with young readers—and remain popular in the Czech Republic and Slovakia today.

    Created by the Czech writer Jaroslav Foglar, the Rapid Arrows comic quickly became a household name in families with young children. The group leader’s name, Mirek Dušín, has become a figure of speech for someone who is exemplary in every way—now used in a humorous way. Adapted into audio, film, and stage versions, the Rapid Arrows left a strong impact on pop culture in Eastern Europe and even inspired a wave of real-life youth clubs with many thousands of readers.

    The comic ran from 1938 to 1989, with two breaks in production caused by war and political changes. All the original comics were collected into one book in 1998, which has been reprinted several times since. The Rapid Arrows also appear in Foglar’s novel Mystery of the Conundrum, which was adapted into a 1969 TV series and later into a 1993 film.

    The boys’ search for the mechanical puzzle known as “Hedgehog in a Cage,” the Tleskač flying bicycle, and the sinister region of Stínadla continue to be loved by generations of readers and viewers.

    Doodle illustrated by Czech artist, Marek Rubec
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 03:28 PM.

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    18 Dec 2018
    Paul Klee's 139th Birthday







    Influenced by movements such as cubism, surrealism, and expressionism, Paul Klee explored numerous styles to develop his own approach to art-making—both rigorous and childlike—which defies categorization.Today’s Doodle pays homage to his Rote Brücke [Red Bridge], a 1928 work that transforms the rooftops and arches of a European city into a pattern of shapes rendered in contrasting yet harmonious hues. As Klee wrote in his diary, in 1914: “Color and I are one… I am a painter.”

    Born in Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland on this day in 1879, Klee was the son of a German music teacher and a Swiss singer. An accomplished violinist, Klee played in a symphony orchestra before dedicating himself to becoming a painter. He brought a musical sense of rhythm to the visual arts.

    Sketching landscapes and caricatures even in his early teens, Klee began keeping meticulous records of all his creations in 1911, whether panel paintings, works on paper, graphics, or sculptures. He studied dots, lines, planes, and forms observed from nature—whether from the fish tank he kept at home or the veins seen on leaves or the human body—applying his observations to a vast body of work.

    Along with his neighbor, the famous Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, Klee was affiliated with an influential circle of artists known as Der Blaue Reiter, which lasted from 1911 to 1914. He went on to teach at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany during the 1920s, and the Pedagogical Sketchbook he wrote for the benefit of his students is still used today.

    Klee never stopped pushing his creativity forward, producing a large number of works every year. In the year 1939, near the end of his career, he completed a record 1,239 works. “Some will not recognize the truthfulness of my mirror,” Klee wrote in his diary. “Let them remember that I am not here to reflect the surface... but must penetrate inside. My mirror probes down to the heart.”

    Happy Birthday, Paul Klee!
    Last edited by 9A; 06-18-2021 at 03:31 PM.

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    21 Dec 2018
    Connie Mark’s 95th Birthday







    Today’s Doodle honors the life and legacy of trailblazer Connie Mark, who served in the women’s branch of the British army in Jamaica during World War II. Later moving from her native Jamaica to England, she became a community activist, promoting Caribbean culture and ensuring that the women and people of color who contributed to the war effort received equal recognition.


    Connie Mark was born Constance Winifred McDonald in Kingston, Jamaica on this day in 1923. While her family tree included ancestors from Scotland, Calcutta, and Lebanon, Mark also had roots in Africa and grew up speaking Jamaican Patois [also known as Jamaican Creole] with roots in the Ghanaian language Twi.


    At age 19, Mark was recruited to work in the British Military Hospital of Kingston as a medical secretary, typing reports of battle injuries. Although she was promoted twice during her service spanning a decade, Mark was denied the usual pay raise for unknown reasons. Due to this, she became an unwavering advocate for fair pay and continued advocating for proper recognition of Caribbean servicewomen throughout her life.


    After settling in Britain in the 1950s, Mark became even more passionate about Caribbean culture and joined several charitable and educational projects. She organized community events, using oral history and poetry to instill pride in the youth of Caribbean and African descent.


    At the age of 68, Mark received the British Empire Medal, and two years later was given a Member of the British Empire [MBE] award in recognition of a lifetime of public service.


    95th birthday.Here’s to Connie Mark on what would have been her 95th birthday.

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    22 Dec 2018
    Teresa Carreño’s 165th Birthday






    Born in Caracas on this day in 1853, María Teresa Carreño García de Sena grew up in a musical family. Her father, a government minister descended from a distinguished composer, taught her to play piano at age six. By the time she was eight, her family moved to New York City, where Teresa began studying with the composer Louis Moreau Gottschalk, who was so impressed by her talents that he volunteered to teach her. She soon progressed to public performances. One 1862 review hailed her as a “musical phenomenon,” adding that it was “difficult to believe that it was the performance of a child.”

    Carreño was nine years old when she performed for President Abraham Lincoln in the White House during the fall of 1863. ”The President and his family received us so informally,” she wrote in a letter. “They were all so very nice to me that I almost forgot to be cranky under the spell of their friendly welcome. My self-consciousness all returned, however, when Mrs. Lincoln asked me if I would like to try the White House grand piano.”

    Carreno went on to study in Paris with distinguished teachers like Georges Mathias and Anton Rubenstein. She composed approximately 75 works—including the ‘Himno a Bolívar’ written in honor of national hero Simón Bolívar at the request of the Venezuelan government. Well known to all Venezuelans, this patriotic song is as familiar as the national anthem.

    Her name also lives on via Miami’s nonprofit Teresa Carreño International Piano Competition, recognizing and encouraging artistry in young players.

    Happy Birthday, Teresa Carreño!

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    - THE FOLLOWING IS NOT A GOOGLE DOODLE -


    From the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 21, 2019:

    ¨Black history often gets ignored in the classroom. This week, it was overlooked by another powerful influence in America: the Google Doodle.¨

    Davian Chester, a freelance illustrator and graphic designer in Columbus, recently shared his own version of Google Doodle to highlight Juneteenth, which commemorates the day the last slaves in Texas and more broadly the Confederate South were freed.






    Social media loves Chester's doodle; his tweet of the illustration garnered 40,000 retweets and 95,000 likes as of Thursday afternoon.



    [Google redeemed itself last year. See #4343 posted here June 17, 2021. 9A]
    Last edited by 9A; 06-19-2021 at 02:56 AM.

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