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Thread: Google doodles

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    18 September 2013

    203rd anniversary of the First Government Assembly in Chile


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    18 September 2014

    204th anniversary of the First Government Assembly in Chile





    Enjoy an “empanada al horno” to mark Chilean National Day. On this day in 1810, the Chilean National Government held its first assembly, a pivotal step in the country's fight for independence.

    An empanada is a dish of Spanish cuisine, a type of baked or fried turnover consisting of pastry and filling, common in Spanish, other Southern European, Latin American, and the Philippine cultures. The name comes from the Galician verb empanar, and translates as "enbreaded", that is, wrapped or coated in bread. They are made by folding dough over a filling, which may consist of meat, cheese, tomato, corn, or other ingredients, and then cooking the resulting turnover, either by baking or frying.



    Empanadillas from Spain
    Last edited by 9A; 12-06-2021 at 08:07 PM.

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    18 September 2021

    Chile National Day 2021





    On this date in 1810, Chile’s Primera Junta Nacional de Gobierno [First National Assembly] made the first step toward independence, sparking the start of the Chilean movement to becoming a sovereign nation. Today’s Doodle honors Chile’s National Day or Fiestas Patrias with a depiction of the South American nation’s official animal—the huemul deer.

    Indigenous to the southern Andean regions of Chile and Argentina, the huemul [also known as the South Andean deer] is the rarest mammal found within the Chilean borders. A sighting of one of these elusive creatures in nature is a rare and special occurrence, but it can always be seen on the Chilean Coat of Arms alongside its fellow mountain dweller, the Andean condor.

    Although the wild huemul deer population was estimated to be less than 1,500 in 2019, conservationists in a protected region of the Valdivian Rainforest released the first pair of huemul deer bred in captivity that same year—signifying a critical step for increasing the numbers of this beloved species in its natural habitat.

    Happy National Day, Chile!

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    5 December 2021

    Father's Day 2021 [Thailand]


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    5 December 2015

    Father's Day 2015 [Thailand]



    Happy Father’s Day to dads of all shapes, sizes, and species! Today’s Doodle represents the universality of familial love. I had a few separate concepts, some with animals, some with people, and looking at them all, I thought it would be fun to try to tie them together.


    I was working on Mother’s and Father’s day simultaneously, so it made sense to keep them in a similar style and theme. Plus, once I started coming up with animal-related antics it was hard to stop.





    Once I settled on the concept I did a quick rough pass at animation to make sure it would work visually. I decided to go with a watercolor texture because I think there’s something very comforting and familiar about it, that shows a more human hand.

    Thank you to dads everywhere, for carrying us until we've learned to stand on our own, and sometimes even after.

    Olivia When, Doodler
    Last edited by 9A; 12-07-2021 at 08:21 AM.

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    7 December 2015

    Matilde Pérez's 99th Birthday





    Borrowing ideas from the kinetic style that made Matilde Pérez an internationally recognized artist, Nate Swinehart added some movement to today’s homepage. Born in 1916, Pérez painted and sculpted into her nineties, using the interplay of abstract shapes and sharp colors to create optical and aesthetic effects of motion. Today would have been her 99th birthday. Feliz cumpleaños, Matilde.

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    6 Dec 2015

    Finland National Day 2015




    Today is itsenäisyyspäivä, Finland's Independence Day. Doodler Alyssa Winans and her colleague in Helsinki illustrated today's design with a cozy-looking home flying the siniristilippu [blue-cross flag].

    Many Finns do indeed stay indoors for this holiday: they gather around televisions to watch a national broadcast of Tuntematon sotilas [The Unknown Soldier], a film based on the novel by Väinö Linna. They're also entertained by live coverage of the Independence Day Reception, an annual event at the Presidential Palace that honors veterans and attracts glamorous guests. This year, the chosen theme for the party was "culture". And to that, we raise our glasses. Kippis!

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    6 December 2017

    Finland Independence Day 2017





    December 6 is observed across Finland as Independence Day. This year marks the centennial anniversary of this joyous occasion, adding just a bit more sparkle to traditional celebrations.

    On cold [and sometimes snowy] Independence Day evenings, family and friends come together over warm drinks and sweet treats, tuning in to watch the Annual Independence Day Reception at the Presidential Palace.

    The ones willing to brave the cold outdoors are treated to the best of Finnish culture — hockey games, concerts, art festivals, and celebratory parades. Everywhere you turn, you’re met with infectious enthusiasm and good cheer.

    Today’s Doodle by Helsinki-based illustrator Janine Rewell depicts Finland’s native animals harmoniously gathered on a winter’s night. A single candle burns in the backdrop, just like the candles that light the windows of homes across the country. Captured in the colors of Finland’s national flag, the doodle reflects the spirit of cozy camaraderie and warmth in the snowy cold.

    Hyvää itsenäisyyspäivää, Suomi!

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    8 Dec 2017

    Mother's Day 2017 [Panama]


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    8 December 2015


    Mother's Day 2015 [Panama]


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    9 Dec 2015

    Whina Cooper’s 120th Birthday





    When she was 18, Whina Cooper organized her first demonstration, rallying a small group to protest the leasing of land where the Maori people traditionally fished. When she was close to 80, Cooper led another protest, this time organizing thousands of people on a landmark march from the Far North to Parliament in Wellington to publicly decry the loss of millions of acres of Maori land. Not only did the march unite many different groups--a major feat at the time--, but it also attracted significant national attention, taking public awareness of Maori land rights to new heights.

    Whina Cooper was an activist for most of her life. She fought tirelessly for the rights of Maori people, especially women, serving as the first president of the Maori Women’s Welfare League. In recognition of her efforts, she was made a Dame of the British Empire in 1981, and a member of the Order of New Zealand in 1991. Today, on what would have been her 120th birthday, we honor Dame Whina Cooper with a Doodle that pays tribute to her most historic achievement, that famous land march. Doodler Olivia When took inspiration from photos of the time, highlighting the fact that the march involved people of all ages, all brought together by a passionate and tenacious leader: Whina Cooper.

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    9 December 2018

    Sir Douglas Nicholls’ 112th Birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates Sir Douglas Nicholls, the athlete, pastor, and political leader who championed the upliftment of Australia’s Indigenous people and went on to become the first Aboriginal Australian to be knighted by the Queen of England.

    Born in Yorta Yorta Country, New South Wales, on this day in 1906, Nicholls was raised in Cummeragunga Mission Station, an Aboriginal reserve on the Murray River. After receiving a basic education he worked as a “tar boy,” preparing sheep for shearing, and later joined a dredging team building levees on the river.

    Although he stood just 5’2” Nicholls was a gifted athlete who won various sprinting titles, was an expert boomerang thrower, and who excelled in football. As the first Indigenous Australian to play football professionally, Nicholls endured scorn from teammates and trainers, but eventually found his team and helped the Northcote club reach the grand finals for three seasons—winning the title in 1929.

    Motivated by the founder of the Australian Aborigines’ League, Sir Nicholls got involved in politics and began speaking out for the rights of Indigenous people. “I know we can proudly hold our own with others if given the chance,” Nicholls proclaimed in 1938 at Australia’s first gathering to advance the cause of Aboriginal civil rights.

    In 1940, Nicholls retired as a football player due to knee injuries. Drawn to the church after the loss of his mother, he became the first pastor of Aboriginal Church of Christ in Australia. “Pastor Doug” held regular meetings that led to a thriving community center. He was appointed to a parliamentary committee which investigated abuses towards Indigenous people and edited Smoke Signals, the journal of the Aboriginal Advancement League.

    In 1976 Nicholls was appointed governor of South Australia, becoming the first Indigenous Australian to hold the office. Nicholls was named a Member of the British Empire, Victorian Father of the Year, Order of the British Empire, and in 1972 traveled to London to be knighted by the Queen of England.

    Happy Birthday, Sir Douglas Nicholls!

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    20 December 2010

    Mehmet Akif Ersoy's Birthday




    Mehmet Akif Ersoy [20 December 1873 – 27 December 1936] was a Turkish poet, writer, academic, politician, and the author of the Turkish National Anthem. Widely regarded as one of the premiere literary minds of his time, Ersoy is noted for his command of the Turkish language, as well as his patriotism and role in the Turkish War of Independence.

    A framed version of the national anthem by Ersoy typically occupies the wall above the blackboard in the classrooms of every public as well as most private schools around Turkey, along with a Turkish flag, a photograph of the country's founding father Atatürk, and a copy of Atatürk's speech to the nation's youth.

    A university in Burdur was named after him. Ersoy's portrait was depicted on the reverse of the Turkish 100 lira banknotes of 1983–1989.

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    5 Dec 2019

    Celebrating Wellies





    On the anniversary of the rainiest day in the history of the U.K., today’s Doodle celebrates Wellington boots, or “wellies,” a rainy day staple for centuries. Over the course of 24 hours on this day in 2015, an area of the northwestern county of Cumbria, England, recorded over 34 centimeters [13 inches] of rain. What better way to commemorate this deluge than to pay homage to the wellie, for keeping feet warm and dry during the heaviest downpours?

    Conceived by Arthur Wellesley, the First Duke of Wellington, in the early 1800s, wellies evolved from modified military issue Hessian boots. By asking his London shoemaker to make a shorter boot that would be easier to wear with trousers and to switch from polished to waxed calfskin leather, a stylish waterproof boot was created.

    Named after the Duke, the Wellington boot was further revolutionized with the arrival of vulcanized rubber in the mid-19th century. Rubber’s waterproof capabilities made the wellie a must-have for the typical British weather and its popularity soon spread across the world.

    Today the wellie sparks joy in the hearts of children as they think about all the puddles they can jump in, and can be found in all the colors of the rainbow to make the grayest days bright and cheerful. Hopefully, not as gray and rainy as it was in Cumbria on that record-setting day.

    Rain or shine, have an O so lovely time!

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    5 December 2008

    Santa Claus Day 2008 [Ukraine]



    Saint Nicholas Day, also called the Feast of Saint Nicholas, observed on 5 December or on 6 December in Western Christian countries, and on 19 December in Eastern Christian countries using the old church Calendar, is the feast day of Saint Nicholas of Myra; it falls within the season of Advent. It is celebrated as a Christian festival with particular regard to Saint Nicholas' reputation as a bringer of gifts, as well as through the attendance of church services.

    In the European countries of Germany and Poland, boys have traditionally dressed as bishops and begged alms for the poor. In Poland, children wait for St. Nicholas to come and to put a present under their pillows provided that the children were good during the year. Children who behaved badly may expect to find a twig or a piece of coal under their pillows. In the Netherlands, Dutch children put out a shoe filled with hay and a carrot for Saint Nicholas' horse. On Saint Nicholas Day, gifts are tagged with personal humorous rhymes written by the sender.[8] In the United States, one custom associated with Saint Nicholas Day is children leaving their shoes in the foyer on Saint Nicholas Eve in hope that Saint Nicholas will place some coins on the soles.

    The American Santa Claus, as well as the British Father Christmas, derive from Saint Nicholas. "Santa Claus" is itself derived in part from the Dutch Sinterklaas, the saint's name in that language. However, the gift giving associated with these descendant figures is associated with Christmas Day rather than Saint Nicholas Day itself.
    Last edited by 9A; 12-07-2021 at 09:50 AM.

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    14 Dec 2008

    Shinkansen 2008





    The Shinkansen, colloquially known in English as the bullet train, is a network of high-speed railway lines in Japan. Initially, it was built to connect distant Japanese regions with Tokyo, the capital, to aid economic growth and development. Beyond long-distance travel, some sections around the largest metropolitan areas are used as a commuter rail network. It is operated by five Japan Railways Group companies.

    Over the Shinkansen's 50-plus-year history, carrying over 10 billion passengers, there has been not a single passenger fatality or injury on board due to derailments or collisions.

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    14 December 2012

    Xul Solar's 125th Birthday





    Xul Solar was the adopted name of Oscar Agustín Alejandro Schulz Solari, Argentine painter, sculptor, writer, and inventor of imaginary languages.
    Last edited by 9A; 12-07-2021 at 05:50 PM.

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    7 December 2014

    250th Anniversary of the Hermitage Museum




    The State Hermitage Museum is a museum of art and culture in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It is the largest art museum in the world by gallery space. it was founded in 1764 when Empress Catherine the Great acquired an impressive collection of paintings from the Berlin merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky. The museum celebrates the anniversary of its founding each year on 7 December, Saint Catherine's Day. It has been open to the public since 1852. It attracted 968,604 visitors in 2020, a drop of eighty percent from 2019, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020 it ranked eleventh on the list of most visited art museums in the world.

    Its collections, of which only a small part is on permanent display, comprise over three million items [the numismatic collection accounts for about one-third of them].The collections occupy a large complex of six historic buildings along Palace Embankment, including the Winter Palace, a former residence of Russian emperors. Apart from them, the Menshikov Palace, Museum of Porcelain, Storage Facility at Staraya Derevnya, and the eastern wing of the General Staff Building are also part of the museum. The museum has several exhibition centers abroad. The Hermitage is a federal state property. Since July 1992, the director of the museum has been Mikhail Piotrovsky.

    Of the six buildings in the main museum complex, five—namely the Winter Palace, Small Hermitage, Old Hermitage, New Hermitage, and Hermitage Theatre—are open to the public. The entrance ticket for foreign tourists costs more than the fee paid by citizens of Russia and Belarus. However, entrance is free of charge the third Thursday of every month for all visitors, and free daily for students and children. The museum is closed on Mondays. The entrance for individual visitors is located in the Winter Palace, accessible from the Courtyard.
    Last edited by 9A; 12-07-2021 at 10:01 AM.

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    7 Dec 2014

    Akiko Yosano's 136th Birthday



    Yosano Akiko was the pen-name of a Japanese author, poet, pioneering feminist, pacifist, and social reformer, active in the late Meiji period as well as the Taishō and early Shōwa periods of Japan. Her name at birth was Shō Hō. She is one of the most noted, and most controversial, post-classical woman poets of Japan.

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    7 December 2016

    Abd al-Rahman Al-Sufi's [Azophi] 1113th Birthday



    Abd al-Rahman Al-Sufi forever changed the way we look at the stars in the sky. As one of the world’s most influential astronomers, he dedicated his life to furthering our understanding of the stars and constellations. The lunar crater "Azophi" and the minor planet "12621 Alsufi" are named after him.

    One of Al-Sufi's greatest works involved fact-checking the Greek astronomer Ptolemy's measurements of the brightness and size of stars. In the year 964 AD, Al-Sufi published his findings in a book titled Kitab al-Kawatib al-Thabit al-Musawwar, or The Book of Fixed Stars. In many cases, he confirmed Ptolemy’s discoveries, but he also improved upon his work by illustrating the constellations and correcting some of Ptolemy’s observations about the brightness of stars.

    Today's Doodle celebrates Al-Sufi on what would be his 1,113th birthday with a representation of the constellation Cancer, also known as “the crab.” The artwork closely mirrors what appeared in Al-Sufi’s manuscript, The Book of Fixed Stars.The words around the crabs indicate the cardinal directions of North, South, East, and West, with the smaller labels providing additional assistance in viewing the constellations.

    More than a millennium later, Al-Sufi's keen observations and detailed work still informs our view of the night sky.

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    7 Dec 2016

    181st Anniversary of the Adler's First Run






    All aboard! 181 years ago today, the Adler steam locomotive became the first commercial train to begin operation in Germany on Dec. 7, 1835. Meaning “eagle” in German, the Adler was built and designed in 1835 by Robert and George Stephenson in Newcastle upon Tyne, England for the Bavarian Ludwig Railway.

    Over its 23 years of service, the Adler was used to transport passengers, goods, and cattle 7.45 kilometers [4.66 miles] between Nuremberg and Fürth with a top speed of 65 km/h [40 mph].

    Retired in 1858, the Adler became a national symbol for power and industry. And while the original no longer exists, a working replica is currently on display at the Nuremberg Transport Museum, where it’s occasionally rolled out for exhibitio

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    7 December 2012

    Día de las Velitas



    Little Candles Day [Spanish: Día de las velitas] is a widely observed traditional holiday in Colombia. It is celebrated on December 7 on the eve of the Immaculate Conception, which is a public holiday in Colombia. This day is the unofficial start of the Christmas season in the country.

    On this night, people place candles and paper lanterns on windowsills, balconies, porches, sidewalks, streets, parks and squares; in short, everywhere they can be seen, in honor of the Virgin Mary and her Immaculate Conception. On December 8 it is customary for houses to hoist a white flag with the image of the Virgin Mary all day. They also hold numerous events, from firework shows to competitions.

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    2 May 2016

    Mario Miranda’s 90th birthday





    Mario Miranda was a beloved cartoonist best known for his works in the Times of India and The Illustrated Weekly of India. Based primarily on the bustling cityscape of Mumbai, Miranda’s works often feature complex, multi-layered scenes. Humanity floods the canvas and yet each character maintains their individuality.

    Our guest Doodler today is Aaron Renier, another artist known for portraying large crowds. “I approached Mario’s work by pretending I was drawing with him,” says Renier. “I chose his most popular style, very flat with criss-crossing interactions.” In this homage to Miranda, we see a rich litany of people, each unique in their perspective. “That is what I liked most about his work,” Renier explains, “trying to pick out who knows who, who's watching who, who's annoyed by who, who's enamored by who. Hopefully people will see something of [Miranda’s] spirit in it.”

    Mario Miranda’s works live on throughout India, and on what would have been his 90th birthday, we honor his legacy.

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    2 May 2011

    Hurvinek's 85th Birthday





    Spejbl and Hurvínek is a Czech puppet comedy duo. The characters were conceived by Czech puppeteer prof. Josef Skupa. Throughout the years the two characters have gained international success. They have released many comedy albums, had their own television show and feature film. Each album usually contains one story, about the dim-witted father Josef Spejbl, and his son Hurvínek, who live with another family in the same apartment. Later on, the duo was accompanied by another family, Ms. Kateřina and her daughter Mánička. All four live with the dog Žeryk who has the ability to bark words. Though the comedy is aimed at children, there are several inside jokes that are meant for adults. The duo has their own theatre in Prague, in the district of Dejvice. Besides puppet performances, several stories of Spejbl and Hurvínek were recorded, and one series of so-called večerníček [bedtime stories].

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    2 May 2014

    Ichiyo Higuchi's 142nd Birthday




    Ichiyō Higuchi, real name Natsuko Higuchi was a Japanese writer from the Meiji Period. She was Japan's first professional female writer of modern literature, specialising in short stories and poetry, and also an extensive diarist.

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    2 May 2017

    Israel Independence Day 2017




    Today, Israel celebrates the anniversary of the Israeli Declaration of Independence with a special holiday called Yom Ha'atzmaut. It’s marked by a big ceremony in Jerusalem, where torches signifying the 12 Tribes of Israel are lit by selected citizens who have made a positive impact to society — from arts and culture to humanities and science.

    Of course, there are also fireworks and parties in towns and cities around the country too, with live music, folk dancing and entertainment. Barbeques, known locally as “mangal,” are a popular way for people to celebrate.

    Today’s Doodle was created by guest artist Or Bar-el and shows some typical ways people spend the holiday.

    Happy Independence Day, Israel!

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    5 May 2000

    Google Aliens 2000 - 5


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    May 2000

    Google Aliens 2000 - 4







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    3 May 2000

    Google Aliens 2000 - 3



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    2 May 2000

    Google Aliens 2000 - 2





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    1 May 2000

    Google Aliens 2000 - 1






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    4 May 2010

    Umm Kalthum's Birthday




    Umm Kulthum was an Egyptian singer, songwriter, and film actress active from the 1920s to the 1970s. She was given the honorific title Kawkab al-Sharq [كوكب الشرق, 'Star of the East'].

    She is considered a national icon in her native Egypt; she has been dubbed "The voice of Egypt" and "Egypt's fourth pyramid".







    Umm Kulthum in Life Magazine, 1962




    Monument to Umm Kulthum in Zamalek, Cairo;
    it is located on the site of the singer's former house
    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 09:30 AM.

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    4 May 2012

    Keith Haring's 54th Birthday





    In the early 1980s, as a native Manhattanite raised by and among artists, I was aware of Keith Haring and his work, but my 1984 job interview would be the first time we would meet. After some awkward small talk, we quickly realized that we had many friends and social activities in common. At that age [we were both just 25], such things meant a great deal. He hired me as his personal assistant and studio manager, and I worked alongside him until his premature death from AIDS-related illnesses in 1990. We shared many interests, worked well together, and established a deep, reciprocal trust. When he became ill and decided to create the Keith Haring Foundation, I was honored to accept his offer to be its executive director. I have now held that position for 23 years, and my responsibility and privilege is to promote and manage a legacy: respecting past connections and relationships, cultivating and nurturing new ones, staying true to Keith's artistic and philanthropic goals, and doing whatever is needed to ensure his place in history.

    Keith tapped into the collective unconscious and expanded upon a universal language of symbols and messages – executed in simple lines, energized by the spirit [and for a time, context] of graffiti and fueled by his intense commitment to make his work as accessible as possible. Although he first came to the public’s attention through his chalk drawings in the New York City subway stations, he utilized the same graphically compelling visual vocabulary in thousands of works on paper, canvas, limited edition prints and multiples, sculpture, public murals and, eventually, merchandise – avenues of dissemination that to him were all of equal importance. This ambitious, populist spirit and prolific output brought his work to the widest audience imaginable.

    Curious and cautious about the role technology was beginning to play in our society, Keith often included

    images of computers in his work. He was both excited by and nervous about the impact of the personal computer on our daily lives. Using his art to convey these and other social concerns was at the root of his ever-increasing popularity. Over the past 30 years, images he created that speak about racism, drug addiction, AIDS and tolerance have become iconic.

    Keith once expressed his fantasy that in the future, his images might be "beamed" around the world in seconds. That future is now, and I firmly believe that for Keith, the Internet would have been a realization of that excitement and cautious curiosity. That the world’s largest search engine is honoring Keith's birthday is nevertheless a perfect, 21st century, tribute to his art and ambitions. As Keith himself said in 1984, "Art lives through the imaginations of the people who are seeing it. Without that contact, there is no art. I have made myself a role as an image-maker of the twentieth century and I daily try to understand the responsibilities and implications of that position. It has become increasingly clear to me that art is not an elitist activity reserved for the appreciation of a few, but for everyone, and that is the end toward which I will continue to work."

    Julia Gruen, Executive Direct of the Keith Haring Foundation



    Tower [1987] mural at Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris, France



    The Boxers [1987] sculpture in Berlin, Germany



    Barking dog sculpture by Haring in Dortmund, Germany



    Tuttomondo
    [1989] mural at the church of Sant'Antonio Abate in Pisa, Italy




    Haring painting a mural at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1986


    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 08:52 AM.

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    4 May 2014

    Audrey Hepburn's 85th Birthday




    • Today Audrey Kathleen Hepburn-Ruston would have turned 85. She passed away 21 years ago, on January 20, 1993 at 8pm, at the young age of 63 from a rare type of cancer. Soon after losing her we felt that, would she have had more time on this earth, she would have spent it continuing to speak on the behalf of the millions of children who don’t have a ‘fair start’ in life. This was the generation she worked for tirelessly for the last 5 years of her life as an ambassador for UNICEF. During her tenure [1988-1992] 45,000 of them died of preventable causes each day. Today the number is down to 21,000. She believed in education as a way to change the course of history in those countries that are still developing, which is why we created both the Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund and the Audrey Hepburn Society at the US Fund for UNICEF. Both dedicated to assisting in the survival and development of children in need all over the World of which over 100,000,000, 2/3 of whom are girls, still do not have access to a basic education.

      While she is still remembered as a film actor, she also remains a symbol of both inner and outer elegance for many, her last chapter as a humanitarian forever intertwined with her Hollywood and style legacies. This truly brings home the concept that it is not what you wear but how you wear it – not what you say but how you say it - as she always used to say, “it’s not just the words but it’s also the ‘tune’ that counts”. “Put yourself in the other person shoes” was also one of her motos. This is how she reached the inner core of the roles she played and probably what also made her humanitarian missions so unbearably vivid. She could feel their pain.

      What is extraordinary about this last chapter of her life is that she truly was a ‘sprite’ – youthful at heart and fun to the core - which is probably why she has successfully communicated with our youth. Today they represent more than half of her fan base. And it is this same generation that wishes to find a way to be an active player in ‘changing the World.’ In time, they will cause the way we look at business – at profit – to change. Rather than having separate ‘for profit’ and ‘nonprofit’ activities, they will cause the two to merge into one, thus giving the possibility for all to do what they love while doing something that enhances society as a whole.

      Thank you to all of you who have kept her ‘story’ alive. In the end this is who & what she was… a great story teller. Whether on the silver screen or on a UNICEF podium fighting for the survival of millions or wearing the iconic ‘little back dress’ or smiling at you from a poster on your cupboard door… her story of feelings and emotions, style and grace, elegance and compassion lives on thanks to your affection.

      Sean Hepburn Ferrer


    • About the creative


      Finding the right solution for someone as timeless as Audrey proved a tricky task. Not only was she a classically beautiful actress, she also dedicated her life to philanthropy. I wanted to show both sides of her life's work.


      It was easy to find inspiration for her portrait in Yousuf Karsh's photograph from 1956, used with permission from the estate of Yousuf Karsh. The black and white image is graceful and understated yet immediately recognizable. Taking cues from Audrey's movie posters and work with charities, I added a graphic splash of pink and figures of her dancing with and embracing children.


      Moreover, as a style icon, Audrey inspired many exploration sketches from several members of the doodle team. Below are some of my early concepts and versions of Audrey amongst the doodlers.




    • posted by Jennifer Hom
    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 09:09 AM.

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    4 May 2016

    Jane Jacobs’ 100th birthday



    Happy Birthday Jane Jacobs!

    “Why have cities not, long since, been identified, understood and treated as problems of organized complexity?”




    Jane Jacobs was a self-taught journalist and community organizer that supported keeping the city of New York diverse in shape and function. She stood by beloved neighborhoods that were unjustly slated for "renewal" and revealed political biases in the permit process for new projects. In Jacob's opinion, cities are for the people, and they're safest when residents mingle on the street and in local businesses.





    Jacobs developed her philosophy through living and interacting with the city itself, and described life on the city streets as a kind of social ballet. Her book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities [1961] still sits in the American Library of Congress. Today's Doodle honors the 100th birthday of this fierce protector of New York City's urban landscape.
    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 09:14 AM.

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    4 May 2019

    Eddie Aikau’s 73rd Birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates Eddie Aikau, big wave surfer, lifeguard, and enduring symbol of Hawaiian heritage. Born on the island of Maui on this day in 1946, Eddie moved to Oahu with his family in 1959 and went on to become the first lifeguard hired by Honolulu officials to work on the North Shore of the island.

    Not a single life was lost while he served as a lifeguard at Waimea Bay, making some 500 rescues without the assistance of a jet ski or any modern equipment. Eddie was famous for making rescues even in surf that reached 30 feet high. His fearlessness went on to inspire the slogan “Eddie would go.”

    Hailing from a surfing family, Eddie was one of the first native Hawaiians to win the prestigious Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Surfing Championship in 1977, just four years after his older brother Clyde, who was the very first. Aside from his distinguished surfing career, Eddie found other ways to represent the culture of his native island. In 1978, Eddie joined the crew of the Hokule'a, a historically accurate double-hulled canoe retracing the ancient Polynesian migration route to Hawaii. The vessel sprung a leak and capsized in rough waters. Eddie was last seen heroically paddling off on his surfboard towards the nearest island to seek help for the crew, who were later rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard.

    Today, Eddie’s legacy lives on through the Eddie Aikau Foundation as well as the prestigious Eddie Aikau Invitational, which has seen some of big-wave surfing’s greatest names competing with maximum respect for the authenticity of surf culture.

    Here’s to you, Eddie.


    Special thanks to the Eddie Aikau Foundation for their partnership on this Doodle. Below, they share their thoughts on Eddie’s life, legacy, and the Doodle:
    A legendary surfer and lifeguard for the City & County of Honolulu, Eddie Aikau was one of the greatest big wave riders in the world. As the first lifeguard ever stationed at Waimea Bay on the North Shore of Oahu, Eddie is credited with saving the lives of hundreds of swimmers and surfers, often in conditions no one else would dare enter. His legacy lives on with a memorial Big Wave Surfing Invitational, also known as"The Eddie," held annually at Waimea Bay—but only when the waves are over 20 feet high. We hope people enjoy this Google Doodle and take a moment to remember and celebrate Eddie, a true symbol of the "Aloha Spirit."




    As a nod to Hawaiian culture, today's Doodle was carved out of wood—with a laser! The frames were then organized digitally to create the animated GIF.


    Check out some of the behind-the-scenes below!

    Laser engraving


    Laser cutting


    The finished wood carving!





    First draft of the wood carving animated GIF



    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 09:47 AM.

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    4 May 2021

    Geta Brătescu’s 95th birthday






    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Bucharest-based guest artist Irina Selaru, celebrates multidisciplinary Romanian artist Geta Brătescu on her 95th birthday. Credited as one of the first conceptual artists in Romania, Brătescu rose to international prominence with a series of exhibitions celebrating her prolific career in the 80s.

    Georgeta Ann Comanescu was born on this day in 1926, north of the capital city of Bucharest in Ploiești, Romania. She worked as a children’s book illustrator in the 1950s, and later in the decade joined the Union of Fine Artists, a state organization through which she travelled the country to sketch Romanians in their everyday lives. A testament to her talent in design, in the early ‘60s she was named the artistic director of the prestigious literary magazine Secolul 20.

    But it was in the studio that Brătescu created much of her best-known work across a variety of mediums, including drawing, photography, film, and collages of commonplace materials. She was known for tackling themes like the relationship between art and life with a characteristic dry humor, though she frequently resisted categorization of her work. In 1978, Brătescu opened up her space and process to the world in one of her most famous works, the meta black-and-white film, “Atelierul” [“The Studio”].

    In 2017, at the twilight of her seven-decade-long career, Brătescu was given the honor to represent Romania at the prestigious Venice Biennale, and in the same year she was awarded the Ordinul Naţional “Steaua României” [National Order of the “Star of Romania”], the country’s highest civilian honor.

    Here’s to an artist who refused to color within the lines–happy birthday, Geta Brătescu!

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    4 May 2021

    Celebrating Hisaye Yamamoto




    In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, today’s Doodle celebrates Japanese-American short story author Hisaye Yamamoto, among the first Asian Americans to receive post-war national literary recognition. Throughout an acclaimed career, Yamamoto constructed candid and incisive stories that aimed to bridge the cultural divide between first and second-generation Japanese-Americans by detailing their experiences in the wake of World War II.

    Born on August 23, 1921, in Redondo Beach, California, Hisaye Yamamoto was the daughter of Japanese immigrant parents. In her teens, Yamamoto wrote articles for a daily newspaper for Japanese Californians under the pen name Napoleon. Following the outbreak of World War II and due to Executive Order 9066, Yamamoto’s family was among the over 120,000 Japanese-Americans forced by the U.S. to relocate to government prison camps [aka Japanese internment camps], where they faced violence and harsh conditions. Despite the injustices encountered daily, she kept her literary aspirations alive as a reporter and columnist for the “Poston Chronicle,” the camp newspaper.

    As the dust settled from the war’s end, Yamamoto was released from the internment camp and returned to the Los Angeles area in 1945. Yamamoto soon found work as a columnist with the “Los Angeles Tribune,” a weekly Black-owned and founded newspaper that sought to diversify the voices in journalism and unify the Angelo Black community with Asian Americans.

    Over the next three years gathering news for the publication, Yamamoto witnessed firsthand the widespread racism that many underrepresented groups faced. These experiences profoundly changed Yamamoto, who became a literary champion of not just the Asian American community, but for others who also endured discrimination. In 1948, Yamamoto published her first short story, “The High Heeled Shoes,” which inspired Yamamoto to leave journalism and pursue writing full-time, often exploring topics related to the intersection of gender, race, and ethnicity in her works.

    The adversity she overcame at the prison camp formed the basis for much of Yamamoto’s work, such as her 1950 short story “The Legend of Miss Sasagawara.” She also remained a life-long advocate in the fight against war, racism, and violence. In 1986, Yamamoto’s storytelling won the Before Columbus Foundation’s American Book Award for Lifetime Achievement for her contributions to American multicultural literature.

    Here’s to you, Hisaye Yamamoto!

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    8 May 2021

    Parents' Day 2021 [South Korrea]



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    17 October 2018

    Chiquinha Gonzaga’s 171st Birthday



    Born on this day in Rio de Janeiro in, 1847, Francisca Edwiges Neves Gonzaga [famously known as Chiquinha Gonzaga] showed an affinity for music from childhood. Playing the piano by age 11, she studied music with the maestro Elias Álvares Lobo. When she was 16, her parents insisted she enter an arranged marriage, which ended after her husband insisted she devote herself either to him or to music. At a time when independent women faced major social pressure, Gonzaga sacrificed everything to follow her musical ambitions. She would go on to become the first female conductor in South America and one of the most important figures in Brazilian music history.

    For a woman to make a living as a professional musician in nineteenth-century Brazil was unheard of, but Gonzaga persisted, composing 77 operettas and more than 2,000 songs. “Atraente,” published in 1881, may be her best-loved composition, ushering in a sound that would come to be known as “choro.” With her peerless piano skills and gift for improvisation, Gonzaga pioneered this upbeat blend of jazz, waltz, polka, and Afro-Brazilian beats.

    On January 17, 1885, Gonzaga made her debut as a conductor with her piece, “Palhares Ribeiro, A Corte na Roça.” Despite the popularity of her music, Gonzaga faced resistance as a woman in a male-dominated business. Often performing with a group headed by her close friend, the flutist Joaquim Antônio da Silva Callado Jr., and including her son João Gualberto on clarinet, Gonzaga managed to thrive in the face of adversity, inspiring others to follow in her footsteps.

    During the late 1880s Gonzaga threw her support behind the abolitionist movement, selling her sheet music to raise funds, she paid for the freedom of the enslaved musician Zé Flauta. Her 1899 Carnival march “O abre alas!” [Open Wings] was an homage to freedom. In 1917 she co-founded the artists’ rights society SBAT to ensure that songwriters received a fair share of income from their compositions.

    Gonzaga’s legacy lives on as one of Brazil’s most celebrated musical legends. She broke down barriers and directly impacted the development of music in her homeland. Fittingly, Gonzaga’s birthday is now the official National Day of Brazilian Popular Music [Dia da Música Popular Brasileira].


    Feliz aniversário Chiquinha Gonzaga!



    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 02:36 PM.

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    17 October 2019

    Children's Day 2019 [Philippines]




  42. #8942
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    5 May 2017

    Children's Day 2017 [Japan]






    Celebrating all boys and girls, Children’s Day became an official holiday in Japan in the late 1940s. There are lots of ways to have fun, and it’s not unusual to see carp kites called “koinobori” flying from poles. These brightly colored banners were adopted from an ancient boy’s holiday originally held on the same date, called “Tango no Sekku”, and come from a legend which tells the story of a fish that becomes a dragon – representing perseverance and success.

    Happy Children’s Day!

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    24 November 2019

    195th Anniversary of Las Piñas Bamboo Organ




    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 195th anniversary of the Las Piñas Bamboo Organ, the oldest, largest, and only known bamboo pipe organ in existence. Constructed over 8 years with 1,031 pipes, 902 of which are made of native bamboo, the Bamboo Organ of St. Joseph Parish Church in Las Piñas, Manila, was completed in 1824 under the direction of Spanish missionary Fray Diego Cera de la Virgen del Carmel. The organ is still operational and has been playing daily for nearly 45 years since its reconstruction.

    In the 1880s, natural disasters severely damaged the instrument, silencing it until a restoration project started in 1972. The organ was moved from Las Piñas to Bonn, Germany, where it underwent a full reconstruction, returning to the island in 1975. The homecoming celebrations morphed into the International Bamboo Organ Festival, held every February. On this day in 2003, the Bamboo Organ was named a National Cultural Treasure by the National Museum of the Philippines.

    The Bamboo Organ Foundation oversees the annual celebrations where some of the most famous organists from around the world have come to perform. In the 44 years since the return to Las Piñas, the organ and festival in its honor have become synonymous with Filipino cultural expression.

    A monument to sustainable building and technological sophistication, the Bamboo Organ stands as a symbol of what’s possible when design draws from native resources, labor, and the ingenuity of its nation’s people.

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    24 Nov 2019

    Parveen Shakir’s 67th Birthday





    “Give him a chance to come to grow a blossom in my heart, Let him come to wound my heart once more! Give scent a chance to alert in my unfilled entryways, Let him come to enrich my home. Around here, live many individuals he knows, Cannot he go under the affectation of meeting another person?”

    –Parveen Shakir, “Let Him Come to Sprout a Flower in my Heart”


    Today’s Doodle celebrates the pioneering Pakistani poet Parveen Shakir on her 67th birthday. The release of her first collection of poems titled Khushbu [Fragrance] won her the Adamjee Literary Award in 1976, and her distinguished contributions to Urdu poetry awarded her one of the highest civil prizes in Pakistan, the President’s Award for Pride of Performance in 1990.

    An exceptionally accomplished student, Shakir was awarded a Master’s Degree in English Literature, Linguistics, Bank Management, a Ph.D. in Bank Administration, as well as a Master’s in Public Administration from Harvard. Professionally, Shakir was a long-time university English teacher and later found herself working for the Civil Service, climbing the ranks to become the second secretary of the Federal Bureau of Revenue of Pakistan.

    Throughout her decorated career, Shakir continued to publish notable books of her poetry, including Sad-barg [Marsh Marigold], Khud Kalami [Talking To Oneself], Inkaar [Denial], Kaf-e-Aina [The Mirror’s Edge], and Mah-e-Tamaam [Full Moon], as referenced to the Doodle art.

    Writing from a young woman's perspective, Shakir broke the male-dominated mold of the time by being the first poet to use the Urdu word larki [girl] in her work, defying tradition by candidly expressing the female condition emotionally and realistically.

    The Parveen Shakir Trust was organized in 1994. The trust holds the Parveen Shakir Urdu Literature Festival, which aims to foster the next generation of Urdu literary figures.
    Last edited by 9A; 12-08-2021 at 05:31 PM.

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    24 November 2018

    Charles-Michel de l'Épée’s 306th Birthday



    Today’s Doodle honors the Abbé Charles-Michel de l'Épée, a French educator who founded the first public school for the deaf. Dispelling the misconception that people with impaired hearing were incapable of learning, Épée developed a visual method that became the blueprint for the teaching of the deaf in France and that changed countless lives at a time when many deaf people were discriminated against.

    "Every deaf-mute sent to us already has a language," he wrote. "He is thoroughly in the habit of using it, and understands others who do. With it he expresses his needs, desires, doubts, pains, and so on, and makes no mistakes when others express themselves likewise.”

    Born in Versailles on this day in 1712, Épée was the son of an architect who studied theology and law before devoting his life to serving the poor. He began tutoring two deaf sisters who lived in the slums of Paris and who communicated through their own sign language. In 1760, he used his own inheritance to found the Institution Nationale des Sourds-Muets à Paris, a school for the deaf that was open to all regardless of their ability to pay.

    The French National Assembly eventually recognized him as a "Benefactor of Humanity" and asserted the rights of deaf people under France’s Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. His school went on to receive government funding and remains open to this day renamed as Institut National de Jeunes Sourds de Paris.

    Happy Birthday, Charles-Michel de l'Épée!

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    16 December 2020

    Marie Popelin’s 174th birthday


    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Belgium-based guest artist Emilie Timmermans, celebrates Belgian educator and feminist icon Marie Popelin, the first woman to attain a law degree in the country. Despite her qualifications, she was denied admission to the bar on the basis of her gender, a result she challenged unsuccessfully in court. This injustice, which became known as the “Popelin Affair,” helped to energize Belgium’s burgeoning feminist movement, and Popelin became a leading pioneer in the struggle for gender equality.

    Marie Popelin was born on this day in 1846 in Brussels, Belgium. She initially pursued a career in education and went on to teach at Belgium’s first secondary school for girls, Cours d’Education pour Jeunes Filles [Education Course for Young Girls]. But at age 37, she had a change of heart and decided to study law instead.

    Popelin broke new ground for women in Belgium when she graduated summa cum laude with a law degree from the Université libre de Bruxelles [ULB] in 1888. However, she was denied admittance to the bar association, preventing her from practicing law. Galvanized by her unjust exclusion, in 1892 Popelin co-founded the Ligue belge du droit des femmes [Belgian League for Women's Rights], the country’s first structured feminist organization. She traveled the world to support women’s rights and in 1905 established the Conseil National des Femmes Belges [National Council of Belgian Women], which served to unify feminist groups from across the country.

    Thanks in no small part to Popelin’s tireless efforts, Belgium finally allowed women to practice law in 1922.

    Happy birthday to a trailblazer who opened the door for generations of women in law.

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    14 December 2015

    BKS Iyengar’s 97th Birthday



    B.K.S. Iyengar, it’s been said, could hold a headstand for nearly half an hour well into his eighties. He was instrumental in bringing yoga to the West, beloved by followers on nearly every continent [certainly a few of his techniques have reached a base camp somewhere in Antarctica, but we couldn’t be sure] and advised such aspiring yogis as Aldous Huxley, Sachin Tendulkar, and Queen Elizabeth of Belgium. His style--Iyengar Yoga--is characterized by tremendous control and discipline, which he exercised in ways not limited to confoundingly long headstands.

    To remember the pioneering and deeply spiritual yogi on what would have been his 97th birthday, Kevin Laughlin used a few of the master’s poses, or asanas, to help complete the logo on today’s homepage.

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    27 Nov 2018

    Fe del Mundo’s 107th Birthday




    “I’m glad that I have been very much involved in the care of children, and that I have been relevant to them,” says Filipina physician Fe del Mundo. “They are the most outstanding feature in my life.”

    Born in Manilla on this day in 1911, del Mundo was inspired to study medicine by her older sister who did not herself live to realize her dream of becoming a doctor. Also known as “The Angel of Santo Tomas,” del Mundo devoted her life to child healthcare and revolutionized pediatric medicine in the process.

    A gifted student who became the first woman admitted to Harvard Medical School, del Mundo returned home after completing her studies in the U.S. During World War II, she set up a hospice where she treated more than 400 children and later became director of a government hospital. Frustrated with the bureaucracy, she eventually sold her house and belongings to finance the first pediatric hospital in the Philippines. Del Mundo lived on the second floor of the Children's Medical Center in Quezon City, making early morning rounds until she was 99 years old, even in a wheelchair.

    When she wasn’t treating patients she was teaching students, publishing important research in medical journals, and authoring a definitive ‘Textbook of Pediatrics.’ She established the Institute of Maternal and Child Health to train doctors and nurses, and became the first woman to be conferred the title National Scientist of the Philippines and received many awards for her outstanding service to humankind.

    Happy Birthday, Fe del Mundo!

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    27 Nov 2018

    Léonard Tsuguharu Foujita’s 132nd Birthday



    “The reason why I so much enjoy being friends with cats is that they have two different characters: a wild side and a domestic side. This is what makes them interesting,” said Léonard Tsuguharu Foujita. “A cat’s a wild animal, and I like that.”

    Born in Tokyo on this day in 1886, Foujita, the son of a Japanese army general,dreamed of becoming a painter in Europe. After graduating from art school in Japan, he relocated to France in 1913, where he befriended various School of Paris luminaries such as Juan Gris, Pablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse, and even studied dance with Isadora Duncan.

    Foujita’s first solo exhibition at the prestigious Gallery Chéron in June 1917 sold out quickly. The exhibition consisted of watercolors painted with a fine brush in a distinctive style that blended Eastern and Western influences and finished with a silvery wash.

    Celebrated during his lifetime, Foujita received international awards and prominent commissions. His 1930 Book of Cats, featuring 20 etched plate drawings, became one of the most popular cat books ever published. Today, his work can be seen in Kyoto’s National Museum of Modern Art before rotating to the Musée d’Art Moderne de la ville de Paris in early 2019.

    In 2011 his estate established the Foujita Foundation which carries on his legacy by the supporting artistic projects of young people experiencing difficulties from an interdisciplinary approach while encouraging educational development, cultural openness, and personal fulfillment.

    Happy Birthday, Léonard Tsuguharu Foujita!

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    27 November 2016

    100th Anniversary of “Pelo Telefone”





    The first samba ever recorded, Pelo Telefone began dancing its way into Brazilian hearts 100 years ago today. With a name meaning “on the telephone,” the upbeat number was an ode to new technologies, written by Ernesto dos Santos [better known as Donga] and Mauro de Almeida. Because it was first conceived at the home of Tia Ciata where musicians often participated in rodas de samba, or group improvisations, many others tried to claim authorship of the tune. But it was Donga who registered the sheet music at the National Library of Brazil on November 27, 1916.

    Soon after, the song was recorded by the Brazilian singer Baiano and released by Odeon Records. Up to that point, most people didn’t know what samba was. That all changed as Pelo Telefone’s popularity skyrocketed. Suddenly, the playful style of music was at the center of Carnaval celebrations and eventually, at the forefront of Brazilian culture. Much of the genre’s success can be credited to Donga, who continued to perform and record music for much of his life. In today’s Doodle, the legendary musician shows off his moves as we groove to his famous composition.

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