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Thread: Google doodles

  1. #5751
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    October 22, 2018
    Varvara Stepanova’s 124th Birthday




    A poet, painter, photographer, and designer of books, magazines, posters, stage scenery, textiles and clothing, Stepanova defied societal norms of “women’s work” as she and other members of the Russian Constructivist movement subverted the notion of art as a rarified activity for elites and intellectuals.

    Born in Kovno, Lithuania, on this day in 1894, Stepanova was raised in a peasant family before enrolling in the renowned Kazan art school in Odessa in 1910, a time of great creative and political upheaval in Russia.

    In 1918, she published a series of books containing her “nonobjective visual poetry” whose words were chosen for sound and shape as much as meaning. By the 1920s she found herself at the forefront of the Russian avant-garde, co-founding the Constructivist movement along with her partner Aleksandr Rodchenko and such distinguished colleagues as Kasimir Malevich, Vladimir Tatlin, and Lyubov Popova.

    In 1922 Stepanova created the sets for Aleksandr Vasilyevich Sukhovo-Kobylin’s play The Death of Tarelkin. Her clothing designs, using geometric shapes and utilitarian designs suited to particular activities fell into two broad categories: prozodezhda, or production clothing—which provided peasants, industrial workers, and theatrical performers alike with modern stylish and functional garments—and sportodezhda or sports costumes, which were designed to highlight the athletic body in motion. All of her clothing designs pioneered what is now known as “unisex” fashion.

    Along with Popova she designed textiles at Tsindel, the state textile factory, using overlapping geometric shapes to create complex patterns in what many considered a lesser art form, later becoming a professor of textile design. Although wartime shortages prevented many of these groundbreaking designs from being realized, Stepanova’s vision and legacy lives on.

    C Днём рождения, Varvara Stepanova!

  2. #5752
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    October 22, 2020
    Ivan Bunin's 150th Birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 150th birthday of Russian poet, novelist, and translator Ivan Bunin, who in 1933 became the first Russian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. Widely acclaimed for his rare mastery of both prose and poetry, Bunin carried the tradition of classical Russian literature into the 20th century, establishing his legacy as one of the nation’s most revered stylists of his time.

    Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin was born on this day in 1870 in the western Russian city of Voronezh. He grew up with a passion for painting—an early creative expression he later credited as an influence on his writing style. Bunin began to publish poetry and stories as a teenager, leading to the 1891 release of his first book, “Stikhotvoreniya: 1887–1891” [“Poetry: 1887–1891”].

    In 1901, Bunin won the prestigious Academy of Sciences’ Pushkin Prize for his book of poetry titled “Listopad” [“Falling Leaves,” 1901]. Around this time he began to turn his focus towards prose, establishing himself as one of Russia’s most popular writers. Known for his understated and musical writing style, Bunin went on to craft vivid portraits of Russia through works like “Derévnya” [“The Village,” 1910], the autobiographical novel “Zhizn Arsenyeva” [“The Life of Arseniev,” 1930], his diaries “Okayánnye Dni” [“Cursed Days: A Diary of Revolution,” 1936], and the book of short stories “Tyomnye allei” [“Dark Avenues,” 1943].

    An opponent of the Russian Revolution, Bunin left the country in 1920, ultimately settling in France, where he continued to publish novels and poetry for the rest of his life.

    Happy birthday, Ivan Bunin!

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    March 26, 2020
    Bangladesh Independence Day 2020






    Home to the Sundarbans [the world’s largest mangrove forest], as well as Cox’s Bazar [the world’s longest stretch of beach], the People’s Republic of Bangladesh celebrates its independence today.

    An autonomous republic, the nation formerly known as East Pakistan, became Bangladesh 49 years ago. The country then adopted the Shapla or water lily, depicted in the Doodle artwork, as its national emblem and flower.

    In honor of the country’s freedom, the Bangladeshi flag proudly flies atop many of its buildings. Featuring a red disk against a green backdrop, the flag of Bangladesh represents the sun rising across the nation’s abundant flora and natural beauty.

    Happy Independence Day, Bangladesh!

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    March 26, 2018
    45th Anniversary of the Chipko Movement








    Embrace the trees and
    Save them from being felled;
    The property of our hills,
    Save them from being looted.

    These words are from a poem by Ghanasyam Raturi, an Indian poet writing about the Chipko movement in the 1970s to protect the regional forests in Uttar Pradesh [Uttrakhand]. The success of this nonviolent, grassroots resistance was felt around the globe, serving as the inspiration for future environmental movements. The Chipko Andolan also stands out as an eco-feminist movement. Women formed the nucleus of the movement, as the group most directly affected by the lack of firewood and drinking water caused by deforestation.

    The original Chipko movement dates back to the 18th century, when a group of 363 people from 84 different villages, led by Amrita Devi, laid down their lives to protect a group of khejri trees that were to be cut down at the order of the maharaja, or king, of Jodhpur. After this event, the maharaja decreed that the trees were to be left standing. The original movement was called "angalwaltha", the Garhwali word for "embrace," as the protesters protected the trees by surrounding them and linking hands, physically preventing the loggers from touching the plants. The movement was later named for the Hindi word “chipko,” which means “to stick.”

    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Svabhu Kohli and Viplov Singh, remembers the modern movement and those involved.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-02-2021 at 09:01 PM.

  5. #5755
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    March 26, 2008
    Parametron Computer





    Parametron is a logic circuit element invented by Eiichi Goto in 1954. The parametron is essentially a resonant circuit with a nonlinear reactive element which oscillates at half the driving frequency. The oscillation can be made to represent a binary digit by the choice between two stationary phases π radians [180 degrees] apart.

    Parametrons were used in early Japanese computers from 1954 through the early 1960s. A prototype parametron-based computer, the PC-1, was built at the University of Tokyo in 1958. Parametrons were used in early Japanese computers due to being reliable and inexpensive but were ultimately surpassed by transistors due to differences in speed.

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    March 26, 2015
    Cricket World Cup 2015 - Semifinals #2 - Australia vs. India




  7. #5757
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    Mar 26, 2015
    Hwang Sun-won’s 100th Birthday






    Hwang Sun-wŏn [March 26, 1915 – September 14, 2000] was a Korean short story writer, novelist, and poet.

    Hwang published his first story in 1937 and continued writing through 1980s; during his long literary career, Hwang Sunwon observed firsthand the suffering of ordinary Koreans under many different forms of oppression: colonialism, ideological strife, Korean War, industrialization, military dictatorships. What he sought to capture was the resilience of the Korean spirit even in times of adversity, rather than the adversity itself, and the discovery of love and goodwill in the most unlikely of circumstances.

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    Mar 27, 2015
    Tashiro Furukawa’s 170th Birthday







    To celebrate Tashiro Furukawa's 170th birthday, students sign "Google" in both his original sign language, and the modern fingerspelling it evolved into.

    Tashiro Furukawa was a pioneer in blind and deaf education in Japan. He was a schoolteacher whose many contributions to education included opening the Blind and Deaf School in 1878, which is still opened to students to this day.

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    March 27, 2019
    Raúl Soldi’s 114th Birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates the Argentinian artist Raúl Soldi, who was born in Buenos Aires on this day in 1905. From painting watercolors and church frescos to designing mosaics, theatrical costumes, stage sets, and even department store windows, his creativity spanned mediums.

    The son of a cellist and opera singer, Soldi was inspired to devote his life to art after traveling through Europe in his youth. He spent five years studying in Milan, supporting himself by making illustrations for advertisements before returning to Argentina where he found work painting sets for the movie studio Argentina Sono Film and designing window displays for Harrod’s. Along the way, he also showed his work in Paris, New York, and San Francisco.

    While studying scenery design in the U.S., Soldi met his future wife, Estela Gaitán, who encouraged him to devote himself to fine art. In 1953, he was commissioned to paint frescoes at the church of Santa Ana in Buenos Aires, followed by the Colón Theater in 1966. He was also commissioned to create mosaics in various churches and public spaces.

    Recognized in his country and globally, a 1992 retrospective at Argentina’s Palais de Glace attracted some 500,000 visitors and his work was honored with an award at the 1958 Biennale of São Paulo, Brazil. His art can be found in many international collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

    Happy 114th Birthday, Raúl Soldi!

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    October 11, 2019
    Maria Firmina dos Reis’ 194th Birthday







    “It is horrible to remember that human creatures treat their fellow men like this,” wrote Brazilian author and educator Maria Firmina dos Reis in her 1859 abolitionist novel, Úrsula. Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Porto Alegre and Berlin-based guest-artist Nik Neves, celebrates the life and work of a black woman who boldly spoke out against slavery at a time when few others would dare.

    Born on the island of São Luís in Maranhão on this day in 1825, not long after Brazil declared independence from Portugal, Maria was the daughter of a black slave and a Brazilian woman. She grew up to become her nation’s first novelist.

    Growing up in her aunt’s house on the mainland, Maria was raised by her mother and grandmother, attaining much of her education at home. Her cousin Sotero dos Reis became a famous writer and teacher, and Maria began teaching primary school at age 22. She eventually founded the country’s first free and mixed school, a radical concept before the passage of the 1888 “Golden Law” ending slavery in Brazil.

    Maria published poetry, essays, stories, and puzzles in local newspapers and journals, as well as composing abolitionist songs. Published under the name Uma Maranhense [“a Maranhão woman”], Úrsula depicted slaves as human beings longing for freedom and exposed the evils of those who profited from the slave trade. Now recognized as the first Afro-Brazilian novel, the pseudonymous work fell into obscurity before being revived in the 1960s. Úrsula has since been reprinted, inspiring a new appreciation for this pioneering thinker and activist.

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    October 11, 2016
    Edgar Negret’s 96th birthday




    Today’s Doodle celebrates Edgar Negret, a Colombian sculptor known for depicting abstract nature scenes out of intricate metalwork. The second "o" in “Google” features some of his signature sculptures.

    In 1957 Negret created one of his most famous sculpture series, “Aparatos mágicos,” or Magical Apparatuses. The magical realism of these sculptures showcase Negret’s style, which would become a major part of Colombia’s fine arts scene.

    Many of Negret’s sculptures can now be found in his hometown of Popayán, Colombia, in the house where he lived, which now serves as the Negret House Museum. On the 96th anniversary of Negret’s birth, we remember his dedication to art, nature, and Colombia.

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    October 11, 2012
    Alicia Moreau de Justo's 127th Birthday





    Alicia Moreau de Justo [October 11, 1885 – May 12, 1986] was an Argentine physician, politician, pacifist and human rights activist. She was a leading figure in feminism and socialism in Argentina. Since the beginning of the 20th century, she got involved in public claims for opening rights for women. In 1902, joined by a fellow activists, she founded the Feminist Socialist Center of Argentina and the Feminine Work Union of Argentina.

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    Oct 15, 2012
    107th Anniversary of Little Nemo in Slumberland







    A true pioneer and master draftsman, Winsor McCay is an artist and visionary. As a storyteller, his imagination reaches beyond the confines of reality and even the technology of his time.

    Among his most famous works is his weekly comic strip "Little Nemo in Slumberland." This series follows the journeys of Nemo through a fantastic dreamworld. Nightly, he finds himself thrown into a topsy turvy, overgrown, and colorful mess that often leaves him tumbling out of bed. McCay's mastery of perspective, bold use of color, and sheer creativeness yield a series that is visually stunning and immersive. Though not popular in its time, "Little Nemo in Slumberland" became celebrated in the mid 20th century. Since its "rediscovery," the comic has inspired artists, feature animated films, and operas. Original pages have also drawn attention at the Louvre in Paris and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

    If drawing painfully intricate comic strips every week isn't enough, McCay is also a pioneer in animation. His short film, "Gertie the Dinosaur" is regarded to have the first character designed for animation with a unique personality. His groundbreaking achievements in animation, art, and storytelling make McCay a perfect candidate for a doodle.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 04:12 AM.

  14. #5764
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    October 15, 2017
    Teachers' Day 2017 [Brazil]




  15. #5765
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    Oct 16, 2019
    Celebrating Wanda Rutkiewicz






    “I adored the physical movement, the fresh air, the camaraderie, and the excitement,” wrote the Polish mountain climber Wanda Rutkiewicz. On this day in 1978, she reached the summit of Mount Everest, becoming the third woman to ascend the world’s highest peak, and the first Pole, male or female. Rutkiewicz would go on to complete seven more 8,000-meter-plus [26,247-foot-plus] climbs, establishing herself as one of the most celebrated climbers in mountaineering history and one of the greatest female climbers of all time.

    Born on February 4, 1943 to a Polish family in the village of Plungiany—now part of Lithuania— Wanda studied electrical engineering at Wroclaw University of Technology. She discovered her passion for climbing by chance after her motorcycle ran out of fuel in 1961. One of the people who stopped to help invited her to join him on a climb of the Falcon Mountains.

    Ten years after reaching the peak of Mount Everest, Rutkiewicz became the first woman to climb K2—the world’s second-highest peak—doing so without using supplemental oxygen. Two of her fellow climbers perished on the descent from K2, but she would continue pursuing her dreams.

    Rutkiewicz published books and produced documentaries about her climbs, but despite her many accomplishments, she found some male climbers to be condescending. She went on to advocate for women’s climbing and to organize several all-female expeditions. In 1990, she declared her goal of climbing eight 8,000-meter-plus [26,247-foot-plus] peaks in just over a year’s time, a program she called the “Caravan of Dreams.” Although she did not complete that particular mission, Wanda Rutkiewicz has continued to inspire generations of climbers to follow in her footsteps.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 09:44 AM.

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    October 16, 2017
    Olaudah Equiano’s 272nd Birthday







    Born in Nigeria, African writer and abolitionist Olaudah Equiano was sold into slavery as a boy. He braved the harsh conditions of the Middle Passage to the Caribbean and lived to tell his story.

    Equiano was a seafarer, often working for captains and merchants. When given the chance to read and write, he learned swiftly. Equiano moved up the ranks, gaining rare promotions to seaman, then merchant. He carefully saved his earnings from side trades over the course of 3 years, eventually earning enough to buy his freedom.

    Once a free man, Equiano published his memoir, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, which became one of the earliest bestsellers by an African author. The book detailed his life, travels, and the slave trade, helping to sway public opinion against slavery. He also founded Sons of Africa, an anti-slavery organization consisting of leaders in London’s black community, and gave lectures to the public and politicians.

    Change due to Equiano’s efforts would come a decade after his death with the passing of Abolition of the Slave Trade Act in 1807.

    As the UK celebrates Black History Month, we wish a Happy 272nd Birthday to Olaudah Equiano!

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    October 16, 2010
    Double Ninth Festival 2010




    The Double Ninth Festival, observed on the ninth day of the ninth month in the Chinese calendar, is a traditional Chinese holiday, mentioned in writings since before the Eastern Han period [before AD 25].

    According to the I Ching, nine is a yang number; the ninth day of the ninth lunar month [or double nine] has too much yang [a traditional Chinese spiritual concept] and is thus a potentially very auspicious date. Hence, the day is also called "Double Yang Festival" [重陽節]. It is customary to climb a high mountain, drink chrysanthemum liquor, and wear the zhuyu [茱萸] plant, Cornus officinalis. [Both chrysanthemum and zhuyu are considered to have cleansing qualities and are used on other occasions to air out houses and cure illnesses.]

    On this holiday some Chinese also visit the graves of their ancestors to pay their respects. In Hong Kong and Macao, whole extended families head to ancestral graves to clean them and repaint inscriptions, and to lay out food offerings such as roast suckling pig and fruit, which are then eaten [after the spirits have consumed the spiritual element of the food]. Chongyang Cake is also popular. Incense sticks are burned. Cemeteries get crowded, and each year grass fires are inadvertently started by the burning incense sticks.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 10:04 AM.

  18. #5768
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    October 16, 2018
    Teachers' Day 2018 [Chile]




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    May 22, 2017
    Richard Oakes’ 75th Birthday






    Throughout the 1960s and 70s, Richard Oakes made a stand for the rights of American Indians. Over his time as an activist, he fought peacefully for freedom, justice, and the right of American Indians to have control over their lands.

    Oakes grew up on the Mohawk Indian reservation in Akwesasne, on the Canadian / New York border. When he was 18, he moved to San Francisco, and enrolled in San Francisco State University shortly after. There, his passion for empowerment through education led him to play an integral role in creating one of the first American Indian studies programs in the nation.

    Oakes went on to be a champion for social justice in his community. His most powerful protest happened in 1969 when he led a group of activists occupying Alcatraz Island. The aim was not only to set up a community, complete with a university, museum and cultural center, but also for the government to acknowledge the rights of American Indians to claim the out-of-use federal land as their own.

    Although Richard didn't succeed in gaining the deeds to Alcatraz for his people, he brought their issues into the media spotlight and made a substantial impact on the treatment of American Indians in the US. He also went on to assist the Pit River Tribe in their claim for land in Northern California.
    Today's Doodle recognizes places that were important in his life's story and mission, depicting the Akwesasne reservation, Alcatraz Island, and Pit River.

    Here's to Richard Oakes, for his unwavering dedication to his community and social justice.

  20. #5770
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    April 1, 2017
    Payut Ngaokrachang’s 88th Birthday








    Today’s Doodle celebrates renowned Thai cartoonist and animation pioneer Payut Ngaokrachang with a depiction of one of his best-known animations, and Thai cinema's first cel-animated feature film, “The Adventure of Sudsakorn.”

    Released in 1979, “Sudsakorn” was one of Thailand’s earliest full-length animations, and was based on author Sudthornpu’s book Pra Apai Manee. It follows the exploits of the boy hero as he battles with mythical creatures and other dangerous adversaries. The animation was created on a very tight budget, and the innovative Payut was said to have crafted some of his movie-making equipment using discarded military machinery to keep costs low.

    On what would be his 88th birthday, we celebrate Payut Ngaokrachang and his significant contribution to animation.

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    April 1, 2020
    Dame Jean Macnamara's 121st Birthday






    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Sydney-based guest artist Thomas Campi, celebrates Australian doctor and medical scientist Dame Jean Macnamara on her 121st birthday. Dr. Macnamara applied her tireless work ethic to better understand and treat various forms of paralysis including polio, and her work contributed to the development of a successful polio vaccine in 1955.

    Annie Jean Macnamara was born in Beechworth, Victoria, Australia on this day in 1899, and as a teenager during World World I felt a strengthened resolve “to be of some use in the world.” Standing just 152cm tall, the forthright Dr. Macnamara proved to be a force to be reckoned with.

    Dr. Macnamara graduated from medical school in 1925, the same year a polio epidemic struck the capital city of Melbourne. As a consultant and medical officer to the Poliomyelitis Committee of Victoria, she turned her focus to treating and researching the potentially fatal virus, a particular risk for children.

    In collaboration with the future Nobel Prize winner Sir Macfarlane Burnet, she discovered in 1931 that there was more than one strain of the poliovirus, a pivotal step towards the development of an effective vaccine nearly 25 years later.

    Dr. Macnamara continued to work with sufferers of the disease—especially children—for the rest of her life, developing new methods of treatment and rehabilitation.

    For her invaluable commitment to children’s lives, she was appointed Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire [DBE] in 1935. During her lifetime, Dr. Macnamara's research also played a major role in the introduction of myxomatosis to control rabbit plagues, minimising environmental damage across Australia.

    Happy birthday, Dame Jean Macnamara!

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    April 9, 2020
    Thank You: Custodial and sanitation workers





    As COVID-19 continues to impact communities around the world, people are coming together to help one another now more than ever.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 02:52 PM.

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    April 9, 2012
    Elias Lönnrot's 210th Birthday




    Elias Lönnrot was a Finnish physician, philologist and collector of traditional Finnish oral poetry. He is best known for creating the Finnish national epic, Kalevala, [1835, enlarged 1849], from short ballads and lyric poems gathered from the Finnish oral tradition during several expeditions in Finland, Russian Karelia, the Kola Peninsula and Baltic countries.

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    April 9, 2021
    Clive Sullivan's 78th Birthday









    Today’s Doodle celebrates the 78th birthday of Welsh-born rugby winger and coach Clive Sullivan, who made history as the first Black captain of any major British sports team when he was selected to lead the country’s national side, the Great Britain national rugby league team, The Lions.

    Clive Sullivan was born on this day in the Splott district of Cardiff, Wales. From a young age, he was drawn to the sport of rugby, often playing in school. By his teenage years, he had suffered various rugby-related injuries that required operations on his knees, feet, and shoulders, leading doctors to state he’d never walk normally again. However, Sullivan refused to let this hold him back and worked to overcome his childhood injuries. At just 17, his perseverance paid off when he accepted a trial for Hull Football Club, whom he impressed so much with his tremendous speed that they signed him as a professional player the very next day.

    Sullivan went on to play over 350 games with Hull FC and over 200 with Hull Kingston Rovers, cementing his status as one of rugby’s most formidable opposition wingers. In 1967, he made his international debut for Great Britain, which granted him his historic captaincy in 1972. After a stint as a coach for Hull FC, the team unexpectedly called him back to compete once again as a player at the age of 39.

    To honor Sullivan, a section of one of Hull’s most prominent roads was renamed Clive Sullivan Way in 1985.

    Happy birthday, Clive Sullivan - Thank you for breaking barriers and opening doors for generations to come.

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    October 8, 2010
    John Lennon's 70th Birthday









    There’s a lot that can be said about John Lennon, one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. Even more can be said about the individual experiences people have had growing up with his music. It seems like everyone has a Lennon story. The earliest memory I have of him is listening to his songs in the backseat of our old station wagon with my brothers, watching my mom and dad sing along on the cassette player. It’s a very simple memory, but rich with subtlety—the sunlight through the windshield, my mom’s smile—and so it’s stuck with me. And maybe that’s what John’s music is about. There’s an earnest simplicity to it, yet I’m sure any one of us, regardless of whether or not we were around during his time, could describe
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 03:23 PM.

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    September 4, 2017
    First Day of School 2017 [France, Poland]







    Today is the first day of school in many countries. And the school of fish in our Doodle is ready to dive into the brainy brine! A whale swims toward the classroom, textbooks in fin. A starfish crams in the remainder of its summer reading, and a turtle and friends embark on their first science project.
    Here's hoping our seagoing scholars inspire you to have a great school year!

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    June 2, 2017
    Gilbert Baker's 66th Birthday







    Today’s doodle is a little more colorful thanks to Gilbert Baker, creator of the rainbow flag, a symbol of pride and freedom for the LGBTQA+ community.

    Teaching himself to sew, Baker put his skills to work for the San Francisco gay community, making banners for marches and protests. In 1978 Baker used those skills to create a new symbol for the LGBT Community to replace the pink triangle, a symbol of oppression and devastation from the Nazi’s classification of LGBT people in World War II. Baker’s Rainbow was a more positive and celebratory symbol.

    “We needed something beautiful, something from us,” Baker explained. “The rainbow is so perfect because it really fits our diversity in terms of race, gender, ages, all of those things. Plus, it’s a natural flag—it’s from the sky!”

    Making the flag was no small task. Baker gathered thirty people in the attic of the Gay Community Center in San Francisco to hand-dye and sew together over 1000 yards of cotton. The modern day rainbow flag features six colors, but the original used eight, each representing a different aspect of the community. The iconic symbol stuck and soon Baker was flooded with requests for more flags.

    Baker’s sister, Ardonna Cook, also reflects on his life and legacy by sharing, “Our family is so proud of the legacy of activism and artistry that Gilbert has left to the world. He touched millions across the globe and empowered them to become stronger and more visible LGBT people. Gilbert led a bold and inspiring life by bringing The Rainbow Flag to life and it is that legacy which should guide us in respecting and celebrating diversity.”


    Early Draft Concept


    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 05:20 PM.

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    August 2, 2018
    Celebrating Mount Olympus









    According to ancient Greek mythology, Mount Olympus is the home of the gods. Should mere mortals dare to climb so high? On this day In 1913, three courageous climbers answered “yes,” scaling this 9,573-foot summit sculpted with deep ravines and abrupt upgrades. Swiss photographer Frédéric Boissonnas, his friend Daniel Baud-Bovy, and Christos Kakkalos, a Greek hunter who served as their guide, set off in treacherous weather.

    Kakkalos knew the mountain so well that he scaled its sharp inclines barefoot. The Swiss had some experience in mountaineering, but Boissonnas had to lug heavy photographic equipment up the mountain. He and his friend, Baud-Bovy, were tied together with a rope, standard procedure for such expeditions.

    During their climb, the summit where Greek gods were said to reside was wreathed with storm clouds, and the climbers mistook a lesser peak for the home of the gods. Thinking their ascent was done, the elated adventurers wrote cards describing their feat and put the notes in a bottle that they buried on a crest they christened Victory Top. When the mist cleared, they spied another, more impressive peak, called Mytikas.

    With Kakkalos in the lead, the men continued upward, scrambling across the slippery gorge. Boissonnas later wrote that he was compelled by the fire of Prometheus, who stole fire from Athena and Hephaestus’ workshop on Mount Olympus, gifting it to humans to help them in their labors.
    Today’s Doodle celebrates their accomplishment and the fire that inspired them.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 05:24 PM.

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    August 2, 2012
    Table Tennis 2012







    Table tennis, also known as ping-pong and whiff-whaff, is a sport in which two or four players hit a lightweight ball, also known as the ping-pong ball, back and forth across a table using small rackets. The game takes place on a hard table divided by a net. Except for the initial serve, the rules are generally as follows: players must allow a ball played toward them to bounce one time on their side of the table and must return it so that it bounces on the opposite side at least once. A point is scored when a player fails to return the ball within the rules. Play is fast and demands quick reactions. Spinning the ball alters its trajectory and limits an opponent's options, giving the hitter a great advantage.

    Table tennis is governed by the worldwide organization International Table Tennis Federation [ITTF], founded in 1926. ITTF currently includes 226 member associations. The table tennis official rules are specified in the ITTF handbook. Table tennis has been an Olympic sport since 1988, with several event categories. From 1988 until 2004, these were men's singles, women's singles, men's doubles and women's doubles. Since 2008, a team event has been played instead of the doubles.

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    December 6, 2018
    Zeki Müren’s 87th Birthday





    Hailed as “The Sun of Art” and the “Pasha of Turkish Music,” Zeki Müren was a singer, composer, actor, and poet who became one of the most important artists in Turkish classical music history.

    Born in the historic Hisar district of Bursa on this day in 1931, Müren was the only child of a Macedonian timber merchant. While a student at the Istanbul State Academy of Fine Arts, he won first place in a contest sponsored by Turkish Radio and Television. In 1951 he gave his first live performance on Istanbul Radio. That same year he recorded “Muhabbet Kuşu” [Parakeet] with clarinetist Sükrü Tunar, the first of hundreds of songs he’d release on phonograph and cassette over the course of his career. His 1955 release “Manolyam” was the first Turkish recording to be certified gold.

    For his first live concert in 1955 Müren took the stage in typical stage clothes, but over time began designing his own wardrobe, expressing a personal style that sometimes included thigh-high boots, sparkling tights, jeweled capes, miniskirts, and a peacock tail—as well as wigs and makeup. His fearlessly flamboyant look became known as a symbol of his strength of character and individuality.
    Müren transcended music by beginning an acting career in the 1950s with a role in the film or Beklenen Sarki “Awaited Song” [1953]. He would go on to appear in 18 films, often composing the scores as well, and played the lead in Robert Anderson’s stage drama Tea and Sympathy [1960].

    In 1991, Müren was named an official State Artist of Tukey. Today, Müren’s legacy lives on through the Zeki Müren Fine Arts Anatolian High School in Bursa, which opened in 2002. His house in Bodrum became the Zeki Müren Art Museum and his Zeki Müren Scholarship Fund has supported thousands of students over the past 20 years.

    Doğum günün kutlu olsun, Zeki Müren!
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 06:30 PM.

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    December 6, 2017
    Finland Independence Day 2017







    December 6 is observed across Finland as Independence Day. This year marks the centennial anniversary of this joyous occasion, adding just a bit more sparkle to traditional celebrations.
    On cold [and sometimes snowy] Independence Day evenings, family and friends come together over warm drinks and sweet treats, tuning in to watch the Annual Independence Day Reception at the Presidential Palace.

    The ones willing to brave the cold outdoors are treated to the best of Finnish culture — hockey games, concerts, art festivals, and celebratory parades. Everywhere you turn, you’re met with infectious enthusiasm and good cheer.

    Today’s Doodle by Helsinki-based illustrator Janine Rewell depicts Finland’s native animals harmoniously gathered on a winter’s night. A single candle burns in the backdrop, just like the candles that light the windows of homes across the country. Captured in the colors of Finland’s national flag, the doodle reflects the spirit of cozy camaraderie and warmth in the snowy cold.

    Hyvää itsenäisyyspäivää, Suomi!

  32. #5782
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    December 6, 2015
    Finland National Day 2015







    Today is itsenäisyyspäivä, Finland's Independence Day. Doodler Alyssa Winans and her colleague in Helsinki illustrated today's design with a cozy-looking home flying the siniristilippu [[blue-cross flag).
    Many Finns do indeed stay indoors for this holiday: they gather around televisions to watch a national broadcast of Tuntematon sotilas [The Unknown Soldier], a film based on the novel by Väinö Linna.

    They're also entertained by live coverage of the Independence Day Reception, an annual event at the Presidential Palace that honors veterans and attracts glamorous guests. This year, the chosen theme for the party was "culture". And to that, we raise our glasses. Kippis!

  33. #5783
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    December 6, 2017
    Elvia Carrillo Puerto's 139th Birthday




    Born on this day in Yucatán in 1878, Elvia Carrillo Puerto, known as The Red Nun, or La monja roja, helped propel feminism to the forefront of Mexican politics in the early 20th century. Poet and early feminist Rita Cetina Gutiérrez taught the young Puerto ideas of equality between the sexes, which would form the framework for Puerto’s lifelong work as a socialist and a feminist.

    As Puerto grew up, she dedicated her life to fixing the injustices caused by gender inequality, founding feminist resistance organizations like the Rita Cetina Gutiérrez League [named for her former teacher and mentor]. These leagues would deliver lectures to the public about women's health and the need for women in government.

    Puerto helped get women the right to vote and be elected in the state of Yucatán. She was elected to the legislature in 1923, continuing to fight for women's rights long after serving in that post. Her work would be influential in the introduction of Mexican women’s suffrage nationally in 1953.

    Mexico City-based illustrator Hilda Palafox created today’s Doodle in solidarity with Elvia Carrillo Puerto on what would be her 139th birthday. Today we honor her activism and advocacy, which have led women all over the world to fight for equality and representation.

    ¡Feliz cumpleaños, Elvia!

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    Dec 16, 2017
    Kazakhstan Republic Day 2017





    For more than a thousand years, nomadic tribes on horseback wandered the expansive steppes and towering peaks of Kazakhstan. In fact, one possible origin for the name Kazakh is the Turkish word qaz, “to wander.”

    Today, the country remains mostly wide open spaces. Golden eagles, important to traditional Kazakh culture and a symbol of national pride, wheel overhead against a bright blue sky. They make their nests on the craggy cliffs of the Alatau and other mountain ranges, as depicted in today’s Doodle.

    Kazakhstan declared independence from the Soviet Union on December 16th, 1991, starting a new chapter in its long history. Anniversary celebrations typically include food, fireworks, and festive clothing. Fancy chapans, or long robes, are sewn with dazzling colors and intricate gold embroidery.

    Traditional music is also a must-have, as an integral part of Kazakhstan’s cultural heritage. Listeners might pick out the dombra and kobyz, amongst other instruments.

    Happy Republic Day, Kazakhstan!

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    April 13, 2018
    Songkran 2018



    Songkran Day is one of the most significant holidays in Thailand. Typically celebrated between April 13th and 15th, it marks the beginning of the Thai New Year. There are many ways to celebrate Songkran Day, but most involve getting very, very wet. Water fights erupt throughout Thai streets, sparing no bystanders.

    Today's Doodle depicts traditional bowls of water infused with flower petals, which are used by participants during various traditions, such as the pouring of water by younger generations into the hands of elders as a sign of respect. Several special guests even peek from under the surface to take part in the day's festivities.

    Happy Songkran, 2018!

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    April 13, 2021
    151st Anniversary of The Metropolitan Museum of Art






    In honor of a storied legacy of cultural enrichment for New Yorkers and international communities alike, today’s Doodle celebrates the 151st Anniversary of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens—businessmen and financiers as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day—who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. On this day in 1870, the museum was officially incorporated and soon after acquired its first work of art: a Roman sarcophagus.

    The Met has come quite a long way from that first showing to become New York’s largest art museum, with a permanent collection of over 1.5 million objects, spanning over 5,000 years from nearly every corner of the globe. A sampling of the many works of art found at The Met today are depicted in today’s Doodle artwork—including a Byzantine floor mosaic from 500-550 A.D., the armor of German Emperor Ferdinand I from the 16th century, an intricate traditional Lakota/Teton Sioux beaded dress, and the painting "Self-Portrait" by Samuel Joseph Brown, Jr. from the 1940s.

    Whether you're a Met regular or planning your first trip to the Museum, be sure to visit a certain blue ceramic hippopotamus from Egypt’s Middle Kingdom nicknamed “William.” An unofficial mascot of The Met, he might soon become your favorite part of the collection.

    Happy anniversary to The Met–and here’s to many more!


    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 08:43 PM.

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    October 14, 2020
    Celebrating Claudia Jones







    Today’s Doodle commemorates Trinidad-born activist, feminist, journalist, orator, and community organizer Claudia Jones. Among her groundbreaking accomplishments, Jones founded and served as the editor-in-chief for the West Indian Gazette and Afro-Asian Caribbean News—Britain’s first, major Black newspaper. Through its global news coverage, the Gazette aimed to unify the Black community in the worldwide battle against discrimination. The publication also provided a platform for Jones to organize Britain’s first Caribbean carnival in 1959, which is widely credited as the precursor to today’s annual celebration of Caribbean culture known as the Notting Hill Carnival. On this day in 2008, Jones was honored with a Great British Stamp in the “Women of Distinction” series to commemorate her lifetime of pioneering activism.

    Claudia Jones was born Claudia Vera Cumberbatch on February 21, 1915 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. At 8 years old, she moved with her family to New York City’s Harlem neighborhood.

    Passionate about writing, Jones contributed to and led a variety of communist publications as a young adult, and she spent much of her adulthood as an active member of the Communist Party USA.

    Throughout her life, Jones tirelessly championed issues like civil rights, gender equality, and decolonization through journalism, community organization, and public speaking. She focused much of her work on the liberation of Black women everywhere from the discrimination they faced due to a combination of classism, racism, and sexism.

    Jones’ political activity led to multiple imprisonments and ultimately her deportation to the U.K. in 1955, but she refused to be deterred. Beginning a new chapter of her life in Britain, she turned particular attention to the issues facing London’s West Indian immigrant community.In an effort to counteract racial tensions, she inaugurated an annual Caribbean carnival, whose spirit lives on today as a symbol of community and inclusion.

    Thank you, Claudia Jones, for your lifelong commitment to a more equitable world.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-03-2021 at 08:48 PM.

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    April 13, 2019
    Songkran 2019







    Marking the beginning of the Thai New Year, today’s Doodle celebrates Songkran, a three-day holiday that has been known to last for a whole week.

    While the original festivities involved sprinkling water on one another for purification, and washing away bad luck for the year to come, Songkran has evolved into one big, joyous national water fight. In Chiang Mai, the action starts a day early with a grand procession around the northern Thai city. The Bangkok street party known as Silom takes place along a 4-kilometer street replete with vendors selling water balloons, squirt guns, street food, and drinks. On the island of Phuket, pickup trucks filled with water throwers patrol the crowded streets near the Patong Beach area, while live music and cultural events take place in Phuket Town’s Saphan Hin Park.

    Songkran is also a time for spring cleaning, spending time with family and loved ones, and paying respect to time-honored cultural traditions.

    Happy Songkran!
    Last edited by 9A; 08-04-2021 at 06:33 AM.

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    March 30, 2019
    María Moliner’s 119th Birthday








    María Moliner devoted her whole life to working with words, and making their power accessible to all. Born in Paniza [a province of Zaragoza] on this day in 1900, the Spanish librarian, philologist, and lexicographer labored single-handedly to create a new kind of reference book, which was hailed as “the most complete, most useful, most accurate, and funniest dictionary of the Spanish language” by novelist Gabriel García Márquez.

    Moliner began working as a librarian at age 22 and was elected head of the University of Valencia library in 1936. She took a special interest in the popular libraries project, developing a plan for Bibliotecas Rurales [Rural Libraries] to help promote literacy and culture. Following the Spanish Civil War, her family was penalized by the new authoritarian government, causing her to be passed over for faculty promotions.

    Moliner began compiling her Diccionario de Uso del Español [Dictionary of Spanish Use] in 1952, working at home before and after her day job. A mother of four as well as a grandmother, she had extraordinary powers of concentration. Moliner would research words read in newspapers or heard on the street, aiming to outdo the dictionary published by the Real Academia Española. “The Academy dictionary is the dictionary of authority,” she once said. “Mine has not had much regard for authority.”
    Instead of alphabetical organization, Moliner’s dictionary was grouped in families of words, offering not only detailed definitions, but also synonyms, and guidance on usage. When she began the project she estimated it would take two years, but the first edition of the two-volume dictionary was not published until 1966—a total of 15 years later!

    Her life inspired a stage drama, The Dictionary, as well as a documentary film, Tending Words. However, the dictionary itself, sometimes referred to as “The María Moliner,” is widely considered her greatest legacy.

    ¡Feliz cumpleaños, María Moliner!

  40. #5790
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    April 22, 2018
    Earth Day 2018





    It is so important in the world today that we feel hopeful and do our part to protect life on Earth. I am hopeful that this Earth Day Google Doodle will live as a reminder for people across the globe that there is still so much in the world worth fighting for...With all of us working together, I am hopeful that it is not too late to turn things around, if we all do our part for this beautiful planet.”- Dr. Jane Goodall

    In 1970, 20 million Americans came together to deliver a message: our environment sustains us, and so we too must work to sustain it. Since then, Earth Day has spawned a movement of millions across the globe working towards a sustainable future. This day of solidarity sheds light on ways everyone can contribute to a better planet.

    Today’s annual Earth Day Doodle was created in partnership with one of the planet’s most influential advocates: Ethologist [animal behavior expert], conservationist, activist, and animal-lover Dr. Jane Goodall, who has dedicated her life to studying and protecting our environment.

    Born April 3, 1934, in London, England, Dr. Goodall always dreamt of living among wildlife in Africa. At 26, she followed her passion for animals and Africa to Gombe, Tanzania, where she began her landmark study of chimpanzees in the wild by immersing herself in their habitat as a neighbor, rather than a distant observer. Her discovery in 1960 that chimpanzees make and use tools rocked the scientific world and redefined the relationship between humans and the rest of the animal kingdom.

    As a UN Messenger of Peace, Dame Commander of the British Empire, and Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute, Dr. Goodall travels the world nearly 300 days a year, speaking about the threats facing chimpanzees, environmental crises, and her reasons for hope.

    In today’s Doodle, Dr. Goodall shares her personal message to the world on Earth Day 2018, including some of her inspiration and what we can all do to have a positive impact on our planet. She shares: “It is so important in the world today that we feel hopeful and do our part to protect life on Earth. I am hopeful that this Earth Day Google Doodle will live as a reminder for people across the globe that there is still so much in the world worth fighting for. So much that is beautiful, so many wonderful people working to reverse the harm, to help protect species and their environments. And there are so, so many young people, like those in JGI’s Roots & Shoots program, dedicated to making this a better world. With all of us working together, I am hopeful that it is not too late to turn things around, if we all do our part for this beautiful planet.”
    Last edited by 9A; 08-04-2021 at 07:36 AM.

  41. #5791
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    September 21, 2015
    Respect for the Aged Day 2015







    Since 1966, Respect for the Aged Day has been a time to revere the wisest people we know. Today Japan celebrates its elders, the men and women who paved the way for their children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to leave their mark on society. Communities across the country will gather to enjoy musical performances and offer their elders gifts like bento boxes, flowers, and handmade crafts.

    The elderly in your community have experiences to share, stories to tell, and wisdom to pass along. Do something nice today for the elders in your community to show your admiration. [Might we suggest volunteering at a senior center near you?]

  42. #5792
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    July 8, 2019
    Celebrating Women's World Cup 2019 Champions: the United States of America








    Congratulations to the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup [Fédération Internationale de Football Association] champions: The United States!

    Over the past month, players from the women's national teams of 24 countries competed for top rank across nine cities in France. Today, the games culminated at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu, a suburb of Lyon, France, where the United States Women’s National Team has won to become the 2019 Women’s World Cup champions!

    This year's Doodle series celebrated the rich cultures and talent of all 24 participating countries by featuring guest artists hailing from each nation. We hope you've enjoyed all 24 Doodles throughout the games, each capturing the local excitement of the World Cup competition as well as what soccer means to the guest artist personally.

    Today's Doodle celebrating the big win is a unique creation by our US-based guest artist Roxie Vizcarra. Read more about the Doodle below.

    Cheers to all the talented players around the world. See you next time!
    Last edited by 9A; 08-04-2021 at 07:43 AM.

  43. #5793
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    Jun 1, 2021
    Children's Day 2021 [June 01]




  44. #5794
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    Jun 2, 2021
    Celebrating Frank Kameny





    In celebration of Pride Month, today’s Doodle honors American astronomer, veteran, and gay rights activist Dr. Frank Kameny, widely hailed as one of the most prominent figures of the U.S. LGBTQ rights movement.

    Franklin Edward Kameny was born in Queens, New York, on May 21, 1925. Gifted from a young age, Kameny enrolled at Queens College to study physics at just 15 years old. He saw combat during World War II and upon his return to the U.S. obtained a doctorate in astronomy at Harvard University. In 1957, Kameny accepted a job as an astronomer with the Army Map Service, but he was fired just months later based on an executive order effectively barring members of the LGBTQ community from federal employment.

    In response to his termination, Kameny sued the federal government and in 1961 filed the first gay rights appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Denied but undeterred, Kameny embarked upon a lifelong fight for equal rights. Years before the Stonewall Riots, he organized one of the country’s first gay rights advocacy groups. In the early ‘70s, he also successfully challenged the American Psychiatric Association’s classification of homosexuality as a mental disorder, and in 1975, the Civil Service Commission finally reversed its ban on LGBTQ employees.

    In 2009, over 50 years after his dismissal, Kameny received a formal apology from the U.S. government. In June 2010, Washington D.C. named a stretch of 17th Street NW near Dupont Circle “Frank Kameny Way” in his honor.

    Thank you, Frank Kameny, for courageously paving the way for decades of progress!

  45. #5795
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    August 31, 2019
    Hari Merdeka 2019




    Today’s Doodle depicts Malaysia’s national flower in honor of Malaysia’s Independence Day, known locally as Hari Merdeka.

    On this day in 1957, the Federation of Malaya became a sovereign state after many years of British rule. Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia's first Chief Minister, read an official declaration at Kuala Lumpur’s Stadium Merdeka before a crowd of some 20,000 people.

    Soon after the establishment of the new Southeast Asian nation, Malaysia adopted the hibiscus rosa-sinesis as its bunga raya, which translates literally as “celebratory flower” to reflect the celebration of unity in a multicultural nation. With its 5 petals representing the 5 principles of Malaysia’s national philosophy or rukun negara, the flower appears on much of the country’s currency. The Doodle art evokes the flower through the Malay tradition of metallic songket embroidery, a technique for embellishing fabrics with gold, long prized by nobility and royals.

    The Malaysian flag, locally known as Jalur Gemilang or “Stripes of Glory,” will fly proudly today on government buildings, private homes, and vehicles. The flag’s 14 alternating red and white stripes, as well as its 14-pointed star, represent the member states and territories of the federation.

    Festivities are centered in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur, but concerts, sporting events, and cultural exhibitions take place all over the country. The main Merdeka Parade includes a royal procession and elaborate floats as well as a military contingent, topped off with an evening of fireworks.

    Selamat Hari Merdeka!

  46. #5796
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    December 4, 2020
    Celebrating Noken Papua





    Today’s Doodle, illustrated by Depok-based guest artist Danu Fitra, celebrates Noken, the craft of traditional handmade bags that holds great cultural and socio-economic significance throughout Indonesia’s Papua and West Papua Provinces. In recent years the longevity of this staple of Papuan heritage has come under threat, but following its addition to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage List in Need of Urgent Safeguarding on this day in 2012, great strides have been taken to secure Noken’s sustainability for future generations.

    Noken bags are typically made from materials like tree fibers, bark, or leaves, which are processed into strong threads and then knotted or woven together. This complex handcraft has been passed down through the generations and demands refined tactile skill, dedicated care, and no shortage of artistic vision. The end product is a durable and versatile bag commonly used to transport and store things like food or firewood, and even to carry small children or animals!

    Outside of its everyday use, Noken has traditionally fulfilled many social and economic purposes as well. For example, Noken serves as a symbol of cultural unification among more than 250 ethnic groups in the region; due to its value, it can be used as a type of savings; and it often plays a symbolic role in the peaceful resolution of disputes.

    Here’s to a timeless craft that’s inextricably woven into the fabric of Indonesian culture!

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    September 19, 2017
    Amalia Hernandez’s 100th Birthday





    Today’s Doodle celebrates dancer and choreographer Amalia Hernandez. She founded the Ballet Folklorico de Mexico and used it to share Mexican culture with the world.

    Born in 1917, Hernandez developed a passion for performing and dance early in life. She became a choreographer at the Fine Arts National Institute, where she taught modern dance. She then turned her focus to traditional Mexican folk dances. She combined these dances with more choreographed movements from her formal training, helping to create an entirely new style of dance known as baile folklorico.

    In 1952, Hernandez founded the Ballet Folklorico de Mexico. Beginning with just eight dancers, the troupe grew to over three hundred in the years to follow. The company performed on television for the first time in 1954, after which they were featured in a weekly broadcast. This success allowed Amalia’s group to tour North America and even represent Mexico in the Pan American Games in 1959.

    The Ballet Folklorico de Mexico still performs to this day. Since its inception, the group has danced for more than 22 million people. Hernandez remained involved with the company until her death in 2000, working alongside her daughters and grandson.

    Happy 100th birthday to Amalia Hernandez, remembered as an ambassador of Mexican culture whose legacy lives on through the Ballet Folklorico.


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    December 29, 2017
    Kuppali Venkatappa Puttappa’s 113th Birthday








    Munjane ManjinoluPasuralli nadevaaga
    Anjisuva SanjeyoluUsirannu yelevaagaYele poove aalisuve
    Naa ninna geeteyanuYele poove solisuve
    Naa ninna preetiyanu!
    ---
    Amidst the early morning dew
    Walking across the greenery
    And in the evening that is scary
    While taking a breath,
    Oh flower, I listen to your song
    Oh flower, I defeat your love!

    Today we celebrate the life and literature of Kuppali Venkatappa Puttappa, a renowned 20th century Indian poet and author. Known more famously by his pen name Kuvempu, he is considered one of the greatest Kannada writers of his time. The Kannada language is spoken mainly in Kuvempu’s home state of Karnataka, and he strongly advocated for it to be the main medium of education.

    Kuvempu’s poem featured above is ‘Poovu’ [The Flower], rhapsodizing on the beauty of the poet’s natural surroundings. Kuvempu loved his writing to reflect the simple wonder of the world around him, especially flowers. To celebrate Kuvempu’s life and work, today’s Doodle by illustrator Upamanyu Bhattacharyya [and Swati Shelar, who helped with the Kannada lettering] shows Kuvempu surrounded by nature in his beloved home.

    Happy birthday, Kuvempu!
    Last edited by 9A; 08-04-2021 at 08:13 AM.

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    November 4, 2019
    Virginia Gutiérrez de Pineda’s 98th Birthday







    Today’s Doodle celebrates Virginia Gutiérrez de Pineda, the acclaimed Colombian anthropologist and educator whose pioneering research reshaped traditional family structures and folk culture of Colombia.

    Born in the town of El Socorro on this day in 1921, she was among the first generation of Colombian women allowed to pursue higher education. After studying at Bogotá’s Universidad Pedagógica Nacional, Gutiérrez then traveled to attend the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a master's degree in Social and Medical Anthropology before returning home to Colombia to complete her Doctorate of Social and Economic Sciences.

    Making the most of her educational opportunities, Gutiérrez went on to author a dozen book-length studies that laid out a fundamental understanding of the lives of Colombia’s people, including women and children of lower social and economic status. Her study of the street children of Medellín led to an interest in solving social problems by focusing on the family unit.

    In books like La familia en Colombia, Gutiérrez explored different cultural nuances within the various communities of the Andean, Santandereano, Antioqueño, and coastal-mining regions. She also undertook academic surveys of popular medicine in Colombia and traditional remedies known as curanderismo.

    Other than studying families, Gutiérrez also raised a family of her own after marrying fellow anthropologist Roberto Pineda Giraldo, whom she met at university. For her invaluable contributions to Colombian society, Gutiérrez was awarded Colombia’s Woman of the Year award in 1967, as well as the 1983 Gold Medal for Scientific Merit from the Inter-American Family Congress.

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    November 5, 2009
    40th Anniversary of Sesame Street - Cookie Monster







    Cookie Monster is a blue Muppet character on the long-running PBS/HBO children's television show Sesame Street. In a song in 2007, and later in an interview in 2017, Cookie Monster revealed that his real name is Sidney Monster. He is best known for his voracious appetite and his famous eating catchphrases, such as "Me want cookie!"

    Although he eats almost anything, including normally inedible objects, as his name suggests, his preferred food is cookies. Chocolate chip cookies are his favorite kind. Despite his voracious appetite for cookies, Cookie Monster shows awareness of healthy eating habits for young children and also enjoys fruits and eggplant.
    Last edited by 9A; 08-04-2021 at 08:21 AM.

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