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Thread: ***shine***

  1. #1

    Thumbs up ***shine***

    As we are discussing individual songs, i thought “Shine” worth a mention.
    I think the song has a lot of energy and a great hook that with decent airplay could have been a sizeable hit. It’s certainly more memorable then the Luke warm “Dirty Looks”. I don’t see the fact it had been released on a Simply Red album a couple of months prior being an issue.
    Its a great shame it was not recorded for the Swept Away album where it would have found the perfect home.. Perhaps used in place of the dismal “We Are The Children”. As it was, it was kind of stranded on the not so hot, Red Hot album, along with two other great songs. Summertime” and “Hard For Me To Say”.

  2. #2
    I agree it belong to Swept away, like Stranger in Paradise in a sense

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Albator View Post
    I agree it belong to Swept away, like Stranger in Paradise in a sense
    Agree. “Stranger In Paradise” would also have fitted very well with the Swept Away vibe.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    As we are discussing individual songs, i thought “Shine” worth a mention.
    I think the song has a lot of energy and a great hook that with decent airplay could have been a sizeable hit. It’s certainly more memorable then the Luke warm “Dirty Looks”. I don’t see the fact it had been released on a Simply Red album a couple of months prior being an issue.
    Its a great shame it was not recorded for the Swept Away album where it would have found the perfect home.. Perhaps used in place of the dismal “We Are The Children”. As it was, it was kind of stranded on the not so hot, Red Hot album, along with two other great songs. Summertime” and “Hard For Me To Say”.
    What about Cross my heart? That was one lovely song, but i do agree Shine would have been perfect for Swept Away.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    What about Cross my heart? That was one lovely song, but i do agree Shine would have been perfect for Swept Away.
    I also enjoy “Cross My Heart”
    “CMH”, “Hard For Me To Say” and in-particular the energetic “Shine” all had hit potential. Its a mystery to me why “Shine” was never ever considered for single release. Was Mr Lee really that much better lol.
    Do you know if it was Diana herself who selected Mr Lee as a single?. I seem to remember reading that she directed the video for the song.

  6. #6
    She really enjoys 50'/early 60's songs

  7. #7
    I made myself a expanded swept away in my playlist and used many of the red hot songs like Shine .
    Totally agree .great minds think a like

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by daviddh View Post
    I made myself a expanded swept away in my playlist and used many of the red hot songs like Shine .
    Totally agree .great minds think a like
    Snap david. By mixing some of the best songs from each of those albums you create a classic
    The fate of Red Hot is a massive shame as there really are some decent songs and fine vocal performances on the album It’s just unfortunate that none of those were ever considered for single release.

  9. #9
    Although released after the Simply Red version, the Simply Red website notes that Mick Hucknall wrote "Shine" specifically for Ross:

    This track is on the Men And Women album (1987) and was written for Diana Ross who also recorded it for her Red Hot Rhythm & Blues album (1987)

    https://www.simplyred.com/music-and-...d-women/shine/

    Name:  simply ross.jpg
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    (and Mick seems to sing the song from a women's perspective -- "boy", "pearls").

    Back in 1987, I was hoping they would release "Shine" as a single, as I loved it, as I did "It's Hard for Me to Say."

  10. #10
    Whatever ones opinions of RHR&B, there is no denying Diana was in great vocal form throughout. I think she sounds better here then on any other rca album.
    The awful choice of singles is quite astounding when you consider what was on offer.
    I really think ”Hard For Me To Say” or/and “Cross My Heart” would have worked brilliantly as duets. Perhaps one with with Luther, the other Lionel.
    I also think “Shine” as lead single would have attracted more attention to the album. The hit that never was.

  11. #11
    overall i agree that she sounds good on most of the tracks. she's a bit strained on Tell Me Again. but most of the other songs have a good, strong, energetic vocal. Some have thought There Goes My Baby is a bit lacking but i've always liked it

  12. #12
    It's nice how Diana is able to give relief, and various colors to her voice.
    This is especially true when comparing the two versions.

  13. #13
    Whatever its qualities, "Red Hot" is a perfect example of headless marketing.
    As a European, I may not be in the best position to judge the exact nature of R&B, but with such a title, I don't expect to hear sweet ballads.
    I remember a review in People magazine about the TV Special.
    "with her sequined dresses and her big Diva attitude, Miss Ross is a bit old-fashioned".


    All this lead me thinking that Diana didn't understand the 80's and that she had stayed in patterns that were no longer valid.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaap View Post
    Although released after the Simply Red version, the Simply Red website notes that Mick Hucknall wrote "Shine" specifically for Ross:

    This track is on the Men And Women album (1987) and was written for Diana Ross who also recorded it for her Red Hot Rhythm & Blues album (1987)

    https://www.simplyred.com/music-and-...d-women/shine/

    Name:  simply ross.jpg
Views: 473
Size:  43.4 KB

    (and Mick seems to sing the song from a women's perspective -- "boy", "pearls").

    Back in 1987, I was hoping they would release "Shine" as a single, as I loved it, as I did "It's Hard for Me to Say."
    'Shine' is a great, great track all-around. More Mick 'n Diana would have been great.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceNHarmony View Post
    'Shine' is a great, great track all-around. More Mick 'n Diana would have been great.
    Yes it would. Mick is a big fan of Diana and wanted to produce a full album on her, but Diana being Diana would not entertain the idea. Maybe she would have relented had Shine become a hit single.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Yes it would. Mick is a big fan of Diana and wanted to produce a full album on her, but Diana being Diana would not entertain the idea. Maybe she would have relented had Shine become a hit single.
    I had no idea Mick wanted to produce a full album with her. That’s incredible. I recall reading there was a time when Diana had wanted to shake Flo and tell her “Wake Up” That’s just what i would have wanted to do with Diana in the 80’s.
    I love Simply Red, and i’m sure MH would have done a splendid job. Missed opportunity how many lol.
    As Diana is sporting huge sunglasses on the cover, SHINE would surely have been the perfect title for the album. As much as I really like many of its songs, they don’t quite live up to the promise or expectation of red hot rhythm and blues.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    I had no idea Mick wanted to produce a full album with her. That’s incredible. I recall reading there was a time when Diana had wanted to shake Flo and tell her “Wake Up” That’s just what i would have wanted to do with Diana in the 80’s.
    I love Simply Red, and i’m sure MH would have done a splendid job. Missed opportunity how many lol.
    As Diana is sporting huge sunglasses on the cover, SHINE would surely have been the perfect title for the album. As much as I really like many of its songs, they don’t quite live up to the promise or expectation of red hot rhythm and blues.
    Oh yes he wanted to do a full album with her, but she wanted George Michael to produce an album for her but George was none too keen for some reason. I knew Mick Hucknall back in the day. I even gave him a lift to a Will Downing concert, but that's another story! I haven't seen or spoken with him for maybe 15 years, but he was a decent enough guy despite being an ardent Man Utd fan!

  18. #18
    Many moons ago i once attended a party and met someone who knew Mick Hucknall well. He shared a couple of naughty stories about him.
    I use to be really into Will Downing, attending one of his concerts years ago. One of my favourite songs is his version of “No Love Intended” I wonder if it was the same concert? lol.
    So what did George have that Mick didn’t?. Perhaps GM was perceived as being a little more pop mainstream then MH. Around what timeframe would that have been Bluebrock?.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    Many moons ago i once attended a party and met someone who knew Mick Hucknall well. He shared a couple of naughty stories about him.
    I use to be really into Will Downing, attending one of his concerts years ago. One of my favourite songs is his version of “No Love Intended” I wonder if it was the same concert? lol.
    So what did George have that Mick didn’t?. Perhaps GM was perceived as being a little more pop mainstream then MH. Around what timeframe would that have been Bluebrock?.
    Mick Hucknell was indeed "a naughty boy" in his younger days. We were never bosum pals, but we were quite friendly from the mid 80's through to the late 90's. I am not sure why Diana was reluctant to do a full album with him. Perhaps she thought him too inexperienced at that point? We are talking late 1980's when he sent some demos to her. I told her i thought they would be a good musical match but she took little notice of me and decided to persue George Michael who seemingly had little or no interest in producing her. This of course did not go down too well with Diana. She had expressed her admiration for George and was sure that would be enough to persuade him. She loved Careless Whisper and A Different corner. I am sure he could have worked his magic on her, but he evidently did not want her to be difficult in the studio. George was a perfectionist. He was very professional and expected everyone to turn up on time and basically work to his instructions. Diana probably did not fit that particular request!
    Going slightly off topic she wanted R.Kelly to produce an album for her on the 90's. I thought that was a splendid idea at the time, but their respective schedules did not allow it. Obviously Diana had no incline of the scandals surrounding R Kelly!
    Last edited by Bluebrock; 10-10-2020 at 07:52 AM.

  20. #20
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    I had the album, but I do nor remember Shine. I just now went to YouTube to hear it; I still don’t remember it. And, I see why I don’t remember it; it is completely unremarkable. Musically it was flat as a pancake. It was a second-rate rock/pop sound without without depth. It would have flopped had it been a single.

    Was this because the song was lousy or the producing was lousy? Or both?

    I always hoped The Pet Shop Boys would work with and produce Diana.
    Last edited by Circa 1824; 10-10-2020 at 08:47 AM.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Circa 1824 View Post
    I had the album, but I do nor remember Shine. I just now went to YouTube to hear it; I still don’t remember it. And, I see why I don’t remember it; it is completely unremarkable. Musically it was flat as a pancake. It was a second-rate rock/pop sound without without depth. It would have flopped had it been a single.

    Was this because the song was lousy or the producing was lousy? Or both?

    I always hoped The Pet Shop Boys would work with and produce Diana.
    Not sure the Pet Shop Boys would have been a good fit. Their work with Dusty and Liza were very patchy to say the very least.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Mick Hucknell was indeed "a naughty boy" in his younger days. We were never bosum pals, but we were quite friendly from the mid 80's through to the late 90's. I am not sure why Diana was reluctant to do a full album with him. Perhaps she thought him too inexperienced at that point? We are talking late 1980's when he sent some demos to her. I told her i thought they would be a good musical match but she took little notice of me and decided to persue George Michael who seemingly had little or no interest in producing her. This of course did not go down too well with Diana. She had expressed her admiration for George and was sure that would be enough to persuade him. She loved Careless Whisper and A Different corner. I am sure he could have worked his magic on her, but he evidently did not want her to be difficult in the studio. George was a perfectionist. He was very professional and expected everyone to turn up on time and basically work to his instructions. Diana probably did not fit that particular request!
    Going slightly off topic she wanted R.Kelly to produce an album for her on the 90's. I thought that was a splendid idea at the time, but their respective schedules did not allow it. Obviously Diana had no incline of the scandals surrounding R Kelly!
    I have heard that about George, so can’t really imagine he would have taken kindly to any meddling in the recording studio. The expression on his face at the anniversary of the Apollo Theatre in 85 kind of hints at his true feelings.
    As regards R.Kelly, musically that could have been a dynamic combination. Imagine having had the opportunity to produce the legendary M’s Ross and not being able to find a time slot. How could that be lol.
    I find it odd that she never teamed up with Ashford & Simpson again. Perhaps lack of a major hit off The Boss was the reason.
    Returning to the topic of RHR&B, i consider I it an album at odds with itself. Not quite sure what it wants to be. “Shine” vs “Mr Lee”.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Circa 1824 View Post
    I had the album, but I do nor remember Shine. I just now went to YouTube to hear it; I still don’t remember it. And, I see why I don’t remember it; it is completely unremarkable. Musically it was flat as a pancake. It was a second-rate rock/pop sound without without depth. It would have flopped had it been a single.

    Was this because the song was lousy or the producing was lousy? Or both?

    I always hoped The Pet Shop Boys would work with and produce Diana.
    But do you enjoy the music of Simply Red though Circa?. This is the question. If not i can perhaps understand a little better your feelings on the song.
    I do like the Pet Shop Boys, but like Bluebrock, cant imagine it being that great a matchup for Diana. I loved what they did with Liza, but that’s a very different voice.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    But do you enjoy the music of Simply Red though Circa?. This is the question. If not i can perhaps understand a little better your feelings on the song.
    I do like the Pet Shop Boys, but like Bluebrock, cant imagine it being that great a matchup for Diana. I loved what they did with Liza, but that’s a very different voice.
    The album they did with Dusty contained a couple of great songs, but way too many average at best tunes. Dusty herself was less than happy with the finished product, but Neil and Chris claimed to be happy with it.
    Liza's album was a little more consistent, but by no means great.
    I don't think they would have been a good match up for Diana. Three large ego's working together would have probably spelled disaster. There were many fraught moments with Dusty and Liza, but for differing reasons.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    I find it odd that she never teamed up with Ashford & Simpson again. Perhaps lack of a major hit off The Boss was the reason.
    I too do not understand why she turned a hard left from what made her great. Was it the Gene Simmons influence that pushed her into all these white rock directions that were not her strength and not the wishes of the fans?

    Honestly, I believe that Gene Simmons was the one to have put the bug in her ear to leave Motown and go for the big money elsewhere.

    She got the money, but lost her career. OMG, when I think about the garbage she put out during the RCA years vs. the utter brilliance of her Motown years ..... it is night and day ..... mind boggling.
    Last edited by Circa 1824; 10-11-2020 at 09:04 AM.

  26. #26
    Of all those white pop rock producers she approached, I only like Darryl Hall and Gary Katz unexpectedly.
    Barry Gibb was an odd option and George Michel would have been the same.

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    The album they did with Dusty contained a couple of great songs, but way too many average at best tunes. Dusty herself was less than happy with the finished product, but Neil and Chris claimed to be happy with it.
    Liza's album was a little more consistent, but by no means great.
    I don't think they would have been a good match up for Diana. Three large ego's working together would have probably spelled disaster. There were many fraught moments with Dusty and Liza, but for differing reasons.
    It’s been well documented that Dusty was an insecure, complex personality, so it’s no surprise there were fraught moments. Liza on the other hand has always come across as a real sweetie, if a bit manic at times. Am I being naive.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Circa 1824 View Post
    I too do not understand why she turned a hard left from what made her great. Was it the Gene Simmons influence that pushed her into all these white rock directions that were not her strength and not the wishes of the fans?

    Honestly, I believe that Gene Simmons was the one to have put the bug in her ear to leave Motown and go for the big money elsewhere.

    She got the money, but lost her career. OMG, when I think about the garbage she put out during the RCA years vs. the utter brilliance of her Motown years ..... it is night and day ..... mind boggling.
    Like you Circa, i do prefer her Motown/return to Motown recordings. As regards RCA, there is some good stuff mixed in amongst the dross. “SHINE” being just one example.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Albator View Post
    Of all those white pop rock producers she approached, I only like Darryl Hall and Gary Katz unexpectedly.
    Barry Gibb was an odd option and George Michel would have been the same.
    Barry Gibb was a bit of an odd choice, but he did gift her “Chain Reaction” so for that alone it was worth it.
    The Gary Katz songs though not chart toppers are classy. A whole GK album would/could have been a classic

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    It’s been well documented that Dusty was an insecure, complex personality, so it’s no surprise there were fraught moments. Liza on the other hand has always come across as a real sweetie, if a bit manic at times. Am I being naive.
    Dusty was an absolute nightmare to work with by all accounts. I met her a couple of times but never worked directly with her. She was quite charming to talk to when she was feeling relaxed, and that is how i can thankfully remember. I have never met Liza, but i know people who have and they most certainly did not describe her as a "real sweetie". I can only go off what i have been told. The sessions with the Pet Shop Boys were laiden with drama by all accounts.

  31. #31
    « She got the money but lost her career. ». She did. But she didn’t care enough to go get it back... do whatever needed to be done... do a duet with a big male star, such as Michael or Smokey (I’m not counting Julio, she did that as a favour to him, in return for him doing her a favour!), take a part in a Hollywood ensemble, like « The Color Purple » or « The Witches of Eastwick », do a run on Broadway.... She just didn’t want to! She was putting herself and her family first. She had had enough of show-business. Once she was managing herself she called all the shots. She was only prepared to do what she wanted to do. Or so I would imagine she might say, if we were ever chatting....

  32. #32
    I wonder why her RCA or Capitol records, were flop in UK. Isn't it strange that with Chain reaction as a n1 lead single, the Eaten Alive album isn't even silver?
    Julio Iglesias was a big name in UK, yet it wasn't enough to push Swept Away higher on the charts, not to talk about Red Hot.
    Overall, in Europe, the 81-87 period was a low sales time for her records.
    In France, Muscles, All of you and Chain reaction were modest hits, but all the LPs were flop.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Dusty was an absolute nightmare to work with by all accounts. I met her a couple of times but never worked directly with her. She was quite charming to talk to when she was feeling relaxed, and that is how i can thankfully remember. I have never met Liza, but i know people who have and they most certainly did not describe her as a "real sweetie". I can only go off what i have been told. The sessions with the Pet Shop Boys were laiden with drama by all accounts.
    It just goes to show you never really know! lol. Like her mother, Liza has always come across as being quite vulnerable to me.
    I guess it’s the same with any big celeb. I was once told by two people that had worked with Diana in the late 70’s that she can be a nightmare if things don’t go her way. Yet yourself and others have told of a softer, kinder side.
    Talking of celebs, i once met Olivia Newton John at a formal dinner and have to say she was just the nicest, most non-diva like person you could ever wish to meet.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Dusty was an absolute nightmare to work with by all accounts. I met her a couple of times but never worked directly with her. She was quite charming to talk to when she was feeling relaxed, and that is how i can thankfully remember. I have never met Liza, but i know people who have and they most certainly did not describe her as a "real sweetie". I can only go off what i have been told. The sessions with the Pet Shop Boys were laiden with drama by all accounts.
    I LOVE Pet/Liza's 'Results', and for me it holds up to this day as a wonderful, entertaining lp. Here in the States I've never heard bad about Liza in terms of attitude, but certainly decades of substance addiction would have made her less-than the perfect working collaborator. One fact can't be denied - during her best years Liza could match anyone working as a burn-it-down live performer! Her extended stays at Carnegie Hall, Radio City, the Wintergarden, etc are all legendary events.

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceNHarmony View Post
    I LOVE Pet/Liza's 'Results', and for me it holds up to this day as a wonderful, entertaining lp. Here in the States I've never heard bad about Liza in terms of attitude, but certainly decades of substance addiction would have made her less-than the perfect working collaborator. One fact can't be denied - during her best years Liza could match anyone working as a burn-it-down live performer! Her extended stays at Carnegie Hall, Radio City, the Wintergarden, etc are all legendary events.
    I also like ‘Results’ and agree it still sounds fresh and relevant today. I also love the ‘Gently’ album. Even now and many concerts later, Liza at her peak is the best performer i have ever seen on stage. The last time I saw her was at the Royal Albert Hall, London in 2002. Although way past her best, she still had that something.

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Albator View Post
    Of all those white pop rock producers she approached, I only like Darryl Hall and Gary Katz unexpectedly.
    Barry Gibb was an odd option and George Michel would have been the same.
    Why was Barry Gibb an odd option? He had worked his magic with two other legendary female vocalists in Streisand and Dionne, not to mention working with Kenny Rogers. I also happen to think George Michael could have written some classic tunes for Diana, but i am not sure they would have worked well in the studio together.
    Last edited by Bluebrock; 10-12-2020 at 02:55 AM.

  37. #37
    Why? It's a matter of personal feelings. The moment I new he was going to produce a record for Diana, I was disappointed.
    I have always wondered why Streisand never did an album with Quincy Jones who is an intimate friend of her. Maybe she knows that his rythm is not suited to her voice, and I think Barry Gibb is not suited to Diana.
    Chain reaction was a big hit, maybe because of the clip... As far as I know, the album is not certified in UK.

  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Albator View Post
    Why? It's a matter of personal feelings. The moment I new he was going to produce a record for Diana, I was disappointed.
    I have always wondered why Streisand never did an album with Quincy Jones who is an intimate friend of her. Maybe she knows that his rythm is not suited to her voice, and I think Barry Gibb is not suited to Diana.
    Chain reaction was a big hit, maybe because of the clip... As far as I know, the album is not certified in UK.
    Eaten Alive is a very divisive album. One of my friends regards it as his favorite Ross album ever. I wouldn't quite go that far, but i regard it as one of her better rca efforts. Perhaps i am biased because i am a friend of Barry, and i regard him as a musical genius. Both he and Diana evidently thought they could work well together. Whether you and i agree or disagree with that is totally irrelevant now, but Barry regards Chain Reaction as his best ever outside production on anyone. I just wish they had worked together a few years earlier when the likes of Islands in the stream was offered to her.

  39. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Eaten Alive is a very divisive album. One of my friends regards it as his favorite Ross album ever. I wouldn't quite go that far, but i regard it as one of her better rca efforts. Perhaps i am biased because i am a friend of Barry, and i regard him as a musical genius. Both he and Diana evidently thought they could work well together. Whether you and i agree or disagree with that is totally irrelevant now, but Barry regards Chain Reaction as his best ever outside production on anyone. I just wish they had worked together a few years earlier when the likes of Islands in the stream was offered to her.
    I do like most of the songs, except for Eaten Alive and Oh Teacher. For me, the problem is the muddled mixing of Diana's voice. Very disappointed that I couldn't hear or understand the words.

    Saying it's one of her better RCA efforts isn't saying much, imo. With better mixing, I think it could have been, though.

    Barry regards Chain Reaction as his best ever outside production on anyone.
    Chain Reaction is definitely the highlight of Eaten Alive for me. After Missing You, it is my favorite Ross RCA track. But I also love Streisand's Woman In Love and The Love Inside.

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Why was Barry Gibb an odd option? He had worked his magic with two other legendary female vocalists in Streisand and Dionne, not to mention working with Kenny Rogers. I also happen to think George Michael could have written some classic tunes for Diana, but i am not sure they would have worked well in the studio together.
    i've voiced my dislike for the EA collection here many times so i won't rehash that.

    in 86, US pop music was very "anti disco." any reference to bell bottoms or 70s fads, fashion or music was a HUGE no-no. of course club and house music still pulled heavily from the dance music of the 70s and all. but the general population wanting NO association whatsoever with that decade. any anyone that was heavily connected to that era was equally "verboten"

    John Travolta, Olivia, Bee Gees, Gloria Gaynor, Donna Summer.

    IMO Diana Ross escaped most of this backlash but by 85 she was definitely approaching "has been" status. she was competing with Madonna, Whitney, Cyndi and many many other more contemporary artists.

    her Swept Away album did ok in the general public's mind. Missing You was beautiful and loved. frankly i remember All Of You more than the title track though, in terms of general pop music play. The album did nicely but certainly not a mega-smash. that year you had Thriller, Purple Rain, Footloose and so many others.

    So she needed a mega album and a mega hit. Anything associated with Berry Gibb was going to be considered poison in the US

  41. #41
    When Diana's 1985 project was originally announced, I read that it was going to be produced by Barry Manilow. Was that ever a possibility or did writers just confuse him with Barry Gibb? In any event, I thought a pairing with Barry might have been interesting.

    That said, I've said often that the EATEN ALIVE album just didn't grab me as a whole. I liked a few songs on it but many I don't remember at all. Come to think of it, I feel the same about HEARTBREAKER, Barry's collaboration with Dionne.

  42. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    When Diana's 1985 project was originally announced, I read that it was going to be produced by Barry Manilow. Was that ever a possibility or did writers just confuse him with Barry Gibb? In any event, I thought a pairing with Barry might have been interesting.

    That said, I've said often that the EATEN ALIVE album just didn't grab me as a whole. I liked a few songs on it but many I don't remember at all. Come to think of it, I feel the same about HEARTBREAKER, Barry's collaboration with Dionne.
    I feel the same. Both albums were disappointments. I liked the single Heartbreaker very much (but prefer Chain Reaction).

    Barry Manilow would have been interesting. His Dionne album is a pop masterpiece, imo.

  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    When Diana's 1985 project was originally announced, I read that it was going to be produced by Barry Manilow. Was that ever a possibility or did writers just confuse him with Barry Gibb? In any event, I thought a pairing with Barry might have been interesting.

    That said, I've said often that the EATEN ALIVE album just didn't grab me as a whole. I liked a few songs on it but many I don't remember at all. Come to think of it, I feel the same about HEARTBREAKER, Barry's collaboration with Dionne.
    I think it must have been a misprint. I don't think any discussions took place for Manilow to produce Diana. It could have been a good move . Manilow is a solid producer and the results could have been interesting.
    I personally love the Heartbreaker album. Different strokes i guess, but it is good to be able to have differing opinions yet remain respectful to each others views. Long may it continue.

  44. #44
    I'm a fan of the Bee Gees, I'm a fan of Guilty, or the duets between Olivia and Andy Gibb, and Olivia and Barry.
    But his own solo album in 1984 isn't very good.
    Very recently there was a lengthy article about the making of Guilty. How, all were implicated in making the album a success. Streisand giving the best vocal she could and after that, a great amount of time for mixing every tracks to get the pop sound needed to make it work.
    I have read, that Barry and Karl Richardson were very disappointed by the lack of presence of Diana.

  45. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by lucky2012 View Post
    I feel the same. Both albums were disappointments. I liked the single Heartbreaker very much (but prefer Chain Reaction).

    Barry Manilow would have been interesting. His Dionne album is a pop masterpiece, imo.
    I agree. I would have loved Barry Manilow to produce her. His work with Dionne Warwick is so good.

  46. #46
    The Diana Ross project page, sums up better than I could

    What was going wrong? There are those fans who contend this is Diana’s best RCA album, and they blame a lack of proper single choice, promotion, and negative publicity surrounding Ross for the album’s lackluster performance in her home country. Those factors are all probably true, but another clear problem is that Diana Ross doesn’t sound like Diana Ross on Eaten Alive. At all. The culprit is the singer’s incredible talent for mimicry; just listen to her discography and watch her TV specials, filled with striking examples of Miss Ross imitating another artists to startling effect. Here, she goes so far adapting her style to Gibb’s that her voice is generally high, thin, and raspy, totally eradicating the rich soulful tone of recent hits like “Missing You” and “Swept Away.” Because Gibb’s demos for the album have since been released, it’s clear that Diana rarely strayed from his guide vocals; on certain tracks, it’s tough to tell their voices apart. In a time when bigger voices — in terms of both power and range — were beginning to dominate popular music, Diana Ross was allowing hers to shrink away.
    Yet, I like very much, Love being in love with you, Love on the line, Don't give up and to a lesser degree, I'm watching you. But she sings so high, I doubt she could have done it live.
    I don't think "chain reaction" is very good when done live.

  47. #47
    If the album Barry did with Dionne in 79 is any indication it could have been a great matchup. Quite a few of the songs on it would have been perfect for Diana.
    I find ‘Heartbreaker’ a slightly stronger album overall then ‘Eaten Alive’. I remember reading that Dionne herself did not really care for it much. To me it is one of her best albums of the 80’s
    Last edited by Ollie9; 10-13-2020 at 11:42 AM.

  48. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie9 View Post
    If the album Barry did with Dionne in 79 is any indication it could have been a great matchup. Quite a few of the songs on it would have been perfect for Diana.
    I find ‘Heartbreaker’ a slightly stronger album overall then ‘Eaten Alive’. I remember reading that Dionne herself did not really care for it much. To me it is one of her best albums of the 80’s
    Dionne was openly critical of some of the songs. She was dissing it at the time of release which totally pissed a very angry Barry. He vowed never to work with Dionne again.

  49. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    Dionne was openly critical of some of the songs. She was dissing it at the time of release which totally pissed a very angry Barry. He vowed never to work with Dionne again.
    Around the time of HEARTBREAKER's release, Dionne did an interview with (I believe) the LA Times that later ran in EBONY as well. I don't know if they caught Dionne on a bad day but she was negative towards the title track of HEARTBREAKER, talked about problems with SOLID GOLD, and her feelings about her replacement on the show, Marilyn McCoo.

  50. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    Around the time of HEARTBREAKER's release, Dionne did an interview with (I believe) the LA Times that later ran in EBONY as well. I don't know if they caught Dionne on a bad day but she was negative towards the title track of HEARTBREAKER, talked about problems with SOLID GOLD, and her feelings about her replacement on the show, Marilyn McCoo.
    I remember that article. Wasn't the subheading something to the effect of "I'm not sour grapes about 'Solid Gold'"?

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