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  1. #1

    How Isaac Hayes Changed Soul Music - The New Yorker Magazine


  2. #2
    He was the first one I remember having long recordings on his albums with a rap included. He was a trailblazer. His daughter is now a professional singer as well.

  3. #3
    Thanks for sharing the article about Isaac Hayes' Hot Buttered Soul. Not only did HBS change Soul Music, it also led the way to the classic albums by Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder and others (by proving that Album-Oriented Soul Music could sell in the millions).

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Motown Eddie View Post
    Thanks for sharing the article about Isaac Hayes' Hot Buttered Soul. Not only did HBS change Soul Music, it also led the way to the classic albums by Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder and others (by proving that Album-Oriented Soul Music could sell in the millions).
    That's a very valid, and rarely discussed facet of Hayes' influence. Great to point out.

  5. #5
    Isaac Hayes was a trailblazer on several fronts. The most impressive thing to me was what he did in his brilliant soundtrack with Shaft... My personal memory of meeting Isaac at O'Hare airport in Chicago in the early 70's as we had a fairly lengthy conversation about music and some people we mutually knew, even to the point of his asking me if he could continue walking and talking with me down the corridor to my plane, even though his gate was in a different direction...Just an outstanding down to earth human being I'm glad I had the pleasure of meeting and enjoying his music through the decades...

  6. #6
    The Ike I love.

  7. #7
    Thanks for sharing that StuBass1. Isaac Hayes is one of the ones I regret never seeing I in concert.
    Definitely a trailblazer .
    If someone said he invented disco with SHAFT, I could understand their argument. So many of its elements (wah wah , cooing female backups, constant beat , high hat)became commonplace in disco including of all things the flute .
    HOT BUTTERED SOUL was certainly revolutionary. Shows what can be done when given free reign and time to explore ideas in the studio as he had .
    I'm glad to hear he was a nice guy , I always had that impression.

  8. #8
    I still listen to his albums when I can.

  9. #9
    Name:  98659423_max.jpg
Views: 241
Size:  44.9 KBEverybody should read this:

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceNHarmony View Post
    That's a very valid, and rarely discussed facet of Hayes' influence. Great to point out.
    Other examples of Isaac's influence are songs featuring extended monologues, dramatic changes in mood and sweeping orchestral strings such as...


  11. #11
    Greatness galore!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I still listen to his albums when I can.
    The first time I heard Isaac Hayes, my friends and I were listening to the radio when this deep baritone voice started talking over a steady organ groove. We were so mesmerized, as we had never heard anything like this before, but when he got to the end and started singing by the Time I Get to Phoenix, we were so done!! We could not believe that this brother took us on this journey about his woman and then gave us Glen Campbell. It was unbelievable, but genius and we were hooked on Isaac ever sense.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by nysister View Post
    The first time I heard Isaac Hayes, my friends and I were listening to the radio when this deep baritone voice started talking over a steady organ groove. We were so mesmerized, as we had never heard anything like this before, but when he got to the end and started singing by the Time I Get to Phoenix, we were so done!! We could not believe that this brother took us on this journey about his woman and then gave us Glen Campbell. It was unbelievable, but genius and we were hooked on Isaac ever sense.
    Sister! I can relate. I had my first "Isaac Hayes Experience" when my mother bought his album "The Isaac Hayes Movement" around Christmas 1970. I was into kid music like the Jackson 5 etc then as I was just 10 years old, but listening to "I Stand Accused", "I Just Don't Know What to Do with Myself" was something almost spiritual to the point that I still listen to those songs today! This is was before "Shaft" and all the music he would later produce as "Black Moses".

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by jack020 View Post
    Name:  98659423_max.jpg
Views: 241
Size:  44.9 KBEverybody should read this:
    Stuart Cosgrove is Scottish, from Perth. He is a huge soul music fan particularly Northern Soul. He has written a few books about soul music.
    Last edited by Cosmic Truth; 10-19-2019 at 03:15 PM.

  15. #15
    This book tells about the background of Isaac

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmic Truth View Post
    Stuart Cosgrove is Scottish, from Perth. He is a huge soul music fan particularly Northern Soul. He has written a few books about soul music.
    Thanks for the post; looks interesting.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by jack020 View Post
    This book tells about the background of Isaac
    Good to hear; I will look into the book.

  18. #18
    Get all 3: essential reading for soul fans.
    Detroit 67, Memphis 68 and Harlem 69.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stuart-Cosg...rwt_scns_share

  19. #19
    He invented among other things two things so seminals:
    - Symphonic Soul
    - Extended tracks (one track for one side of an LP!)

    (perhaps also invented the "typical" OST for an entire cinema genre, Blaxplotation; perhaps also can be considered the godfather of rap with his long monologues, contributed to the "disco - soul" if this tag is correct or ultra-up-tempo for dance soul tracks)

    Anyway, despite of these facts, from my teens on I allways have had Mr. Ike in a high place on my list of favorite vocalists (and instrumentalists!) and "It's Heaven To Me" or the instrumental "Eli's Love Theme" are both IMHO a definition of what SOUL means.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by jack020 View Post
    Get all 3: essential reading for soul fans.
    Detroit 67, Memphis 68 and Harlem 69.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stuart-Cosg...rwt_scns_share
    Thanks, Jack20! I shall.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    Thanks for sharing that StuBass1. Isaac Hayes is one of the ones I regret never seeing I in concert.
    Definitely a trailblazer .
    If someone said he invented disco with SHAFT, I could understand their argument. So many of its elements (wah wah , cooing female backups, constant beat , high hat)became commonplace in disco including of all things the flute .
    HOT BUTTERED SOUL was certainly revolutionary. Shows what can be done when given free reign and time to explore ideas in the studio as he had .
    I'm glad to hear he was a nice guy , I always had that impression.
    All true. I still love him today. But I say Motown had the sound of Disco with Cloud nine in 1968. A high hat and second drummer going hard was first. This sound alone gave Motown it's first Grammy!

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