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  1. #1

    Hey Girl - The Temptations

    "My Girl" of course was a Tempts classic in the 60s, but in the 70s they scored another one with "Hey Girl" that they perform here:


  2. #2
    I've always loved this song, Marv! "Hey Girl (I Like Your Style)", plus "Law Of The Land", "Ma", and "Plastic Man" were always my favorite tracks from The Tempts' "Masterpiece" LP.

  3. "Hey Girl" is one of those "hidden classics". What I mean by that is, you won't hear it on mainstream oldies stations alongside "My Girl", "Ain't Too Proud To Beg" or others, but to me, it stands right on the same level. This was truly a showcase for Richard Street. The longer, album version is my favorite. Such a beautifully melancholy performance.

  4. #4
    In the UK, this track was released as a B-side, with "I Need You" from 1990 as the A-side.

    At this point in time the Temps' chart race was effectively run in the UK, and neither track was commercial enough for the more pop-orientated UK singles market.

    For me, "Hey Girl" is ruined by the fact that the sax is flat throughout. This sounds like an overdub that didn't work out properly.

    Hearing Richard Street beautifully sustaining a note and then to hear the sax come in over the top playing flat destroys the experience for me.

    Having listened again, I'm almost certain that Richard Street and the strings are in one key and the Temps' background vocals and the sax are in a slightly lower key, i.e. a bit flat.

    All in all, a bit of an out-of-tune experience, and that's a shame since the track has a lot of great elements, including the backing vocal arrangement and Richard Street's vocals.

    (The out-of-tune-ness reminds me of "Love Really Hurts Without You" by Billy Ocean. That's a great track but something's out of key on it and I think that it's Billy. I think that he goes sharp in a number of places leaving me wondering what key the track is in.)

    When I pull out this Temps single, it's "In Need You" that I end up listening to.

    Sorry!
    Last edited by Sotosound; 09-04-2019 at 04:29 AM. Reason: Pitch

  5. #5
    There's nothing wrong with that saxophone. I think you're hearing it differently than American fans of this song do and have for decades now...Try looking into A minor. The thirds may be messing with your interpretation...
    Last edited by splanky; 09-04-2019 at 05:55 AM.

  6. #6
    I use to try to sing "Hey Girl" when I was only in the 7th Grade. This song was so nice it has stuck with me all of these years.

  7. #7
    Good one marv,unfortunately this gem got caught up in some politics between berry and black dj's and didn't get the push that it should've.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Good one marv,unfortunately this gem got caught up in some politics between berry and black dj's and didn't get the push that it should've.
    Really? What happened? I do remember it getting some radio airplay where I lived.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by splanky View Post
    There's nothing wrong with that saxophone. I think you're hearing it differently than American fans of this song do and have for decades now...Try looking into A minor. The thirds may be messing with your interpretation...
    This isn't about scales.

    Either the saxophone is recorded slightly flat, or Richard Street is singing slightly sharp. Either way, it's enough to be heard.

    It's very clear after Richard Street first sings "Hey girl." It's also very obvious just before he sings "Don't turn away."

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    really? What happened? I do remember it getting some radio airplay where i lived.
    legend has it that black dj's were pissed at berry,something about him not giving enough respect to them for motown's success so during this period some songs didn't get as much play..i could be off on the reason but i'm close.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    legend has it that black dj's were pissed at berry,something about him not giving enough respect to them for motown's success so during this period some songs didn't get as much play..i could be off on the reason but i'm close.
    It could be true. In his book, Otis Williams wrote about how djs were pissed over something Motown President Ewart Abner said when he accepted an American Music Award on their behalf. To protest, they held off of playing Richard's lead on HEAVENLY.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    legend has it that black dj's were pissed at berry,something about him not giving enough respect to them for motown's success so during this period some songs didn't get as much play..i could be off on the reason but i'm close.
    I think that is more likely what happened. The Supremes Stevie Wonder produced "Bad Weather" came out around the same time as "Hey Girl" and received virtually NO airplay in a lot of cities.

  13. #13
    Is it possible that this record wasnít a smash hit partly because acts like Harold Melvin And The Blue Notes, The Spinners etc. were more popular by this time and that Motown was falling seriously out of step with the record buying public with the exception of seminal artists such as Marvin and Stevie, who themselves had already musically left Motown far behind.

    To reach a point shortly thereafter where David Ruffin was being produced by Van McCoy and Eddie Kendricks was recording at Sigma Sound spoke volumes about how Motown was losing any musical identity of its own.

    This was a sad time for me as a big Motown fan.

    Also, although itís clearly highly thought of, was this track really strong singles material?

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Sotosound View Post
    Is it possible that this record wasn’t a smash hit partly because acts like Harold Melvin And The Blue Notes, The Spinners etc. were more popular by this time and that Motown was falling seriously out of step with the record buying public with the exception of seminal artists such as Marvin and Stevie, who themselves had already musically left Motown far behind.

    To reach a point shortly thereafter where David Ruffin was being produced by Van McCoy and Eddie Kendricks was recording at Sigma Sound spoke volumes about how Motown was losing any musical identity of its own.

    This was a sad time for me as a big Motown fan.

    Also, although it’s clearly highly thought of, was this track really strong singles material?
    The Temptations popularity wasn't the case at all. I was very around during that time and the Tempts were just as popular as the other groups you mention. Just prior to the "Masterpiece" album they had scored big with "Papa Was A Rolling Stone" and the single "Masterpiece, which proceeded "Hey Girl" was also pretty popular. So, it cannot be attributed to their then popularity.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Sotosound View Post
    Is it possible that this record wasn’t a smash hit partly because acts like Harold Melvin And The Blue Notes, The Spinners etc. were more popular by this time and that Motown was falling seriously out of step with the record buying public with the exception of seminal artists such as Marvin and Stevie, who themselves had already musically left Motown far behind.

    To reach a point shortly thereafter where David Ruffin was being produced by Van McCoy and Eddie Kendricks was recording at Sigma Sound spoke volumes about how Motown was losing any musical identity of its own.

    This was a sad time for me as a big Motown fan.

    Also, although it’s clearly highly thought of, was this track really strong singles material?
    I think it was strong singles material and deserved to do much better.
    The five minute album version I like as well but it somehow doesn't do that much more for it , vocally certainly, than the edited single imo, although the five minute version doesn't feel overly long and Norman can go ahead and give the sax as much time as he feels is right with full support from me.

    Perhaps the record's sound was just a bit ahead of its time ? Norman would in a few years further develop it into a successful one with Rose Royce as I hear it .



    oh wow , out of curiosity, I checked IM GOING DOWN's chart success, ...it only reached #70 !!, on the Bilboard Hot 100!! Can that be true !!!
    Last edited by Boogiedown; 09-05-2019 at 02:44 AM.

  16. #16
    The only time I heard Bad Weather was when it was performed on Soul Train! The radio stations did not seem to play it, although I listened to the radio only an hour or two each day, so I may have missed it. But The Supremes' previous releases -- I Guess I'll Miss The Man; Produced And Arranged By Jimmy Webb -- had not been the hits some had hoped for, which could have accounted for the minimal air time Bad Weather was accorded.

    If the theory about DJ backlash is correct, things did not improve for Motown over the next few years, as also I never heard the Diana Ross single Sorry Doesn't Always Make It Right on the pop radio station.

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