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  1. #1

    "Must Be the Music"- movie soundtracks

    Some film releases are made on the strength of the soundtrack. Others are enhanced. Still others, the music is the only redeeming quality!
    Actually, at times, it can mean the difference in becoming a blockbuster or sinking at the box office.

    An example, of the second scenario is The Guardian of the Galaxy 1st.release.

    Your turn.

  2. #2
    Seriously? The soundtrack to O Brother, Where Art Thou? made me a bluegrass fan. I listened to it several times a day for weeks. And since we dusted off the American Graffiti vs Cooley High thread, both of those movies had dynamic soundtracks. Finally (for now because I could do this all day) the Forrest Gump soundtrack is the single greatest collection of '60s music for a movie in history. Prove me wrong.

  3. #3
    Oh, by the way. Streets of Fire is an underrated gem. The only hit on its soundtrack was Dan Hartman's I Could Dream About You but the movie was full of great music through and through. A great assortment of '80s sounds if not not '80s blockbusters.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Seriously? The soundtrack to O Brother, Where Art Thou? made me a bluegrass fan. I listened to it several times a day for weeks. And since we dusted off the American Graffiti vs Cooley High thread, both of those movies had dynamic soundtracks. Finally (for now because I could do this all day) the Forrest Gump soundtrack is the single greatest collection of '60s music for a movie in history. Prove me wrong.
    You right!!! As usual, Jer. On all points.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Oh, by the way. Streets of Fire is an underrated gem. The only hit on its soundtrack was Dan Hartman's I Could Dream About You but the movie was full of great music through and through. A great assortment of '80s sounds if not not '80s blockbusters.
    Yes! I still rock out to Dan Hartman! On my playlist right now.

  6. #6
    Another great one for me is from Valley Girl. It was a very low budget movie that actually had a good story, remarkable acting and a soundtrack that included new wave music when it was still being ignored by a lot of other mainstream projects. The best songs were those that were actually the punk that was just edging onto the pop charts back then. Josey Cotton and the Plimsouls were the highlights and I still turn it up when their scenes come on. The only hits from the soundtrack were those that weren't recorded for the movie (Melt With You by Modern English and Men At Work's Who Can It Be Now), but Johnny, Are You Queer and A Million Miles Away broke genre walls for me and allowed me to listen to music outside my comfort zone.

    On another note: I'm amazed that until high school, the only music I listened to was soul/funk/R&B. I was really a snob about it too. Then, one of my best friends introduced me to jazz against my will and I'm now a jazz snob. Other classmates played Queen and Blondie and the Cars in the background of art class and I became a fan of new wave. My cousin Tony got bused to a nearly all-white school and started playing AC/DC when I visited and although it took awhile, I'm a fan of some metal. And it took me a decade to start buying hip hop.

    The only kind of music that I don't care for now is modern pop/top 40, which is too sterile, electronic and programmed for my tastes. A great movie soundtrack can absolutely put it over the top.

  7. #7
    Beverly Hills Cop was a top 10 soundtrack. Glenn Frey, Pointer Sisters, the System and Patti LaBelle all had great songs on it. And don't forget this one:

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Another great one for me is from Valley Girl. It was a very low budget movie that actually had a good story, remarkable acting and a soundtrack that included new wave music when it was still being ignored by a lot of other mainstream projects. The best songs were those that were actually the punk that was just edging onto the pop charts back then. Josey Cotton and the Plimsouls were the highlights and I still turn it up when their scenes come on. The only hits from the soundtrack were those that weren't recorded for the movie (Melt With You by Modern English and Men At Work's Who Can It Be Now), but Johnny, Are You Queer and A Million Miles Away broke genre walls for me and allowed me to listen to music outside my comfort zone.

    On another note: I'm amazed that until high school, the only music I listened to was soul/funk/R&B. I was really a snob about it too. Then, one of my best friends introduced me to jazz against my will and I'm now a jazz snob. Other classmates played Queen and Blondie and the Cars in the background of art class and I became a fan of new wave. My cousin Tony got bused to a nearly all-white school and started playing AC/DC when I visited and although it took awhile, I'm a fan of some metal. And it took me a decade to start buying hip hop.

    The only kind of music that I don't care for now is modern pop/top 40, which is too sterile, electronic and programmed for my tastes. A great movie soundtrack can absolutely put it over the top.
    Love Men at Work! Used to always confuse them with, equally good, Men Without Hats! Later, Men at Large (r &b duo).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Beverly Hills Cop was a top 10 soundtrack. Glenn Frey, Pointer Sisters, the System and Patti LaBelle all had great songs on it. And don't forget this one:
    Yes, indeedy! Loved them all. Especially Axel F, because of the pivotal scene it enhanced with Eddie scoping out the house!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by nativeNY63 View Post
    Love Men at Work! Used to always confuse them with, equally good, Men Without Hats! Later, Men at Large (r &b duo).
    I was a fan as well. It amazed me to find out that they were a bunch of guys who met at open nights in an Australian pub who managed to play good music with each other. But it turns out that since they were never friends, they didn't have a common bond and didn't really like each other. Usually, bands break up after successful efforts because of jealousy or some change in their relationship's dynamic. These guys apparently broke up because they never really liked each other to begin with. Wonder if they're happy now?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I was a fan as well. It amazed me to find out that they were a bunch of guys who met at open nights in an Australian pub who managed to play good music with each other. But it turns out that since they were never friends, they didn't have a common bond and didn't really like each other. Usually, bands break up after successful efforts because of jealousy or some change in their relationship's dynamic. These guys apparently broke up because they never really liked each other to begin with. Wonder if they're happy now?
    Good point, Jer. Just read about David Lee Roth's interview about Van Halen. Despite all their success (like " Jump")" We always hated each other!"
    I'm starting to believe the same is true of NE. Think about it, all their successes: Bell Biv Devoe, Bobby & Johnny's star-making solo careers, and now Rbrm. And yet, that just can't seem to get a workable NE back together. Hmm

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by nativeNY63 View Post
    Good point, Jer. Just read about David Lee Roth's interview about Van Halen. Despite all their success (like " Jump")" We always hated each other!"
    I'm starting to believe the same is true of NE. Think about it, all their successes: Bell Biv Devoe, Bobby & Johnny's star-making solo careers, and now Rbrm. And yet, that just can't seem to get a workable NE back together. Hmm
    Personal dynamics are amazing. People go from being best friends to bitter enemies when any combination of drugs/alcohol, money, sex or ego are introduced to the relationship. It's an age-old story in the music industry.

    I'd love to hear the reason why Charlie and Ronnie Wilson are at loggerheads over the use of the Gap Band's name. Charlie clearly has no intention of using it again. Then, Mark Adam Wood snuck and bought the rights to Lakeside's name against the best interest of his childhood friends and keeps them from booking with it.

    Makes me wonder how the Tops, Whispers, Eddie LeVert and Walter Williams, and (four members of) the Spinners were able to stand being with each other for over four decades.

  13. #13
    I love the soundtrack of-lovejones.

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