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  1. #1

    Manchester UK - My town

    As a result of some posts in the DRATS forum, I've set up a thread for Marv , and other members, to discuss any Manchester issues.
    Marv is a fan of Coronation Street TV soap. ( set in a fictional area called Weather field) in Manchester/Salford
    If you have an interest in Manchester please join in.

  2. #2
    Marv
    I think the 1975 concert was correct. The Supremes/Sweet Sensation.
    I think it was the last M/C/S appearance, but others could confirm this.
    I remember attending and meeting a friend ( a SDF member actually) after the show.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Marv
    I think the 1975 concert was correct. The Supremes/Sweet Sensation.
    I think it was the last M/C/S appearance, but others could confirm this.
    I remember attending and meeting a friend ( a SDF member actually) after the show.
    I had found a concert poster for that particular concert. I don't know where it is at the moment, but if I find it, I will post it here.

  4. #4
    Here's something I've always wondered about. Why is Manchester, England in the lyrics of "Let the Sunshine In/the Flesh Failures":

    We starve-look
    At one another
    Short of breath
    Walking proudly in our winter coats
    Wearing smells from lavatories
    Facing a dying nation
    Of moving paper fantasy
    Listening for the new told lies
    With supreme visions of lonely tunes
    Somewhere
    Inside something there is a rush of
    Greatness
    Who knows what stands in front of
    Our lives
    I fashion my future on films in space
    Silence
    Tells me secretly
    Everything
    Everything
    Manchester England England
    Manchester England England
    Eyes look your last
    Across the Atlantic Sea
    Arms take your last
    embrace
    And I'm a genius genius
    And lips oh you the
    doors of breath
    I believe in God
    Seal with a righteous kiss
    And I believe that God believes in Claude
    Seal with a righteous kiss
    That's me, that's me, that's me
    The rest is silence
    The rest is silence
    The rest is silence
    [Singing]
    Our space songs on a spider web sitar
    Life is around you and in you
    Answer for Timothy Leary, dearie
    Let the sunshine
    Let the sunshine in
    The sunshine in
    Let the sunshine
    Let the sunshine in
    The sunshine in
    Let the sunshine
    Let the sunshine in
    The sun shine in...

  5. #5
    Didn't know it was Marv...that's some heavy lyric.
    Amazing coincidence re our posts, but I went to my local library to pay a small fine on an overdue book, and I spotted a leaflet advertising guided walking tours around Manchester.

    I think I will have a go at some of these ....I can always finish off with a beer.

    Here is the web site:

    Www.newmanchesterwalks.com

  6. #6
    Marv
    The answer to why it mentions Manchester in the lyrics is here:

    https://www.quora.com/In-the-movie-H...to-Vietnam-war

  7. #7
    Marv, there's a song in Hair apparently , called "Manchester England", repeated later in LTSI.
    Must admit I don't know the reasoning. Quite a few Google answers regarding this.

  8. #8
    http://www.michaelbutler.com/hair/ho...ottmiller.html

    This sort of explains Hair..heavy stuff...but the Manchester part refers to Claude...but WHY is not clear , at least to me.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Didn't know it was Marv...that's some heavy lyric.
    Amazing coincidence re our posts, but I went to my local library to pay a small fine on an overdue book, and I spotted a leaflet advertising guided walking tours around Manchester.

    I think I will have a go at some of these ....I can always finish off with a beer.

    Here is the web site:

    Www.newmanchesterwalks.com
    It was a strange and very dark song (no pun intended "Let The Sunshine In/The Flesh Failures"). I first heard it as a kid on my parents soundtrack to the play "Hair". I never understood that part of the song either.


    Thank you for that link. I do plan on visiting Manchester one day, even if I never retire LOL! Do you guys typically call "beer" beer or is it also referred to as a "brew"? I get confused because on Coronation Street, I had always assumed that a "brew" meant a cup of coffee.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Marv, there's a song in Hair apparently , called "Manchester England", repeated later in LTSI.
    Must admit I don't know the reasoning. Quite a few Google answers regarding this.
    Snakepit, I did not remember that. I was going on my memory of hearing this music back when I was 9 or 10 years old. Thank you.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Marv
    The answer to why it mentions Manchester in the lyrics is here:

    https://www.quora.com/In-the-movie-H...to-Vietnam-war
    Hey check out the original cast in Toronto performing the song here:


  12. #12
    Yes generally we order a beer, or lager. Most people now drink lager.
    Beer( Bitter, Mild), which people of my generation ( in rovers say) is not as popular with younger folk.
    However, what is termed "Real Ale" beer is very popular as a ' specialized' form of drinking.
    Breweries , small in size, specialize in strong and varied flavours...a bit of a cult in some form.

    A 'brew' would be mainly tea....people of my generation offer anybody who comes to visit a 'brew'.
    A 'brew' is universally used to solve all manner of problems..e.g. "My husband has run off with her next door"..." Oh poor luv..have a brew ( or cuppa...cup of tea).
    Also , workmen love to knock off and have a brew....very regularly.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Yes generally we order a beer, or lager. Most people now drink lager.
    Beer( Bitter, Mild), which people of my generation ( in rovers say) is not as popular with younger folk.
    However, what is termed "Real Ale" beer is very popular as a ' specialized' form of drinking.
    Breweries , small in size, specialize in strong and varied flavours...a bit of a cult in some form.

    A 'brew' would be mainly tea....people of my generation offer anybody who comes to visit a 'brew'.
    A 'brew' is universally used to solve all manner of problems..e.g. "My husband has run off with her next door"..." Oh poor luv..have a brew ( or cuppa...cup of tea).
    Also , workmen love to knock off and have a brew....very regularly.
    Martha Reeves is a now a regular drinker of Guinness Stout. I love Bass Ale and many Canadian beers.

    We, in America need to replace drinking so much bottled water with drinking more tea......period!

  14. #14
    Snakepit, does Manchester have a subway system?

  15. #15
    Guinness is popular with older folk like me. Like one myself, usually down the 'local' pub when watching football on TV. Irish pubs are popular in UK city centres... Selling Guinness of course.
    Famously, the first episodes of CS featured 3 old ladies who drank a half of milk stout.. (Ena Sharples, Martha Longhurst and Minnie Caldwell) in the Rovers.

    Manchester does not have a subway, but we have a tram system running on large sections of old railway lines. Over the last few years , the transport authority have done a good job in linking large areas of Greater Manchester ( central and out lying towns) into the system, took years to do but it is pretty good.
    The trouble is a complicated fare system that is hard to fathom. The Major is on a platform to revise and simplify all this....but don't hold your breath.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Martha Reeves is a now a regular drinker of Guinness Stout. I love Bass Ale and many Canadian beers.

    We, in America need to replace drinking so much bottled water with drinking more tea......period!
    You know what W.C. Fields said.." Don't drink water, fish make love in it"

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Guinness is popular with older folk like me. Like one myself, usually down the 'local' pub when watching football on TV. Irish pubs are popular in UK city centres... Selling Guinness of course.
    Famously, the first episodes of CS featured 3 old ladies who drank a half of milk stout.. (Ena Sharples, Martha Longhurst and Minnie Caldwell) in the Rovers.

    Manchester does not have a subway, but we have a tram system running on large sections of old railway lines. Over the last few years , the transport authority have done a good job in linking large areas of Greater Manchester ( central and out lying towns) into the system, took years to do but it is pretty good.
    The trouble is a complicated fare system that is hard to fathom. The Major is on a platform to revise and simplify all this....but don't hold your breath.
    I am sure it is still cheaper than what I pay each day to go into Manhattan. $30 USD roundtrip (more during "Peak Times"). I remember the big Tram crash on Corrie about 10 years ago. It was awful! I like that Manchester and from what I've seen from photos, that they kept many of their older buildings. We tear down our history here in the US daily!

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    You know what W.C. Fields said.." Don't drink water, fish make love in it"
    Ugh, in a way that's gross if you take what he said literally. LOL!!!!

  19. #19
    The problem is the sheer number of fares and different bus/rail companies.
    We had a fairly universal bus system but then it was all privatised (Deregulation) and lots of bus companies competed for routes. So tickets for one line won't work on another.
    There are numerous ticket options and you can get good deals.
    But the transport authority responsible do not get the message out to people.
    Numerous good value options are on sale, but the outlets that sell them ( corner shops) are not taught how to sell them…....and bus drivers have so many options , they usually don't know what is available.
    The traveller has to really work hard to fathom it all out.
    I think a return tram journey from my home to town ( we call central M/cr " Town") about 4 miles is 4.
    I use a ticket available to Seniors/pensioners which covers bus, tram and train for Greater Manchester and beyond...8.50....fantastic value.
    We need a similar plan that works in London..an Oyster card...all purpose ticket. Our Mayor is talking about this.
    Last edited by snakepit; 10-23-2018 at 07:25 PM.

  20. #20
    We have a lot of older buildings, but cities such as Leeds and Liverpool are great too.
    Manchester was bombed quite heavily in the second world war, so lots of good buildings were lost.
    However, a monstrous shopping arcade ( mall) was built in the 70s and that destroyed a lot of great buildings....the outer building looked like the biggest toilet wall in the world.
    Ironically , the IRA bombing did us a favour, and the part of Manchester is a lot better now.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    We have a lot of older buildings, but cities such as Leeds and Liverpool are great too.
    Manchester was bombed quite heavily in the second world war, so lots of good buildings were lost.
    However, a monstrous shopping arcade ( mall) was built in the 70s and that destroyed a lot of great buildings....the outer building looked like the biggest toilet wall in the world.
    Ironically , the IRA bombing did us a favour, and the part of Manchester is a lot better now.
    There are certain cities in the U.S. that retain their old, historical buildings such as Boston and many in NYC. They just build next to or around them. Cities in the Midwest, tears everything down over 40-50 years old it seems.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    The problem is the sheer number of fares and different bus/rail companies.
    We had a fairly universal bus system but then it was all privatised (Deregulation) and lots of bus companies competed for routes. So tickets for one line won't work on another.
    There are numerous ticket options and you can get good deals.
    But the transport authority responsible do not get the message out to people.
    Numerous good value options are on sale, but the outlets that sell them ( corner shops) are not taught how to sell them…....and bus drivers have so many options , they usually don't know what is available.
    The traveller has to really work hard to fathom it all out.
    I think a return tram journey from my home to town ( we call central M/cr " Town") about 4 miles is 4.
    I use a ticket available to Seniors/pensioners which covers bus, tram and train for Greater Manchester and beyond...8.50....fantastic value.
    We need a similar plan that works in London..an Oyster card...all purpose ticket. Our Mayor is talking about this.
    That all sounds very complicated.

  23. #23
    On the 2 occasions I've been to Manhattan, I used the subway and bought a Metro card with 10 journeys loaded....worked very well.
    Do you work/travel uptown, mid town or financial district.
    Would love to return but Mrs Snakepit won't get on a plane.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    On the 2 occasions I've been to Manhattan, I used the subway and bought a Metro card with 10 journeys loaded....worked very well.
    Do you work/travel uptown, mid town or financial district.
    Would love to return but Mrs Snakepit won't get on a plane.
    Mid-town,but I am doing more telecommuting now.

  25. #25
    Hi Marv.

    I stayed at 48th and 52nd Street on my two trips.
    First hotel was close to the Brill Building, and 1650 Broadway....USA music history there!

  26. #26
    Here's the wreb site of the local newspaper Manchester Evening News
    https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/

    It's not great to be honest...but you may find it interesting...Corrie pops up quite often

  27. #27

    Manchester

    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I am sure it is still cheaper than what I pay each day to go into Manhattan. $30 USD roundtrip (more during "Peak Times"). I remember the big Tram crash on Corrie about 10 years ago. It was awful! I like that Manchester and from what I've seen from photos, that they kept many of their older buildings. We tear down our history here in the US daily!
    It's interesting that you both have been chatting about Manchester. At this time, I'll not go into too many details (I think they're interesting, but others perhaps won't). I worked for a long time (before I became a Police Officer) in Manchester at the University. After the tram system commenced, I used to try to use it all the time for work, but the tram was always full - so I decided the car was easier. The tram system is clean, efficient and punctual. The downside is that there aren't enough of them in the peak times (one every 5 minutes or so).

    Manchester is an amazing city - within a short distance you have so many facilities / sites to visit. The Commonwealth Games were held, and was an incredible success for the city. The rebuilding of the city after the IRA bomb was astonishing - and that event brought the whole city together in a way that nothing else ever has done.

    Naturally I'm biased as the founder of computers was based at the University (I'm far too young to remember him). If you ever have the opportunity to visit (especially Marv) - please do. Although don't expect it to be like Coronation Street (which I call Constipation Street) - it's a much more vibrant and inspirational city.

  28. #28
    Gordy Hunk..eh up!.
    Thanks for popping in to this thread.
    Agree with what you say, and any points you have , please get involved.
    I worked for the City Council for 15 years. The city centre had changed a lot since I left that job.
    Still pass through regularly.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Hi Marv.

    I stayed at 48th and 52nd Street on my two trips.
    First hotel was close to the Brill Building, and 1650 Broadway....USA music history there!
    A tremendous amount of American music history there in that area. That was a part of what was called "Tin Pan Alley". That is where a great of deal of popular music was created in the the late 19th and 20th century. Just like in Detroit, I and most New Yorkers just walk by or ride through that area and never thinking about it's significance.

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by gordy_hunk View Post
    It's interesting that you both have been chatting about Manchester. At this time, I'll not go into too many details (I think they're interesting, but others perhaps won't). I worked for a long time (before I became a Police Officer) in Manchester at the University. After the tram system commenced, I used to try to use it all the time for work, but the tram was always full - so I decided the car was easier. The tram system is clean, efficient and punctual. The downside is that there aren't enough of them in the peak times (one every 5 minutes or so).

    Manchester is an amazing city - within a short distance you have so many facilities / sites to visit. The Commonwealth Games were held, and was an incredible success for the city. The rebuilding of the city after the IRA bomb was astonishing - and that event brought the whole city together in a way that nothing else ever has done.

    Naturally I'm biased as the founder of computers was based at the University (I'm far too young to remember him). If you ever have the opportunity to visit (especially Marv) - please do. Although don't expect it to be like Coronation Street (which I call Constipation Street) - it's a much more vibrant and inspirational city.
    Gordy_hunk, I do plan to visit there one day (and you leave my Coronation Street alone!LOL!). I really want to see the older neighborhoods. The ones that may still exist from 100 years ago or more. I am anxious to meet people from there and just talk. I was like this about Quebec City before I went there. I did not know about the IRA bombing, but I do remember many news reports about their activities back in the 70s.

  31. #31
    There are still areas outside the centre that have the type of terrace houses/ streets that would look like those on Corrie.
    Indeed I lived on such a street until I was 18, and all that area was demolished for a replacement housing scheme. But terrace streets still exist in districts of the City.

    Here's some details of the IRA bombing in 1996.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Manchester_bombing

  32. #32
    The photo of Corporation Street shows the shopping arcade/mall that was a very unpopular eyesore built in the 1970's....Manchester Arndale.
    The rebuilding of this centre is a huge improvement and now is a trendy area.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Here's the wreb site of the local newspaper Manchester Evening News
    https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/

    It's not great to be honest...but you may find it interesting...Corrie pops up quite often
    Thank you for this Snakepit!

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    There are still areas outside the centre that have the type of terrace houses/ streets that would look like those on Corrie.
    Indeed I lived on such a street until I was 18, and all that area was demolished for a replacement housing scheme. But terrace streets still exist in districts of the City.

    Here's some details of the IRA bombing in 1996.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Manchester_bombing
    You are really helping me out here and I appreciate it. It is strange, but I have actually met people in NY since the early 2000's that supported the IRA. One guy even knew that guy Gerry Adams. You meet all kinds of people when drinking during Happy Hour.

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    The photo of Corporation Street shows the shopping arcade/mall that was a very unpopular eyesore built in the 1970's....Manchester Arndale.
    The rebuilding of this centre is a huge improvement and now is a trendy area.
    Did many people get hurt during that bombing?

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    There are still areas outside the centre that have the type of terrace houses/ streets that would look like those on Corrie.
    Indeed I lived on such a street until I was 18, and all that area was demolished for a replacement housing scheme. But terrace streets still exist in districts of the City.

    Here's some details of the IRA bombing in 1996.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Manchester_bombing
    I definitely want to see the terrace houses. Do you remember the film, "To Sir with Love"?

  37. #37
    No casualties but a lot of injuries....the IRA gave advance warning so the streets were cleared in the main.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manc..._Arena_bombing

    We had a suicide bombing last year..see above ..23 killed, many injured.

  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I definitely want to see the terrace houses. Do you remember the film, "To Sir with Love"?
    Yes I have seen the film..I think it is London based. If you can get hold of the film " A taste of honey", that is filmed RIGHT in the original Corrie area...

  39. #39
    http://www.manchester-forum.co.uk/in...?topic=7324.60

    I hope this photo works....I lived two streets away from here!

  40. #40
    Marv

    This was my street...my house is on here somewhere, but need to think about where!
    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/Resu...ption=Anywhere

  41. #41
    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/web/...e&refirn=38152

    I think my house was second from left...1968.
    Can't believe it.....memory plays tricks. When this was taken I was probably in the front room playing my latest Motown purchase.

  42. #42
    Strike that...THIS is my house...second from left behind the lamp post.
    We used to play football on the large brick wall..."wally" ...kicking into goals chalked on the wall. The householders used to complain about the ball thudding against wall....
    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/web/...e&refirn=38151

  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Strike that...THIS is my house...second from left behind the lamp post.
    We used to play football on the large brick wall..."wally" ...kicking into goals chalked on the wall. The householders used to complain about the ball thudding against wall....
    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/web/...e&refirn=38151
    Snakepit! Yes! That is what I want to see. The homes and neighborhoods of regular people who grew up there. We too use to play football (American football) in the streets where we lived. Great childhood memories.

  44. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Yes I have seen the film..I think it is London based. If you can get hold of the film " A taste of honey", that is filmed RIGHT in the original Corrie area...
    I am going to look for that movie and thank you!

  45. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Snakepit! Yes! That is what I want to see. The homes and neighborhoods of regular people who grew up there. We too use to play football (American football) in the streets where we lived. Great childhood memories.
    My house and all the surrounding houses were demolished in 1973 or thereabouts. But there are still terraced streets to be found.

  46. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    My house and all the surrounding houses were demolished in 1973 or thereabouts. But there are still terraced streets to be found.
    The apartment building we lived in in 1963-64 and where we saw the Beatles on Ed Sullivan has been demolished. It was 100 years old when we moved into it in the sixties.

  47. #47
    I saw a TV show recently about the Beatles on Ed Sullivan..Jan 64 I think.
    It was mainly about the issue of an LP on Capitol....and how previous Beatles tracks had come out on Swan in Philly and Vee Jay I think, as nobody wanted the early stuff.

  48. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    The apartment building we lived in in 1963-64 and where we saw the Beatles on Ed Sullivan has been demolished. It was 100 years old when we moved into it in the sixties.
    Did you live in Detroit then?
    I visited Detroit in 1994
    Last edited by snakepit; 10-25-2018 at 05:13 PM.

  49. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    I saw a TV show recently about the Beatles on Ed Sullivan..Jan 64 I think.
    It was mainly about the issue of an LP on Capitol....and how previous Beatles tracks had come out on Swan in Philly and Vee Jay I think, as nobody wanted the early stuff.
    I never knew they had anything released on Swan, but I knew all about them being on Vee-Jay out of Chicago.

  50. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by snakepit View Post
    Did you live in Detroit then?
    I visited Detroit in 1994
    No, we were on Irving Street in Toledo, Oh then. About 45 miles south of Detroit.

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