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  1. #1

    Where Did Our Love Go vs Too Many Fish

    Forgive me if I'm not posting this in the right part of the forum; since it concerns the Supremes and Marvelettes, I'll try here:

    The Marvelettes turned down "Where Did Our Love Go?" for "Too Many Fish in the Sea".

    Motown Myth?

    We've all heard the story: the Marvelettes turned down WDOLG to record, instead, TMFITS.

    Some say this is myth. Some say there's truth to this. This is what I don't understand:

    Where Did Our Love Go was recorded by the Supremes in April, 1964 and released in June, 1964.

    Too Many Fish wasn't recorded until September, 1964 and released in October, 1964.

    IF the Marvelettes indeed turned down WDOLG for TMFITS, why did it take almost 6 months for them to record it?

  2. #2
    Yes Mary, it's both interesting and rather curious, isn't it.

    I can't exactly recall if this story has been recounted ever since 1964 (I tend to feel not?) or has been reported in subsequent years.

    You would think The Marvelettes would say they had turned down 'Where Did Our Love Go' in favour of 'You're My Remedy', as that song was completed March 25th 1964, and released June 8th.

    I can only suppose that, if true, they had 'WDOLG' played for them, but it didn't grab them as much as other songs offered. (though I thought one of the Holland brothers has said 'WDOLG' was only ever intended for The Supremes, and lead for either Diana or Mary?)

    To me, there's a whole lot of difference between declining an offer, and feeling unable to accept it.

    If it's true The Marvelettes were indeed offered 'WDOLG', I would guess they simply and positively preferred other songs, and went on to record them. As 'WDOLG' was not immediately one of them, it was then offered to The Supremes.

    If it were possible that any act at Motown did indeed have any say in which songs they recorded, any decision by The Marvelettes would have prevailed over The Supremes at that particular time....unless, of course, Berry Gordy were to instruct otherwise.

    I can only assume that because 'WDOLG' then became a very big hit, and 'Too Many Fish In The Sea' was subsequently a bigger hit for The Marvelettes than 'You're My Remedy', there is both truth and myth to this story, resulting in a simple blurring of the facts, over a period of half a century?
    Last edited by westgrandboulevard; 08-02-2018 at 04:26 AM.

  3. #3
    In Mark Ribowsky's book on the Supremes (which tends to take Motown myths and run with them), both Brian and Eddie Holland deny the story that "Where Did Our Love Go" was initially intended for the Marvelettes.
    Brian Holland: "No, we wanted that for the Supremes. Because we had already established a hit with them, a semi-hit, let's say, and we wanted to take them to the next level."
    Eddie Holland: "Yeah, we wanted to come up with something different, something that hadn't been doen with them. And it was a really different kind of song. Well, so what? Different is good. Shit, we knew the song was a No. 1 hit from the get-go."

    Of course, they are also speaking in hindsight, but it does make sense. It also makes sense that Motown might have introduced the rejection-of-the-song myth to emphasize and highlight the song's "surprise" success. It is a good story to tell: a song that everybody rejects except by the no-hit Supremes who record the song reluctantly becomes one of the biggest hit records of its time, turning the Supremes into superstars.

  4. #4
    Absolutely.

    There's more to running a record company than simply making recordings.

    To become a success, and then to maintain a high level of success, there's also the publicity required to promote both the recordings, and the record company.

    Take a fact or two about the people concerned, then spin a story around them in a positive light.....etc, etc..

  5. #5
    I posted this some days back in the ONE BAD APPLE myth thread:


    It is interesting to hear the various points of view (re WDOLG). Recently, Eddie Holland has said that the song was always meant for the Supremes. But Lamont Dozier was quoted as saying that he cut the track low because it was meant for Gladys and the Marvelettes. He even went on to say that he was disappointed that the Marvelettes didn't like it because now he was stuck with the costs of recording the track.

    I also remember reading that when Berry heard the song, he told HDH that it might go Top 40 or Top 20, but not number one.

    In any event, it certainly is a great record, regardless of how it came together.

  6. #6
    Didn't Gladys or Kat say in a interview that they passed on "Where Did Our Love Go?" And I believe Cal of the Velvelettes one time said they were considered for the song.

    One could assume "Where Did Our Love Go" was cut in a lower key because they originally agreed Mary was going to sing lead? Is it far fetched to think that could be a possibility?

    I find it fascinating these stories and perspectives are all different from the people who were directly involved. It makes it harder to get to the bottom of it and know the real truth. Look at "It's The Same Old Song." Duke has said the song was written, recorded, and released within a matter of days, but here we see the track was cut beforehand and that the song had been written for the Supremes. The Supremes track was cut in April 1965 - a full 3 months before the Four Tops' version.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by bradsupremes View Post
    Didn't Gladys or Kat say in a interview that they passed on "Where Did Our Love Go?" And I believe Cal of the Velvelettes one time said they were considered for the song.

    One could assume "Where Did Our Love Go" was cut in a lower key because they originally agreed Mary was going to sing lead? Is it far fetched to think that could be a possibility?

    I find it fascinating these stories and perspectives are all different from the people who were directly involved. It makes it harder to get to the bottom of it and know the real truth. Look at "It's The Same Old Song." Duke has said the song was written, recorded, and released within a matter of days, but here we see the track was cut beforehand and that the song had been written for the Supremes. The Supremes track was cut in April 1965 - a full 3 months before the Four Tops' version.
    Gladys has definitely said they passed on WDOLG. She said something like the guys brought them WDOLG and TMFITS at the same time and they passed on the former because it had no melody but that they liked the latter with the bongos and everything.

    I also recall an interview with Wanda where she mentions passing on it, although I think they might have said it was BABY LOVE.

    I must admit that I think it is far-fetched to think that Mary would have been given the lead on it. By this point, Diana had already been designated as the lead singer. She had been the lead on every single except POPCORN to this point. I don't have any access to recording logs so I don't know how many Flo or Mary leads were still taking place by this point. But giving a full lead to Mary on a potential single, especially after the group had just hit the Top 30 with LOVELIGHT doesn't make sense to me, even if Eddie Holland might have wanted it.
    Last edited by reese; 08-02-2018 at 10:51 AM.

  8. #8
    yeah i think the whole "we passed on WDOLG cuz it sucked and refused to sing it" is absolutely a myth. none of the artists had that level of authority at Motown during the 60s. And the marvelettes frankly weren't even top notch on the totem pole any longer by 64. they hadn't had a major hit since mid 62. so they were in no position to try and play diva.

    whether it was Too Many Fish or Remedy, i've always assumed that they had a selection of songs to try and get through and too little time scheduled in the studio to record everything. so the producers asked which they wanted to do first. and they selected the nonWDOLG song

    but frankly even that is doubtful as these were produced by different producers. HDH for WDOLG, Whitfield for Fish and Robinson for Remedy. Given the rising clout of HDH with their successes with Heatwave, Locking up my heart, Come and get these memories, mickey's monkey, can i get a witness, you've lost the sweetest boy, quicksand, when the lovelight (all from 63), i find it a bit hard to believe that the new-boy Whitfield could have squeezed them out of potential studio time with ANY motown recording artist.

  9. #9
    I also remember the interview where Gladys said they passed on WDOLG because the instrumentation and backing seemed so tame, but they liked TMFITS because it had the bongos and all that. I think she said it reminded her of music from her heritage (Trinidad? Jamaica? I'm sorry I don't remember now). I don't remember what book it's from, but I'm pretty sure it's not Marc Taylor's book as Gladys didn't contribute much to that one.

    The book 'Girl Groups' which contains many errors in the chapter on Motown claims it was "Baby Love" they passed on.

    I think either Supremes song could have been performed well with Wanda in the lead, but certainly TMFITS was a great fit for the Marvs and absolutely suited to Gladys' voice.

  10. #10
    Kat said they never were given that song but said they wouldn't have sung it anyway because, in her words (I'm strongly paraphrasing here because I forgot what she said verbatim), "we did better with uptempo songs".

    It's just a Motown myth that has erroneously been presented as fact for too long and I wish that it stops spreading.

  11. #11
    In Marc Taylor's book Gladys recalled that it was most definitely offered to the Marvelettes first who passed on it in favour of 'Fish'.It would have been a hit for the Marvelettes but how big we will never know. History would not have altered much even if they had recorded it as Gordy was going to get a #1 on the Supremes come hell or high water.

  12. #12
    Mary Wells always said she recorded songs that she liked, she did not pick what was released or A side, B side but she picked songs that she liked then she & Smokey worked them out on the piano. I do remember Wanda saying they picked "Too Many Fish..." over "Baby Love" and I remember HDH changing the beginning of the track of "Baby Love" to make it a Supremes release. These artists recorded so much that its understandable they would get tracks confused.

  13. #13
    Guess Gladys and Kat can't come to an agreement about WDOLG...

    Gladys said the song was first presented to them and Kat said "no it wasn't".

    So I guess the truth is in the middle somewhere.

  14. #14
    I do remember Lamont Dozier saying the song was first presented to the Marvelettes , who were not thrilled with it. He said it was in Gladys' key. Yep, somewhere in the middle.

  15. #15
    Right and the Hollands were like "huh? No it wasn't." So yeah, don't think we'll ever get the full deets. BUT I still believe it was a myth that it was meant to be a Marvelettes song but I'm sure it was played to them and they asked if they wanted to do it and they said "no". I also don't think they regretted turning it down if that was the case. Too Many Fish, its low top 40 pop standing beside, is a great classic.

  16. #16
    In the words of Lamont Dozier:
    "I went into the studio with Brian and we cut a track for The Marvelettes. They hated the song and refused to sing it. We were stuck with the track and if we didn't record it on some artist we'd be charged for having an unfinished track. I looked on the artist roster and at the bottom of the list was my salvation, the supremes. They also hated the song and didn't want to sing it, but they gave in and recorded it. Diana's anger was just what the song needed to take it to number one."

    I condensed his statement so it wouldn't be so lengthy, but this is his side of the story. Even in interviews the story stays the same. I think it all boils down to memory and what someone wants you to know. I'm going to go with Lamont here on The Marvelettes being their first choice.

    Another thing I would like to note is that as much as I love the Hollands,it seems they like to take most of the credit for what they did. Lamont seems to tell it like it is and be more direct and honest. I remember in the Mark Ribowsky book that was referenced to in another post where Brian said that he told James Jamerson exactly what to do on bass. When Mark relayed these statements to Jack Ashford he couldn't believe what he was hearing. Then when Lamont was interviewed later, he stated that he would lay the melody and basic idea out for Jamerson and he would add his bass ideas to make it stronger. That's not direct instruction. Brian worked with Benny more or less on the back beat.

    I do believe that The Marvelettes were considered initially. It was all in the plan of GOD that The Supremes would get the song. They paid their dues and it was their time. Period.

  17. #17
    "Too Many Fish..." was a GREAT record and deserved better then #25 Hot 100. I never remember seeing a Billboard or Cash Box promotion ad for it. I thought it was HUGE as you heard it on all the POP stations in Florida at the time. My 45 that I bought new at an actual record store said "Two Many Fish In the Sea", in the run off grooves it was pressed at Nashville Metra where most of my Motown 45's usually were.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by motony View Post
    "Too Many Fish..." was a GREAT record and deserved better then #25 Hot 100. I never remember seeing a Billboard or Cash Box promotion ad for it. I thought it was HUGE as you heard it on all the POP stations in Florida at the time. My 45 that I bought new at an actual record store said "Two Many Fish In the Sea", in the run off grooves it was pressed at Nashville Metra where most of my Motown 45's usually were.
    I totally agree! A great performance by the girls and fantastic backing by the Funk Bros. I was always trying to figure out who sang each of the "short ones, tall ones, fine one, kind ones." The only one I was positive of was Wanda who sang "kind ones." A great and fun effect which gave a really clever hook to the song.

  19. #19
    it is a stellar record and really didn't achieve the chart success it deserved. an awesome groove. it's one i hit repeat on again and again

    i believe on the chorus it's Gladys, Georganna, Kathryn, Wanda

    Wanda also has the brief lead line leading into the chorus of "Because there's..."

    i do think the andantes are on this too as the harmonies are superb and have a polish not common to most of their previous work

  20. #20
    Thanks sup_fan! K

  21. #21
    I can see the Marvelettes not liking Where Did Our Love Go as well as the Supremes

    It works because I’d Dianas vocal and the instrumentation in the studio - but it can also sound mighty lean live

  22. #22
    Diana still does the song in concert, doesn't she? She probably LOVES it now lmao

  23. Well here is something I recall reading a few decades ago in a book on Motown (wish I could remember which one); I believe it was Lamont Dozier (and I'm really fuzzy on that too) who said the song was written with The Marvelettes in mind. What really grabbed me was that he said they were doing songs for an upcoming album and they felt it would be a good track for it. I was thinking WHAT album? The Marvelettes went for quite a spell before getting that Greatest Hits album, so that remark really stuck with me all these years. If I ever find that book and quote, I'll mention it here, but still, that was a heck of a statement and the first I had ever heard that WDOLG was intended for The Marvelettes. He even made the remark about it being recorded in a key for Gladys Horton. So here we are with yet another spoke in the wheel of confusion.

  24. #24
    I believe the myth. It sounds exactly like it was crafted for Wanda. I also believe that Lamont may have played it for several Marvelettes who said, ‘yuck!” It’s not like all 5 girls traveled as a pack. Maybe Kat hadn’t arrived yet. There may very well have been an album in the works and abandoned when they couldn’t get a hit to put on it. I totally believe that Lamont wanted to bill some act for the session - as this was done lot - just ask Brenda Holloway. That’s why there is so much vaulted product: producers could play around in the studio and then stick the cost on an act - ANY act.

    I dont believe that Mary was ever considered for the lead by anyone - except Eddie as Berry did not like her voice and just 6 months before declared Diana sole lead singer. One take and they’d have known Mary didn’t have the chops to get a hit on that anyway - as her voice was not melodious when she sang softly as required for WDOLG- so Diana would have wound up doing it anyway with Mary doing what she did best for pop songs: provide a rich, layered background.

  25. #25
    I’ve never understood why people think TMFITS ”should” have been a huge hit. Yes, It’s a killer track and her vocal is mostly spot on, but it’s old fashioned girl group music when it was quickly becoming pass with the advent of The British Invasion and more sophisticated pop and Motown sounds. What killed it, I believe, is the use of 4 voices in the chorus - it sounds rinky-dink like four kids from around the block getting to take turns. I think without that, it would have notched another ten points at least, but it just reinforced the old sound. Also, Gladys’ voice, while expressive, isn’t that radio friendly. Postman was not a hit because of her distinct vocal - it was good, certainly, but the song is just a great song also and I think any decent vocalist would have hit with it.

  26. #26
    ^



    Oh yeah!

    I forgot this was the year of the British Invasion...

  27. #27
    Nice thread.
    Informative.

  28. #28
    Just my 2 cents about WDOLG and everyone wanting to turn it down.
    Honestly, I don't think the Supremes would have wanted to turn down anything. If they could sing Breath Taking Guy then WDOLG should have been heaven sent. Flo has said on several occasions it was her favorite song.
    The only way I would believe if the song was offered to the Marvelettes is if something surfaced in the vaults.

  29. #29
    Mary often says that compared to the Vandellas song she felt it was too light.

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by captainjames View Post
    Just my 2 cents about WDOLG and everyone wanting to turn it down.
    Honestly, I don't think the Supremes would have wanted to turn down anything. If they could sing Breath Taking Guy then WDOLG should have been heaven sent. Flo has said on several occasions it was her favorite song.
    The only way I would believe if the song was offered to the Marvelettes is if something surfaced in the vaults.
    Initially, Flo said she wanted a song like Please Mr. Postman lol

    But it was like three years deep and that sound on Postman was starting to lose its flavor with pop audiences.

    WDOLG turned out to be the perfect song for them. The Supremes were no Marvelettes or Vandellas so they had to find their place and with WDOLG, they finally did but it still took some getting used to. By the time Baby Love, Come See About Me and Stop! In the Name of Love came about, they were soaring past everyone after that.

  31. #31
    The Supremes achieving such crossover status is really underestimated these days, I think, when artists frequently appear with artists from other musical backgrounds and where collaborations and "crossover" has almost become a cliche.

    I know I've mentioned this on SDF before, but I remember my grandmother, a naturalized American citizen who learned English as a second language, telling my mother when the Supremes were on Ed Sullivan, "I don't know why, but I just love those 3 girls!" That they would appeal to someone like my precious grandma is a wonderful memory to me but also a testament to how likable the Supremes really were to what likely started out as an unintended audience for them. How smart was Berry Gordy to pick up on this and parlay their popularity into places like the Copa.
    Last edited by kenneth; 08-05-2018 at 02:02 PM.

  32. #32
    The Supremes were also a turning point when many of us who probably could only hope to see people who look like us on TV can be on it and regularly. As Oprah said, when she first saw the Supremes on TV as a 10-year-old, there was this thing black people used to say, "COLOR ON TV! COLOR ON TV!" The Supremes represented that.

    What's sad is the groups before them like the Marvelettes and Shirelles never got to do this because of those times.

  33. #33


    Was this perhaps Motown's campiest record??? I'm surprised The Weather Girls didn't think to do a revival of it !

  34. #34
    I was thinking more of this version:


  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by midnightman View Post
    The Supremes were also a turning point when many of us who probably could only hope to see people who look like us on TV can be on it and regularly. As Oprah said, when she first saw the Supremes on TV as a 10-year-old, there was this thing black people used to say, "COLOR ON TV! COLOR ON TV!" The Supremes represented that.

    What's sad is the groups before them like the Marvelettes and Shirelles never got to do this because of those times.
    But those groups didn’t have Mary’s looks, Flo’s charm or anyone to work as hard as Diana to sell that song - they were just perfect.
    I just played TMFITS - I love it but it was two years too late to hit #1. The hand claps, awkward lyrics and girl group sound just were old sounding - ditto The. Velvelettes ’ songs.

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by TheMotownManiac View Post
    But those groups didn’t have Mary’s looks, Flo’s charm or anyone to work as hard as Diana to sell that song - they were just perfect.
    I just played TMFITS - I love it but it was two years too late to hit #1. The hand claps, awkward lyrics and girl group sound just were old sounding - ditto The. Velvelettes ’ songs.
    That was actually my point lol

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by midnightman View Post
    The Supremes were also a turning point when many of us who probably could only hope to see people who look like us on TV can be on it and regularly. As Oprah said, when she first saw the Supremes on TV as a 10-year-old, there was this thing black people used to say, "COLOR ON TV! COLOR ON TV!" The Supremes represented that.

    What's sad is the groups before them like the Marvelettes and Shirelles never got to do this because of those times.
    It went "Colored people are on TV", "Colored People are on TV". Now that really happened. I can remember running in the house to watch. I can remember my parents, especially my Mom calling relatives whenever a black person was on television for more than a few moments either a musical act, a black person featured in a film or an interview with a prominent black American. I can remember all of us sitting and watching the Supremes, Temptations, Miracles, Anthony and the Imperials, James Brown whenever they were on TV. Oprah was lying and exaggerating when it came to the Supremes. She is older than me, but even I can remember many gorgeous, sophisticated black female singers and actresses on television before the Supremes made their 2nd national appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show (their first was the Steve Allen Show where I had seen Aretha Franklin way before the Supremes were on there). There were many more black female singers on television in the 50s and 60s before the Supremes came along. Heck! Hazel Scott even had her own tv show. I saw the Supremes on local Detroit TV before they were on the Sullivan Show.

  38. #38
    Here are the Shirelles on television in 1961 3 , almost 4 years before the Supremes appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show. Oprah is full of you know what! LOL!!!


  39. #39
    Never saw that. Thanks. Doris could dance!

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    It went "Colored people are on TV", "Colored People are on TV". Now that really happened. I can remember running in the house to watch. I can remember my parents, especially my Mom calling relatives whenever a black person was on television for more than a few moments either a musical act, a black person featured in a film or an interview with a prominent black American. I can remember all of us sitting and watching the Supremes, Temptations, Miracles, Anthony and the Imperials, James Brown whenever they were on TV. Oprah was lying and exaggerating when it came to the Supremes. She is older than me, but even I can remember many gorgeous, sophisticated black female singers and actresses on television before the Supremes made their 2nd national appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show (their first was the Steve Allen Show where I had seen Aretha Franklin way before the Supremes were on there). There were many more black female singers on television in the 50s and 60s before the Supremes came along. Heck! Hazel Scott even had her own tv show. I saw the Supremes on local Detroit TV before they were on the Sullivan Show.
    Also Lena Horne did a lot of guest shots as did Diahann Carrol and they were pretty glammed up. Pearl Bailey ...... on and on and on I could go.

  41. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Here are the Shirelles on television in 1961 3 , almost 4 years before the Supremes appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show. Oprah is full of you know what! LOL!!!

    hi marv is their a clip of foolish little girl or do t say goodnite u could share. Also t show the supremes breaking the band is on utube all 44 minutes as is the last hours of flo autopsey
    Last edited by franjoy56; 08-05-2018 at 10:22 PM.

  42. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by franjoy56 View Post
    hi marv is their a clip of foolish little girl or do t say goodnite u could share. Also t show the supremes breaking the band is on utube all 44 minutes as is the last hours of flo autopsey
    Fran, I don't if those songs are on youtube yet. I would love to see a video them doing "Baby It's You" that was my favorite. Yeah I got to see the shows on Youtube, thank you. These two shows from REELZ are very good in that they tell more of the true story and not just some fluff piece where everyone pretends they don't know what happened to the Supremes or why.

  43. Quote Originally Posted by kenneth View Post
    The Supremes achieving such crossover status is really underestimated these days, I think, when artists frequently appear with artists from other musical backgrounds and where collaborations and "crossover" has almost become a cliche.

    I know I've mentioned this on SDF before, but I remember my grandmother, a naturalized American citizen who learned English as a second language, telling my mother when the Supremes were on Ed Sullivan, "I don't know why, but I just love those 3 girls!" That they would appeal to someone like my precious grandma is a wonderful memory to me but also a testament to how likable the Supremes really were to what likely started out as an unintended audience for them. How smart was Berry Gordy to pick up on this and parlay their popularity into places like the Copa.
    Your memories of how your Grandmother responded to the Supremes is really the best testament to just how unique the Supremes were for the times. There are performers who can appear on television and you don't really think much about them past that appearance, but then you have artists who have such charisma and a personality that you feel drawn to them. The Supremes had that sort of charisma that grabbed people that, as you said, weren't their primary audience.

    I remember when the movie about the Mexican-American singer Selena came out with Jennifer Lopez, there was a scene between Selena and her father. He remarked with admiration how it seemed his daughter was able to break down barriers and appeal to people who would never have accepted a Mexican-American singer before in such a big way. That was such an poignant scene, because it was true. I know that a lot of us were into Selena in a way we had never seen before. I immediately thought about The Supremes. Your comment is such a great true-life example of how much the Supremes really appealed to so many.

  44. #44
    Huh?



    How did Oprah exaggerate? She was born and partially raised in the impoverished section of Mississippi! I'm not even sure Oprah's mother and relatives could've AFFORDED a TV at the time!

    She later relocated to Wisconsin with her mother when she was ten, the same year the Supremes debuted on NATIONAL TV on Ed Sullivan.

    So if that was her first memory of seeing black people on TV, then friggin' duh...


  45. #45
    @waitingwatching... how kind and thoughtful of you to say those things. Honestly you made my memories even more vivid. Thank you so much.

    Kenneth

  46. Quote Originally Posted by kenneth View Post
    @waitingwatching... how kind and thoughtful of you to say those things. Honestly you made my memories even more vivid. Thank you so much.

    Kenneth
    You're most welcome! Really, it's reading this very type of first-hand account that really shows how remarkable an impact the Supremes had on people of all kinds. And you're right, that aspect is something that I believe gets completely lost sometimes, yet it's so important to note and not lose sight of.

  47. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by kenneth View Post
    The Supremes achieving such crossover status is really underestimated these days, I think, when artists frequently appear with artists from other musical backgrounds and where collaborations and "crossover" has almost become a cliche.

    I know I've mentioned this on SDF before, but I remember my grandmother, a naturalized American citizen who learned English as a second language, telling my mother when the Supremes were on Ed Sullivan, "I don't know why, but I just love those 3 girls!" That they would appeal to someone like my precious grandma is a wonderful memory to me but also a testament to how likable the Supremes really were to what likely started out as an unintended audience for them. How smart was Berry Gordy to pick up on this and parlay their popularity into places like the Copa.
    I meant to quote on this but that is a beautiful story. This is why representation is important. The Supremes were the first examples of black girl power that crossed over well in ways the other black female celebrities never did though some did cross over if for a brief period (Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne before the Hollywood blacklisting and Eartha Kitt before she read Lady Bird Johnson lol).

  48. #48
    Thanks @midnightman. I think Grandma was as surprised by how much the Sups appealed to her as we were at the time! What an amazing time it was. Of course you never realize it when you're going through it...that all comes with hindsight later.

    Have a great day.

  49. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by kenneth View Post
    Thanks @midnightman. I think Grandma was as surprised by how much the Sups appealed to her as we were at the time! What an amazing time it was. Of course you never realize it when you're going through it...that all comes with hindsight later.

    Have a great day.
    So true. You too.

  50. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    Gladys has definitely said they passed on WDOLG. She said something like the guys brought them WDOLG and TMFITS at the same time and they passed on the former because it had no melody but that they liked the latter with the bongos and everything.

    I also recall an interview with Wanda where she mentions passing on it, although I think they might have said it was BABY LOVE.

    I must admit that I think it is far-fetched to think that Mary would have been given the lead on it. By this point, Diana had already been designated as the lead singer. She had been the lead on every single except POPCORN to this point. I don't have any access to recording logs so I don't know how many Flo or Mary leads were still taking place by this point. But giving a full lead to Mary on a potential single, especially after the group had just hit the Top 30 with LOVELIGHT doesn't make sense to me, even if Eddie Holland might have wanted it.
    You forget that every single that Diana Ross led on up to that point, except When the Lovelight..... flopped! Right after Lovelight, they released "Run,Run, Run" with Diane on lead and it also flopped. They were considering Mary for lead on "Where Did Our Love Go?". Brian Holland wanted Mary to do it, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland wanted Diane to do it. They compromised in a way which is why the finished recording sounds like almost a duet with Mary and Diane.

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