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  1. #1

    Does Anybody Here Want to Talk About Music??

    So once again the forum has erupted into it's vicious cycle of craziness perpetrated by the usual suspects who worship two former Supremes, but is there ANYBODY who wants to talk Motown music and memories?

    Tell me something, what was the moment, the song, the album, the voice, the concert, or whatever that hooked you into the Motown family of labels? At what point did you know you were a Motown fan?

  2. #2
    I can't remember ever not liking Motown.

    The first voice that attracted me (and is still my favorite) is that of Diana Ross. I have a vague memory of seeing the Supremes singing SOMEDAY WE'LL BE TOGETHER on Ed Sullivan and being told that she was leaving the group. I definitely remember my older cousin coming over and both of us watching Diana's first solo tv special. I was concentrating on Diana, and she was concentrating on the Jackson 5.

    Later that year, for Christmas, my parents bought me a little suitcase record player and along with it, a bunch of singles they had bought from the 3 for $1 bin at Woolworth's. I can't remember them all, but among them were I'M LIVIN' IN SHAME and NO MATTER WHAT SIGN YOU ARE by the Supremes, MY BABY MUST BE A MAGICIAN and THAT'S HOW HEARTACHES ARE MADE by the Marvelettes, and CARRY YOUR OWN LOAD by Jr. Walker and the All-Stars. My grandmother also bought me the DIANA! soundtrack album.

  3. #3
    Actually my first memory was when my parents used to play (and still do) Teena Marie. I fell in love with the It must be magic album and the Irons in the Fire album. And Portuguese Love is my cut.

  4. #4
    Thank you.
    Martha and The Vandellas' Nowhere to Run and the Tempts' All I Need are two of Motown's most (chart) under appreciated songs. Are there any other that were seriously overlooked?

  5. #5
    Remember the Columbia Record Club back in the 60's? My sister joined and one of the albums she purchased was The Supremes' "Where Did Our Love Go." That opened my eyes and ears to Motown in the fall of 1964 as well as it began my love affair with The Supremes. From that day forward I was hooked on Motown and began to explore all the groups. Granted, The Supremes, were my first love but before long I was digging Martha/Vandellas, Four Tops, Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Smokey/Miracles and the Marvelettes. In 1966 I was smitten with Gladys Knight and the Pips when I first heard "Everybody Needs Love." As the decade came to a close I had driven my family crazy with Motown (LOL). Fast forward to a year ago and I was given the "green light" to produce a Motown-themed radio show on our local community radio station. The shows runs for one hour every Friday night. So far I've programmed and recorded 43 shows and will do a total of 52 shows and then call it quits. Wow! What I have experienced is a rediscovery of my love for Motown. The shows have been fun to program and record and a wonderful bi-product has been a connection to a lifetime of memories with Motown. Thanks RanRan79 for the topic.

  6. #6
    I think I always liked Motown, I just didn’t know it!

    My dad loves soul music and I remember he bought The Very Best Of Marvin Gaye a few years back. I liked it, but I didn’t fall in love with Motown right there and then. It was a more gradual process. First The Supremes... then The Temptations and Four Tops... then Martha & The Vandellas, Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson... (here I think I started to actually know what Motown was!)... then Gladys & The Pips, The Elgins and Velvelettes... then Jimmy Ruffin, Marv Johnson and Edwin Starr... and then summer last year I got HOOKED for good and that’s that!!!!!

    Then came David Ruffin... The Monitors... The Originals... Junior Walker... Chuck Jackson... The Undisputed Truth... and more. I’m still discovering and I love it.
    Last edited by TomatoTom123; 10-12-2017 at 07:16 PM.

  7. #7
    Great stuff y'all! I'm an 80s kid so of course I don't know life without Motown. I heard all of the oldies on the radio and of course Motown vets like Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, the Jacksons, and Gladys Knight and the Pips were on the radio with their post Motown cuts all the time. I do remember my mother having the Street Songs album, Teena Marie's "Square Biz" 45, Diana Ross' "Touch Me In the Morning" 45, the Supremes' "I'm Gonna Let My Heart Do the Walking" 45, and the Temptations "Silent Night" 45, and probably a few more. And of course as a HUGE Michael Jackson and the Jacksons family fan, I was wild about anything the J5 did.

    But it was the Supremes who would create an unbreakable connection between me and Motown after I read Mary Wilson's first book and was curious about Florence Ballard's voice and obtained Meet the Supremes (on cassette). I was already a fan of Diana's voice, but now I was a fan of Flo's voice (both lead and background). This also caused a love in me of the original trio's overall harmony and led me to start collecting as much of their music as I could. My interests in the Supremes led me to start collecting the music of their Motown peers. So by the time I was 14 I was in full fledged Motown mode. I listened to all the stuff my friends were jamming to in the 90s but my contemporary music collection was augmented by all the Supremes albums I collected, plus stuff by Marvin Gaye, the Tempts, Martha and the Vandellas, the 4 Tops, the Miracles, and the rest of the gang.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by thanxal View Post
    Thank you.
    Martha and The Vandellas' Nowhere to Run and the Tempts' All I Need are two of Motown's most (chart) under appreciated songs. Are there any other that were seriously overlooked?
    There are tons of others Thanxal. The Tempts' "My Baby", Marvin Gaye's "You" and "Chained" (two of my favs), 4 Tops "I'm In a Different World", just to name a few.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by motownlover1964 View Post
    Thanks RanRan79 for the topic.
    No problem Motownlover! Needed to get the forum back on track. (Needed to get myself back on track too.)

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by blackguy69 View Post
    Actually my first memory was when my parents used to play (and still do) Teena Marie. I fell in love with the It must be magic album and the Irons in the Fire album. And Portuguese Love is my cut.
    BG I remember when I found out Teena was white. A neighbor had Teena's poster from Right On magazine on her wall. I was a little kid and I remember being shocked. Lol

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    So once again the forum has erupted into it's vicious cycle of craziness perpetrated by the usual suspects who worship two former Supremes, but is there ANYBODY who wants to talk Motown music and memories?

    Tell me something, what was the moment, the song, the album, the voice, the concert, or whatever that hooked you into the Motown family of labels? At what point did you know you were a Motown fan?
    For me the year was 1964 and the record was "Where Did Our Love Go" by The Supremes. That was when I first became aware of (and hooked) on The Motown Sound. And over fifty years later, I'm still hooked on it (and always will be). Let other posters debate about the foibles of the stars (and who was better and who was worse).

  12. #12
    The most poignant memory is the anticipation in the neighborhood “New Sups” for their first television appearance. People liked the idea of the group thing. I remember the lady next door stated, “honey that girl can sing”. People didnt know wht to expect but sure got the real deal! I collected as much MJC news clippings And magazine articles that would fit in the wall.

  13. #13
    The first record I bought was the 45 "Bye Bye Baby" by Mary Wells. It was a BIG hit in Miami. Hey, I just read an old interview with rocker Tom Petty (that just passed away) and he said the first record he ever bought was "Playboy" by the Marvelettes...I thought that was pretty cool.

  14. #14
    I started listening to Motown in the early 70s when I was about 12, thanks to my dad's record collection. Started with the Supremes I Hear A Symphony and A Go Go albums. I played those to death. He also had 16 Big Hits Vol. 5, Junior Walker's Roadrunner, Marvelettes Greatest Hits, Vandellas Greatest Hits and a few others. I've been in love with the music ever since.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by detmotownguy View Post
    The most poignant memory is the anticipation in the neighborhood “New Sups” for their first television appearance. People liked the idea of the group thing. I remember the lady next door stated, “honey that girl can sing”. People didnt know wht to expect but sure got the real deal! I collected as much MJC news clippings And magazine articles that would fit in the wall.
    Yes, I remember the "New Supremes" with Jean Terrell being a very big deal in the Detroit/Toledo/Windsor area back at the time. They were couldn't wait for Motown for a new single so the stations were playing "Bill, When Are You Coming Back" as if were an A-side single.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by RanRan79 View Post
    Tell me something, what was the moment, the song, the album, the voice, the concert, or whatever that hooked you into the Motown family of labels? At what point did you know you were a Motown fan?
    When I was a kid I didn't know Motown from anything. I just turned on the radio and listened to whatever music came on. At that time, I was not allowed to purchase music - that was something my parents did. For Christmas, I asked my parents for a Four Seasons record. I really liked them when I heard them on the radio. Well, on Christmas morning, I saw a flat wrapped present. I knew it was a record album. I tore the paper off and it was The Four Tops Greatest Hits, the one with the silver cover. I said, "Mom, I asked for the Four Seasons!" She shrugged and explained that she knew there was a four in the name, saw that one and bought it. Needless to say, I put it on to listen and immediately fell in love with it. I had seen The Supremes on Ed Sullivan and their albums were pictured on the sleeve of this record so I asked my mother if I could get their greatest Hits. She said yes, but I had to pay for it. I took my money, went to the store and bought the Blue double album. From that day on, I was hooked. Almost every album I bought for over a year was a Motown / Tamla / Gordy album.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by thommg View Post
    When I was a kid I didn't know Motown from anything. I just turned on the radio and listened to whatever music came on. At that time, I was not allowed to purchase music - that was something my parents did. For Christmas, I asked my parents for a Four Seasons record. I really liked them when I heard them on the radio. Well, on Christmas morning, I saw a flat wrapped present. I knew it was a record album. I tore the paper off and it was The Four Tops Greatest Hits, the one with the silver cover. I said, "Mom, I asked for the Four Seasons!" She shrugged and explained that she knew there was a four in the name, saw that one and bought it. Needless to say, I put it on to listen and immediately fell in love with it. I had seen The Supremes on Ed Sullivan and their albums were pictured on the sleeve of this record so I asked my mother if I could get their greatest Hits. She said yes, but I had to pay for it. I took my money, went to the store and bought the Blue double album. From that day on, I was hooked. Almost every album I bought for over a year was a Motown / Tamla / Gordy album.
    Thommg, I just want to way I love your story of the Four Tops/Four Seasons mixup. I also would only buy Motown albums for many years after I got hooked.

  18. #18
    I totally agree with you 1000000 percent. It has gotten to the point that I don't even bother to look at postings like you referred to. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had a day without the craziness?

    Now to answer your question. In the early 1960's, I used to shop at a black record store in Harrisburg, PA. called the Turntable. Martha was the owner and it was part of her house. She lived in the back portion of the house. All her records were in shelves and unorganized but she knew where everything was located. She had a huge RCA Victor turntable that she would play the songs on. It was her suggestion for me to listen to Stubborn Kind of Fellow by Marvin Gaye. That absolutely blew my mind and she started every time I visited to play new Motown songs that were released. Shortly after that I bought from her the original Meet the Supremes (Motown 606) which today I have framed and proudly displayed along with their second album. Both are originals and not bootlegs or reissuances.
    She was very instrumental in getting me to buy Motown records. Prior to this I was buying other records but ultimately I ended up basically shedding all of my records other than Motown.

  19. #19
    This was the album that did it for me!
    Attachment 13565

  20. #20
    My mom had the supremes Where Did Our Love Go lp. It was on the self with a few other lps of theirs and various classic lps. It wasn't mixed in w my or my sisters kiddie albums. But sometimes we would play it. I remember liking all of the tunes, not just the hits. And I was mesmerized by the cover and their big hair. I would read the liner notes but couldn't reconcile that one of these three girls w huge bouffant hair was the same Diana Ross that I had also heard Upside Down from.

    I heard that song when we were living in Jakarta Indonesia in 81. Bootleg music and tapes were everywhere and from time to time we'd stop by and buy some. My older sister wanted to a cassette w Upside Down on it. We ended up w a cheap bootleg where they'd dubbed part of To Love Again lp and part of diana 1980. We'd dance around to UD and all.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by woodward View Post
    I totally agree with you 1000000 percent. It has gotten to the point that I don't even bother to look at postings like you referred to. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had a day without the craziness?

    Now to answer your question. In the early 1960's, I used to shop at a black record store in Harrisburg, PA. called the Turntable. Martha was the owner and it was part of her house. She lived in the back portion of the house. All her records were in shelves and unorganized but she knew where everything was located. She had a huge RCA Victor turntable that she would play the songs on. It was her suggestion for me to listen to Stubborn Kind of Fellow by Marvin Gaye. That absolutely blew my mind and she started every time I visited to play new Motown songs that were released. Shortly after that I bought from her the original Meet the Supremes (Motown 606) which today I have framed and proudly displayed along with their second album. Both are originals and not bootlegs or reissuances.
    She was very instrumental in getting me to buy Motown records. Prior to this I was buying other records but ultimately I ended up basically shedding all of my records other than Motown.
    Woodward have you ever been to the diner on 17th and Derry in Harrisburg?

  22. #22
    I'm loving the memories everyone!! So many interesting stories about your love of the music.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Woodward have you ever been to the diner on 17th and Derry in Harrisburg?
    Yes I have. Have you ever been to the Turntable Record Store at 1500 block of North Sixth Street? She was wonderful. Did you live in Harrisburg?

  24. #24
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    I liked Berry Gordy's work BEFORE he started Motown. I was collecting Miracles' records, and Anna Records before Motown started. As soon as I got my driver's license in 1962, I was driving to Detroit on one or two Saturdays a month, to look for records. I started collecting ALL Tamla and Motown records from late 1959, with The Miracles' "Way Over There", Barret Strong's "Money", and The Satintones' "My Beloved". By the time of Mary Wells' "Bye, Bye Baby" in 1961, I had been buying ALL Motown-related releases for 1.5 years.
    Last edited by robb_k; 10-12-2017 at 10:04 PM.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by woodward View Post
    Yes I have. Have you ever been to the Turntable Record Store at 1500 block of North Sixth Street? She was wonderful. Did you live in Harrisburg?
    I have never been to the Turntable Record Store, but I found a great used record store in Lancaster back in the 80s. I use to have breakfast at the Club Diner on 17th & Derry every Weds. morning from 1985-late 86. All the sales guys seemed to meet up there. I use to meet my old mentor George Steever there to go over our schedules for the day. May he rest in peace.

  26. #26
    The music is great.

    Yes, the personal stuff between singers is very very boring.


    edafan

  27. #27
    Well, lets see....for me it was finding my mom and dad's record collection when I was around 10 years old in the mid-1980's. My parents graduated HS in '65 and '66, but both were fans of pre British Invasion music so I started out loving Elvis, The Beach Boys, The Everly's, and my 10 year old crush, Miss Lesley Gore! I was digging the "oldies" so much my parents bought me a Dick Clark 60's compilation on cassette tapes for Christmas. This collection was very heavy in Motown music, thus my introduction to the Motown Sound. I started collecting records myself in my early teens, so added some Motown LP's and 45's over the next 20 years.

    Fast forward to 2012. Myself and a couple friends were in Dearborn for the 100th anniversary exhibit on the Titanic at the Ford Museum. After the tour I suggested if everyone was game we should go downtown to the Motown Museum. We agreed we might as well as we had time to spare. I had always wanted to visit Hitsville USA, but for some reason hadn't ever done so until this day. THIS my friends was a life changing visit for me! To stand in Studio A, the very spot where this great music I had always enjoyed was recorded was awe-inspiring. One of my favorite videos is the one of The Supremes "recording" "My World Is Empty Without You", and here I was, standing in the very spot Diana was in that film. I could just close my eyes and picture the whole scene in my head, then open my eyes and see it almost 50 years later right in front of me.

    My conversion to a Motown fan-atic was ignited. One of the first 45's I bought after visiting Hitsville was "Bye Bye Baby", as previous to my visit to the museum, I had never seen a pink label Motown 45. I'm sure I would now be considered a pretty serious Motown collector with a room full of memorabilia including records, posters, photos, original album cover artwork, and autographs, etc.

    I joined this forum because I LOVE MOTOWN MUSIC, plain and simple, and I hope to see it and it's impact on the world recognized and continued into the future. I love the music, I'm not interested in the personalities of people who made it and the things they said or did 30, 40, 50 years ago. If it weren't for the MUSIC, none of us would be on this forum, would we?
    Darin

    P.S. In the mid 90's, I finally got to meet my childhood crush Lesley Gore in person. She was very nice and signed a couple items for me, including my LP of "It's My Party". Although she wasn't the 16 year old on the cover any longer, I was still awestruck to finally see her!

  28. #28
    In Canada, Baby Love was the song that radio played; they didn't play Where Did Our Love Go as much but Baby Love was more pop and white radio loved it

    By Stop in the Name of Love Canada was sold on the Supremes and from there I learned every other Motown act. I worked in a record shop that got Cashbox and then Billboard and watched the progress of the Motown hits

    I can remember my Mother saying she did not like the
    Supremes especially that Deeana one who flips her eyelids at you

  29. #29
    I was given two transistor radios for Christmas in 1965 and I am sure I wore them both out. At the time I would not have known one record label from another one because those radios were the only connection I had to the world of music. But I soon learned where to go to shop for music and to this day, over 50 years later, I have the clearest memories in the world of where I was and what I was doing the first time I saw a certain album or heard a certain song.

    The first two 45s I ever bought were actually non-Motown. Like I said, it took a while to learn who belonged to what label. Those two were the really odd combination of Petula Clark's "My Love" and "Attack" by the Toys.

    But my tastes soon shifted to Motown and I think the "I Hear a Symphony" album was the first album I bought. Back in those days, a 45 cost about 98 cents but albums were anywhere from $2.98 to $3.98, so for me it made a lot more sense to buy albums and get more songs. I still feel that way.

    Since I had no exposure to trade magazines and of course the internet had not yet been invented (!), it was just a huge thrill to hear a great song on the radio for the first time or go into a store and see a brand new album that you had no idea was coming.

    Once I realized that girl groups were my favorite, ESPECIALLY Motown girl groups, I was in hog heaven having three great ones to choose from at any given time. Later in life, to discover how wonderful the Velvelettes were and to know that they should have been in the mix as well made it even sweeter.

    As Archie and Edith sang "Those Were the Days."

  30. #30
    For me it was watching the "Diana" tv special. I was mesmerized by Diana Ross. I was only around 10 years old.
    My friends elder brother was a big Motown fan and we began playing his records when he went out on a Saturday night. I discovered the Four Tops, Temptations , Jackson 5 etc etc and began to spend my pocket money on these singles, which progressed to the Motown chartbusters albums at Birthday and Christmas time with my extra money.
    From there it just progressed and i experienced untold joy in discovering some of the lesser known Motown artists, which i continue to do to this very day.
    Great thread by the way. Good work, and let's see how long we can keep the positive vibe going.
    Last edited by Bluebrock; 10-13-2017 at 07:37 AM. Reason: not finished post

  31. #31
    Hmmm ... honestly, probably first was Judy Garland on her CBS Sunday night show. After that 'West Side Story'. Also Eydie Gorme and other mid-late 60's Sullivan show type belters. But then soul & r&r! Janis, Diana, Aretha, Tina - probably in that order. Most frequently first on Sullivan then later on Flip Wilson, Andy Williams, and other variety shows of the time.

  32. #32
    I was given the Motown story the first decade and thought wow I remember hearing all those tracks on the radio. From time to time I would come across an album from one of the artist who appeared on those albums and would buy it. Then one day I bought Motown’s 'Big Motown Hits and Hard to find Classics Vol 1', with the likes of the Originals on it, Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers and of course David Ruffin that’s when I realised I was in love with Motown and started collecting.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by mysterysinger View Post
    This was the album that did it for me!
    Attachment 13565
    In the UK it was Motown Chartbusters vol3 that I first realised all that great music related to one record label, that was the album that gave the music its identity. My brother was given the album for Christmas 1969. After that, I asked for a Chartbusters album each Christmas and a Greatest Hits compilation. During the 70,s I was gripped and delved into the back catalogue, looking for those hidden gems on US imports.
    I'm still delving to this day and buy any new release that is Motown related.

  34. #34
    I was born in the late 80s, but my mom was born in the 50s so I grew up listening to a lot of Motown. I remember even as a kid liking "Stop! In the Name of Love", "My Guy", and "Please Mr. Postman".

    Right around the time I turned thirteen I heard "Dancing in the Street" play on an oldies station, and something clicked in my brain, and I started listening to, and reading about, anything Motown. The Supremes eventually became my favorite group, but it was really Martha and the Vandellas that turned merely listening to songs on the radio into a real hobby for me.

    When I was seventeen my voice teacher held a recital, and one of the songs I picked was "Someday We'll Be Together". I remember him very gently telling me, "This is probably the first and only time these people are going to hear a white boy sing this song, so you need to make it count." I managed to get about half the people at the recital to sing along with me.

  35. #35

    A radio and a record player

    When I was a kid, we often took a transistor radio with us so we could listen to the tunes wherever we hung out. I can remember my ears pricking up when I heard a catchy tune by what sounded like 'The Ivy Brothers'. My sister was two years older than me and she got more pocket money than I did, which meant she could afford to buy 45s. I would play some of her singles on her record player when she wasn't home and discovered that the ones I liked the best were those with the black and silver label - Marvin and Tammi's ''You Ain't Livin' Till You're Lovin' '' and ''This Old Heart Of Mine'' by those Isley Brothers, which helped me to put two and two together and realize that I was a Tamla Motown fan!.

    And so it began.....

  36. #36
    P.S. In the mid 90's, I finally got to meet my childhood crush Lesley Gore in person. She was very nice and signed a couple items for me, including my LP of "It's My Party". Although she wasn't the 16 year old on the cover any longer, I was still awestruck to finally see her![/QUOTE]


    I loved Leslie's voice. I wish I could have met her and been friends with her.

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    I liked Berry Gordy's work BEFORE he started Motown. I was collecting Miracles' records, and Anna Records before Motown started. As soon as I got my driver's license in 1962, I was driving to Detroit on one or two Saturdays a month, to look for records. I started collecting ALL Tamla and Motown records from late 1959, with The Miracles' "Way Over There", Barret Strong's "Money", and The Satintones' "My Beloved". By the time of Mary Wells' "Bye, Bye Baby" in 1961, I had been buying ALL Motown-related releases for 1.5 years.
    Wow Robb, Gordy had you hooked from the very beginning! That's fantastic!

  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Thornton View Post

    When I was seventeen my voice teacher held a recital, and one of the songs I picked was "Someday We'll Be Together". I remember him very gently telling me, "This is probably the first and only time these people are going to hear a white boy sing this song, so you need to make it count." I managed to get about half the people at the recital to sing along with me.
    Cute story Thornton. "Someday We'll Be Together" is such a great song. You definitely picked a winner.

  39. #39
    I cannot remember when I started to become a more-than-casual Motown fan, but I do remember dancing to "Jimmy Mack" around 1968 or so (I was a mere 3 years old). My mother's taste in music was wide and varied: Tom Jones, Glenn Miller, Steam, Temptations, Martha and the Vandellas, Al Green, Staples Singers, Four Tops and so many others. I guess when I got old enough to read about Motown and its stars and their music is when I got hooked. Going beyond just being a listener to reading about the unsung heroes and behind-the scenes people really pulled me in.

  40. #40
    Back in the day we kids just listened to the radio and liked all of it,we didn't know about a[motown]back then we just grooved to the sounds of-bye bye baby..way over there..money..i want a love i can see,it was all good and still is!!

  41. #41
    I became hooked on Motown at a very early age. I first saw the Supremes on Ed Sullivan in 1964, but my recollection of Motown started when I used to categorize the family's 45s by label. What I noticed was that all of the songs I liked best had "A Product of Motown Company" at the bottom and Jobete BMI as the publisher. So I started putting together Motown, Tamla, Gordy, Soul, VIP and other affiliated labels in a group separate from the Capitol, RCA and Columbia labels. When I was old enough to buy my own records (as well as gifts for birthdays and Christmas) I sought out Motown products. I still seek out Motown product.

  42. #42
    The Motown bug bit me in 1999 around the age of 14.The archival footage and the musical snippets hit me like a ton of bricks!!.Maybe three weeks after that marvelous experience I bought my first title."The Complete Motown Collection" by MEI Digital was the boxed set I found in a local record store used for a fair price.Being a responsible kid financially,I was able to purchase it right then.Funny thing was the store clerks mouths were open almost to the point of devastation.I didn't see what the big deal was,after all it was Motown.I played the stuffing out of it and duly read the booklet to gain experience behind the sounds.I was never the same."Ultimate Collection","Lost and Found","20th Century Masters",Etc.You name it and 9 chances out of 10 I have it,even the "Blue Evolution" release.I had conquered the Motown catalog so greatly that I had to extend my interests to other Detroit labels.I have about 50+ of those titles,from "The Essential Detroit Soul Collection" from 1992 to Ace/Kent's Pied Piper trilogy.I can't tell it all because i'd be typing the next 3 days, but that's my experience truncated.

  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by woodward View Post
    Yes I have. Have you ever been to the Turntable Record Store at 1500 block of North Sixth Street? She was wonderful. Did you live in Harrisburg?
    Woodward. I lived in Philly and then Valley Forge area and my work took me all over Eastern PA. I was in Harrisburg once a week, every week.

  44. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinn View Post
    The Motown bug bit me in 1999 around the age of 14.The archival footage and the musical snippets hit me like a ton of bricks!!.Maybe three weeks after that marvelous experience I bought my first title."The Complete Motown Collection" by MEI Digital was the boxed set I found in a local record store used for a fair price.Being a responsible kid financially,I was able to purchase it right then.Funny thing was the store clerks mouths were open almost to the point of devastation.I didn't see what the big deal was,after all it was Motown.I played the stuffing out of it and duly read the booklet to gain experience behind the sounds.I was never the same."Ultimate Collection","Lost and Found","20th Century Masters",Etc.You name it and 9 chances out of 10 I have it,even the "Blue Evolution" release.I had conquered the Motown catalog so greatly that I had to extend my interests to other Detroit labels.I have about 50+ of those titles,from "The Essential Detroit Soul Collection" from 1992 to Ace/Kent's Pied Piper trilogy.I can't tell it all because i'd be typing the next 3 days, but that's my experience truncated.
    That's a great story Quinn!Welcome to the forum. How nice to have a younger voice expressing their love and devotion for Motown in such an enthusiastic manner. Great to meet you.

  45. #45
    I just heard "The Way You Do the Things You Do" by the Temptations on radio station CKWW. It sounded so, so good after not hearing it for a good while. It is one of the early Temptations songs I remember as a kid. Now, anytime I hear it I cannot help but to sing along. Great stuff!

  46. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluebrock View Post
    That's a great story Quinn!Welcome to the forum. How nice to have a younger voice expressing their love and devotion for Motown in such an enthusiastic manner. Great to meet you.
    Thank you Blue,it's my pleasure to be here.I first joined in 2005 or 2006, but didn't keep up with my account information,so I returned really.So many people from that time I miss because they don't seem to be on the forum anymore.Anyway,I forgot to clarify what drew me to Hitsville and that was the Motown 40 television special.I watched a bit of it on YouTube and even if you know the information,it's still interesting.

  47. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by superlou View Post
    I started listening to Motown in the early 70s when I was about 12, thanks to my dad's record collection. Started with the Supremes I Hear A Symphony and A Go Go albums. I played those to death. He also had 16 Big Hits Vol. 5, Junior Walker's Roadrunner, Marvelettes Greatest Hits, Vandellas Greatest Hits and a few others. I've been in love with the music ever since.
    Your Dad had good taste! The first 3 LPs I ever bought were 16 Big Hits Vol 5, Vandellas Greatest Hits and the Marvelettes Greatest Hits (I think in that order). Of course, these were all oldies by then, but that's what started me collecting Motown.

    16 songs on one album (especially in the US) was extremely rare, and seemed like a good bargain. I always loved compilations since then. I read once that comps were never as popular in the US as they were in the UK, until the Now That's What I Call Music series, which kind of exploded the genre here. I'm not sure when that series started but it almost seems as if the recording industry, starting with Napster (remember them?) and then further, because of iTunes and other online services, shifted from an album oriented market back to a singles oriented market in the last 15 years or so. The industry seems to have come full circle at this time.

    I was in a used CD store recently and two 20-somethings were browsing the racks and one guy was telling his friend something like, "You really should listen to a whole album from start to finish. Somebody planned the whole album and made it to be played that way." That was music to my ears!
    Last edited by kenneth; 10-18-2017 at 12:07 PM.

  48. #48
    In early 1968, a new record store opened in the strip mall down on the main ave. by my house....I was wetting myself with anxiety waiting for opening day...it was actually a small store, and it was called Island Audio...they had ONE rack, about 5 LP slots across and about 5 up and down, and with about 100 different LPS... and a wall with a much larger selection of 8 track tapes...I purchased the DRATS 2 LP Blue LP, and my $5 bill was tape to the wall...I was the very first customer...I went there every day just to see people come in and out and what they would buy...those tapes and 45 RPM singles went out the door in much bigger quantities than the LPS

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