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Thread: Remember when?

  1. #2601
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Hey who had a gym or shop teacher who would call you..young punk,if we pissed him off,haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!
    Nope ,but they beat your ass. They were allowed to do that back then.

  2. #2602
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Nope ,but they beat your ass. They were allowed to do that back then.
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    I had a 250 lb. weightlifting Phys. Ed. teacher who had previously been a 12-year offensive lineman in The Canadian Football League. He used to give swats to the rear ends of all the boys who misbehaved in my junior high school. The wood paddle-ball paddles had 4 airholes drilled into them, so as to reduce wind resistance, so the paddle could travel faster, and deliver a harder blow. Those ill-behaved boys couldn't sit down for a week, without wincing in pain, or bring their own soft pillow to school, to sit on.

    I also had a nasty Electronics teacher who enjoyed all too much subjecting all his students to dangerous doses of electric current under high voltage, painfully shocking them, supposedly to warn them against its dangers. He lined up all his new students at the start of each class, and zapped them one by one. But, his evil grin upon administering the shocks gave him away as a sadistic, sad old man, who took despised kids, and took joy in hurting them.

    Both of those "teachers" would be languishing in prison under current Canadian law, and how it is interpreted by judges these days.
    Last edited by robb_k; 09-15-2018 at 01:14 PM.

  3. #2603
    All the boys at my junior high school learned immediately that Mr. Kelly (gym), Mr. Brown (vice-principle) and Mr. O'Brian (shop) were the heavy hitters. Mr. Brown had holes drilled into his paddle, which looked like a boat oar. Mr. Kelly was big like robb_k's gym teacher, so he never had to break out his paddle. Mr. O'Brian was a nice dude and he only used his paddle if somebody pushed him way over the edge. One day, the class was in an uproar over something and he tried to get our attention. The boys ignored him until he put a round metal trash can on a work table and smacked it so hard with his paddle that it flew over 20 feet away and struck the wall. "WHAP!!!"

    He had our attention for the rest of the school year. By the way, the last swat that I received in school was given by Mr. Brown after which, I pretty much figured out it was easier to sit when my butt wasn't stinging for five periods after encountering his tough love.

  4. #2604
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    All the boys at my junior high school learned immediately that Mr. Kelly (gym), Mr. Brown (vice-principle) and Mr. O'Brian (shop) were the heavy hitters. Mr. Brown had holes drilled into his paddle, which looked like a boat oar. Mr. Kelly was big like robb_k's gym teacher, so he never had to break out his paddle. Mr. O'Brian was a nice dude and he only used his paddle if somebody pushed him way over the edge. One day, the class was in an uproar over something and he tried to get our attention. The boys ignored him until he put a round metal trash can on a work table and smacked it so hard with his paddle that it flew over 20 feet away and struck the wall. "WHAP!!!"

    He had our attention for the rest of the school year. By the way, the last swat that I received in school was given by Mr. Brown after which, I pretty much figured out it was easier to sit when my butt wasn't stinging for five periods after encountering his tough love.
    For us it was Mr. Coffin. He was the Industrial Arts aka Shop Teacher. He was 6'6" blond and totally devoid of personality or humor. (Think Lurch from the Addams Family...). He made 3 different paddles. One with the 12 holes running down the length of each side. That paddle was about an inch thick. The other ones were for the girls and kids under the 5th grade. You knew you had it coming when a teacher said hold on, I am going to get Mr. Coffin now. LOL! He hit me so hard one time it felt like all the blood in my body rushed up to by face and head. LOL

  5. #2605
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    In my elementary school, if you misbehaved, you were sent to our headmaster (principal), a very strict man, who beat (whipped) his students with his pants' belt. He would go to prison if he were to do that now in Canada (or in USA, for that matter). Of course he has been deceased for quite a long time.

  6. #2606
    Our headmaster used to punish us by rubbing his face against ours so that his bristles would scratch our cheeks. At the time it seemed quite innocent, but now there seems something pervy about it.

  7. #2607
    My dad was a Joe Clark-style principal at a middle school from the mid-60s through the mid-70s; one of his most famous punishments was to make an offender walk around the flagpole for hours. When we would visit the school, kids would ask us, “Does y’all’s daddy beat y’all? He’s mean!” 🤣

  8. #2608
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    In my elementary school, if you misbehaved, you were sent to our headmaster (principal), a very strict man, who beat (whipped) his students with his pants' belt. He would go to prison if he were to do that now in Canada (or in USA, for that matter). Of course he has been deceased for quite a long time.
    Oh yeah, he wouldn't even think of doing that now. It's "time out" or send the kid home now.

  9. #2609
    Quote Originally Posted by 144man View Post
    Our headmaster used to punish us by rubbing his face against ours so that his bristles would scratch our cheeks. At the time it seemed quite innocent, but now there seems something pervy about it.
    Today that would be considered child molestation.

  10. #2610
    Quote Originally Posted by sansradio View Post
    My dad was a Joe Clark-style principal at a middle school from the mid-60s through the mid-70s; one of his most famous punishments was to make an offender walk around the flagpole for hours. When we would visit the school, kids would ask us, “Does y’all’s daddy beat y’all? He’s mean!” ��
    Walking around the flag pole would be a piece of cake. We got the paddle and then belt once we got home from school. LOL!

  11. #2611
    Man, Mom would send us out to the mulberry bush to get our own switch. She'd warn us not to make her get a good one. That was a long walk...

  12. #2612
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Man, Mom would send us out to the mulberry bush to get our own switch. She'd warn us not to make her get a good one. That was a long walk...
    Oh shit that would be in the summertime. My mom would make us get two of them (switches) so that she could braid them together and whip yo' ass! LOL! Now if she had to get at you in public, it would be the silent "pinch and twist it" routine. hehehehehehehehe!
    Last edited by marv2; 09-16-2018 at 09:34 PM.

  13. #2613
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    for us it was mr. Coffin. He was the industrial arts aka shop teacher. He was 6'6" blond and totally devoid of personality or humor. (think lurch from the addams family...). He made 3 different paddles. One with the 12 holes running down the length of each side. That paddle was about an inch thick. The other ones were for the girls and kids under the 5th grade. You knew you had it coming when a teacher said hold on, i am going to get mr. Coffin now. Lol! He hit me so hard one time it felt like all the blood in my body rushed up to by face and head. Lol
    mr coffin? Heck that shoulda been a hint right there,hehehe!!

  14. #2614
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    oh shit that would be in the summertime. My mom would make us get two of them (switches) so that she could braid them together and whip yo' ass! Lol! Now if she had to get at you in public, it would be the silent "pinch and twist it" routine. Hehehehehehehehe!
    yep,haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!

  15. #2615
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    mr coffin? Heck that shoulda been a hint right there,hehehe!!

    That was his real name, Donald Coffin. LOL! He was evil. I don't even remember what his voice sounded like now, he rarely talked ,but he was able to teach class. LOL!!!!
    Last edited by marv2; 09-18-2018 at 08:37 PM.

  16. #2616
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    yep,haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!
    uh huh. My mom would look like she was biting her lip and would be talking to you the whole time she was whipping you. LOL!

  17. #2617
    Remember when mom would get so mad that she would grab you by the wrist[vice grip]and drag you to your punishment...ouch!!!

  18. #2618
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when mom would get so mad that she would grab you by the wrist[vice grip]and drag you to your punishment...ouch!!!
    I don't think I knew your mom

  19. #2619
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when mom would get so mad that she would grab you by the wrist[vice grip]and drag you to your punishment...ouch!!!
    Oh most definitely I remember her doing that. My father would just whip you anytime, anywhere it was necessary. Luckily it wasn't in public or in front of any of your little buddies. He took my brother George to the back of the church one time and "straighten him out" LOL!

  20. #2620
    Quote Originally Posted by 144man View Post
    i don't think i knew your mom
    and you wouldn't want to if you messed up,hehehe!!

  21. #2621
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when mom would get so mad that she would grab you by the wrist[vice grip]and drag you to your punishment...ouch!!!
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    Back in my time lots of parents grabbed you by the ear! THAT hurt!

  22. #2622
    And sometimes by the throat,hehehehe!!!

  23. #2623
    When that happened, we probably deserved it.

  24. #2624
    Although our dads worked hard and we didn't bug em with silly stuff,remember those special times that we hung with[pops]? It might have been him teaching us to shine our shoes,or tie a necktie or toss the ball around those times were special for us little guys and god bless our[hardworking]dads!

  25. #2625
    Man, I remember the time my dad took me out to fly a kite. Just him and me, for the first time EVER. I was on cloud 9 until that damned kite slipped out of my hand and flew away. Cried like a little kid (I was a little kid, BTW) on the way home. I think Pops think I cried because I lost the kite but I cried because I lost the time with him.

    And one of the best moments in my life was when I was hired to work at a supermarket and told Dad that I was going to buy some clip-on ties. He wouldn't have it. He took about half an hour and showed me how to tie Windsor, half-Windsor and quick knots. He was proud of me taking a better job (I had just left McDonald's) and I was proud that he felt that way. One of my greatest blessings is to have had my old man in my life to this very day.

  26. #2626
    I remember going to fly my kite with my dad. On one occasion I couldn't be bothered to bring it down by using the winder, so I thought it would be a good idea to do it by just running my hand along the string. That was the day I discovered friction, and I got a really bad burn on my hand in the process.

  27. #2627
    Quote Originally Posted by 144man View Post
    I remember going to fly my kite with my dad. On one occasion I couldn't be bothered to bring it down by using the winder, so I thought it would be a good idea to do it by just running my hand along the string. That was the day I discovered friction, and I got a really bad burn on my hand in the process.
    We have to learn from our experiences. Ouch. Who remembers the only time in their life they answered "yes" when somebody asked them if they wanted an Indian burn? Only a true fool would do it twice.

  28. #2628
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Although our dads worked hard and we didn't bug em with silly stuff,remember those special times that we hung with[pops]? It might have been him teaching us to shine our shoes,or tie a necktie or toss the ball around those times were special for us little guys and god bless our[hardworking]dads!
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    My father always owned a store(In Winnipeg, Chicago, and L.A.). He had to work long hours 6-7 days a week. I worked together with him in all those stores. But we also had time off. He used to take me and my cousins fishing. He and my uncle, who owned the house next door to us, took out the backyard fence between, and built us an almost regulation-sized backyard ice rink. We'd lay the ice down in October, and play hockey till the end of April, or sometimes, the first week of May. All the neighbourhood kids played there. My Dad and uncle got us real metal goals. We didn't have a Zamboni, but we had a big ice-groomer(scraper) that we pushed along the ice, using two strong skaters on each side. I used to play or practise every day. My Dad and uncle coached some Peewee, at times. And they both gave us kids a lot of pointers. My Dad told me to "keep my stick on the ice" a long time before Steve Smith's(Red Green's) dad told him to do that. He always took off work to see my important school or league games. He also introduced me to Jazz, Blues and R&B music, playing his 1930s and 1940s 78s. He also introduced me to the outside World. We used to sit and look at the Globe, and I'd ask about the different countries, and what they are like. That got me iinterested in seeing The World, and led me to working for The UN in Africa and Asia for 20 years.

    He's been gone 3 years now, and I miss him a lot (he lived to 94, and was still in great shape, active, and had his full mind till he passed on. I can't even say I;ve got my full mind now, in my early '70s.
    Last edited by robb_k; 09-28-2018 at 07:29 PM.

  29. #2629
    Sounds like good times robb.

  30. #2630
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    My father always owned a store(In Winnipeg, Chicago, and L.A.). He had to work long hours 6-7 days a week. I worked together with him in all those stores. But we also had time off. He used to take me and my cousins fishing. He and my uncle, who owned the house next door to us, took out the backyard fence between, and built us an almost regulation-sized backyard ice rink. We'd lay the ice down in October, and play hockey till the end of April, or sometimes, the first week of May. All the neighbourhood kids played there. My Dad and uncle got us real metal goals. We didn't have a Zamboni, but we had a big ice-groomer(scraper) that we pushed along the ice, using two strong skaters on each side. I used to play or practise every day. My Dad and uncle coached some Peewee, at times. And they both gave us kids a lot of pointers. My Dad told me to "keep my stick on the ice" a long time before Steve Smith's(Red Green's) dad told him to do that. He always took off work to see my important school or league games. He also introduced me to Jazz, Blues and R&B music, playing his 1930s and 1940s 78s. He also introduced me to the outside World. We used to sit and look at the Globe, and I'd ask about the different countries, and what they are like. That got me iinterested in seeing The World, and led me to working for The UN in Africa and Asia for 20 years.

    He's been gone 3 years now, and I miss him a lot (he lived to 94, and was still in great shape, active, and had his full mind till he passed on. I can't even say I;ve got my full mind now, in my early '70s.
    My Pops and I share a love for music. He had a large album collection and that's probably what led to me purchasing records with every check from ages 16 through 28 (getting married changes your purchase habits). Dad introduced me to R&B and I introduced him to Reggae and African pop. He always had some good jazz but it was my buddy Don who turned me onto jazz. I think Dad and I both found blues music separate of each other.

    For no good reason, I hated jazz. The art room in high school had a receiver and two large speakers and the black kids and white kids fought over what station the radio should play. We wanted the R&B station, they wanted the rock station. Finally, it was decided that every other day it would switch. Well, Don, to the dismay of many, got the teacher to sub one of the R&B days for a jazz day.

    I'll never forget being over his house until early morning hours and him subjecting me to Bob James and Grover and Dave Sanborn and Earl Klugh and Dave Grusin and Pat Matheny and Weather Report. One Saturday on one of my record hunts, I heard a Bob James record that sounded really good playing in the background and I bought one of his records and a Grover album. I've never looked back.

    Then, I was listening to my dad's jazz and we had something else in common. We separate when it comes to country, hip hop and other forms of dance music. I fell in love with a lot of music in the '80s. And for as diverse as my listening tastes are, it's surprising that I'm such a snob that I now can't stand 90% of what is being produced today. The only music that I have that's been produced in the last ten years is gospel records.

    The beautiful thing about living in 2018 is technology. My parents traveled to North Carolina for a family reunion this summer and I gave them a '50s/'60s mp3 and a gospel mp3, each of which contained enough music to get them all the way down and back. That's a far cry from when we listened to the same three or four 8-tracks all the way down and back when we were kids. And I've put Windows Media Player playlists on their computer that they can listen to like their own personal radio station all day when they need background music. Man, I love my folks.

  31. #2631
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    My Pops and I share a love for music. He had a large album collection and that's probably what led to me purchasing records with every check from ages 16 through 28 (getting married changes your purchase habits). Dad introduced me to R&B and I introduced him to Reggae and African pop. He always had some good jazz but it was my buddy Don who turned me onto jazz. I think Dad and I both found blues music separate of each other.

    For no good reason, I hated jazz. The art room in high school had a receiver and two large speakers and the black kids and white kids fought over what station the radio should play. We wanted the R&B station, they wanted the rock station. Finally, it was decided that every other day it would switch. Well, Don, to the dismay of many, got the teacher to sub one of the R&B days for a jazz day.

    I'll never forget being over his house until early morning hours and him subjecting me to Bob James and Grover and Dave Sanborn and Earl Klugh and Dave Grusin and Pat Matheny and Weather Report. One Saturday on one of my record hunts, I heard a Bob James record that sounded really good playing in the background and I bought one of his records and a Grover album. I've never looked back.

    Then, I was listening to my dad's jazz and we had something else in common. We separate when it comes to country, hip hop and other forms of dance music. I fell in love with a lot of music in the '80s. And for as diverse as my listening tastes are, it's surprising that I'm such a snob that I now can't stand 90% of what is being produced today. The only music that I have that's been produced in the last ten years is gospel records.

    The beautiful thing about living in 2018 is technology. My parents traveled to North Carolina for a family reunion this summer and I gave them a '50s/'60s mp3 and a gospel mp3, each of which contained enough music to get them all the way down and back. That's a far cry from when we listened to the same three or four 8-tracks all the way down and back when we were kids. And I've put Windows Media Player playlists on their computer that they can listen to like their own personal radio station all day when they need background music. Man, I love my folks.
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    I agree about not liking most of the music being produced today. But there is still some good Jazz being recorded.
    Last edited by robb_k; 09-28-2018 at 07:30 PM.

  32. #2632
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    I agree about not liking most of the music being produced today. But there is still some goodJazz being recorded.
    That's true. And I should have mentioned that I'm a big fan of Scott Bradlee and Postmodern Jukebox, who take today's pop music and recompose it into retro music formats. I spent a whole month listening to their stuff on YouTube a couple of months ago and they've been on a tear since then.

    Here's a song where they redid a Maroon 5 song to sound more like a Motown tune:

  33. #2633
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    I agree about not liking most of the music being produced today. But there is still some good Jazz being recorded.
    Robb I am always open to good music, it's just that there is so, so very little of it being produced today. I am listening to Gordon Lightfoot's Greatest Hits right now LOL!

  34. #2634
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    That's true. And I should have mentioned that I'm a big fan of Scott Bradlee and Postmodern Jukebox, who take today's pop music and recompose it into retro music formats. I spent a whole month listening to their stuff on YouTube a couple of months ago and they've been on a tear since then.

    Here's a song where they redid a Maroon 5 song to sound more like a Motown tune:
    Why are groups like this one not being promoted today? The industry promotes garbage disguised a music today.

  35. #2635
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Why are groups like this one not being promoted today? The industry promotes garbage disguised a music today.
    Go to YouTube and give them a listen. The guy who leads them taught himself how to play piano and is very gifted as an arranger. Very respectful of the original pop songs as well as the genres he changes them into. For a young guy, he really appreciates classic music.

  36. #2636
    I think we covered this before but man, do I miss liner notes. It was a singular joy to listen to a new album while reading all of the production credits. Especially when they had lyrics like EW&F records used to. I know I can find out more about songs and albums on Google today, but it was special just holding them in my hands. Heck, I used to love the smell of a vinyl album that just came out of the cellophane although I did not like the wrapper sticking to my hand when I tried to throw it away.

  37. #2637
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I think we covered this before but man, do I miss liner notes. It was a singular joy to listen to a new album while reading all of the production credits. Especially when they had lyrics like EW&F records used to. I know I can find out more about songs and albums on Google today, but it was special just holding them in my hands. Heck, I used to love the smell of a vinyl album that just came out of the cellophane although I did not like the wrapper sticking to my hand when I tried to throw it away.
    I miss everything about vinyl records and collecting them.

  38. #2638
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I miss everything about vinyl records and collecting them.
    Am I the only one who's put on a vinyl record in the last few years and was shocked that the fidelity of them was so high? I had forgotten. I know people will insist that CDs are much clearer but vinyl records on a turntable sound much better to me than anything digital. I remember how the selling point of CDs was their wonderful clarity but the biggest advantage to them is being able to cue seamlessly. Except for the occasional and inevitable pop or hiss, give me vinyl.

  39. #2639
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I think we covered this before but man, do I miss liner notes. .
    I'm with you Jerry, it's a great shame that on CD's when liners or booklets are often detailed and nformative but they are most of the times hardly legible

    About fidelity and sound for me it's pure evidence. A few years ago a friend of mine who only listened to CD's and dematerialized music spent a few days in my house and before he left he said : "those records sound so warm, it's really something else !"

  40. #2640
    Quote Originally Posted by phil View Post
    I'm with you Jerry, it's a great shame that on CD's when liners or booklets are often detailed and nformative but they are most of the times hardly legible

    About fidelity and sound for me it's pure evidence. A few years ago a friend of mine who only listened to CD's and dematerialized music spent a few days in my house and before he left he said : "those records sound so warm, it's really something else !"
    I live in a condo right now. Shared walls make listening to music through speakers problematic. Hopefully, I'll be in a house in the next couple of years and I am for sure to put my turntable on the entertainment center once again.

  41. #2641
    My pops liked folks like-the mills bros. And the inkspots,which i wasn't into at all way back then,of course their work has a spot in my collection today,mom was alot more music rounded so the radio was on most of the time,as for my love of jazz it started in high school with a song called[wendy-wes montgomery]and i've been hooked ever since.

  42. #2642
    My dad is a fan of the Ink Spots and the Mills Brothers. He is a big Dominos and Coasters fan. We grew up in the '60s and '70s listening to Motown and Atlantic records. I was the designated driver for my two best friends (and cousins) in the '80s and since it was my car, it was my tape deck and half the time we'd ride around listening to mix tapes with Little Richard, James Brown, Otis Redding and a bunch of '50s and '60s acts. I like anything that I like, regardless of genre.

    I'll never forget when Mom brought home "Bohemian Rhapsody" by Queen. One song that had R&B, hard rock and opera in it. In my opinion, it's probably the greatest thing ever put to wax. But Mom probably likes everything like I do. The other 45 I remember her buying back then was "If You Leave Me Now" by Chicago, which is still one of my favorite records by a non-soul act.

    Good music is good music. And speaking of jazz, Jai, I still love everything that came out in the late '70s and '80s. Pieces of a Dream were my favorite outfit for a while but the Crusaders is probably my favorite all-time jazz band. And I believe I cried when I read that Grover died. He is the sax version of Ella Fitzgerald for me. I felt as if I lost a family member because that dude was in my heart. Still is.

  43. #2643
    You're preaching to the choir brother,i don't care if the whole world don't like my songs cause i do and that ends that.

  44. #2644
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    You're preaching to the choir brother,i don't care if the whole world don't like my songs cause i do and that ends that.
    I hear you! that's how I am.

  45. #2645
    http://www.buckybeaver.ca/ipana.php

    Does anyone remember Ipana toothpaste?

  46. #2646
    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside View Post
    http://www.buckybeaver.ca/ipana.php

    Does anyone remember Ipana toothpaste?
    Yep, worse marketing campaign in history. LOL

  47. #2647
    Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa..bucky beaver,now that's entertainment..is it me or were those commercials classic?...hey remember that one where this prince is standing before the king and queen,i mean this thing looked serious as he was asking for the hand of the princess and then they pull out this bag of-freetos chips and he has to eat just one-haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!

  48. #2648
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa..bucky beaver,now that's entertainment..is it me or were those commercials classic?...hey remember that one where this prince is standing before the king and queen,i mean this thing looked serious as he was asking for the hand of the princess and then they pull out this bag of-freetos chips and he has to eat just one-haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!
    Yes I remember. They may considered classics now, but they was also stupid LOL! Remember the guy jumping out of the plane to get away from the women coming at him n the Hiakarate commercial?

  49. #2649
    Do you remember the first cologne you wore as a teenager where you thought you
    were really cool? Mine Jade East and Canoe. By the way, I was never cool.

  50. #2650
    Remember when nobody in gym class had any right guard[except you]and they all wanted to use it?

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