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  1. #1

    Question KC & The Sunshine Band Questions

    Funky Time Grooves is in the process of re-issuing the two KC & The Sunshine Band albums recorded for and released on Epic records in the early '80's, and there is also a new KC album "Feeling You - The 1960's" that came out in March. I am a huge fan and look so forward to having these albums on CD. Hopefully "Space Cadet" and "KC Ten" will follow....

    With all this KC activity, I have a few questions about the personal KC. Does anyone know if KC is gay? What was his relationship with former KCSB member, Rick Finch? I read somewhere that it was widely known in music circles that KC and Finch were lovers during the heyday of the Sunshine Band, and that when they went their separate ways around 1980, KC sank into depression and had a hard time getting over this. Is any of that true? I just find it very interesting that so little has been said about KC's personal life. I always wondered if he was gay... and if he is, why it has been so incredibly hush-hush over the decades.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by mistercarter2u View Post
    Funky Time Grooves is in the process of re-issuing the two KC & The Sunshine Band albums recorded for and released on Epic records in the early '80's, and there is also a new KC album "Feeling You - The 1960's" that came out in March. I am a huge fan and look so forward to having these albums on CD. Hopefully "Space Cadet" and "KC Ten" will follow....
    I have been thinking about this lately. I never heard their Epic Records output. I hope to get a chance to hear albums like "The Painter".

    With all this KC activity, I have a few questions about the personal KC. Does anyone know if KC is gay?
    I highly doubt it. Of course, rumors fly. Where do they come from?

    What was his relationship with former KCSB member, Rick Finch? I read somewhere that it was widely known in music circles that KC and Finch were lovers during the heyday of the Sunshine Band, and that when they went their separate ways around 1980, KC sank into depression and had a hard time getting over this. Is any of that true?
    Again, I say it's all bullshit unless it's officially confirmed. The two worked closely together because they were the founders of the band, and record producers. Finch was the recording engineer, co-writer, and bassist as well.

    And, as Richard Finch is concerned, he's in prison for statutory rape (I forget the exact conviction). This happened a few years ago. Apparently, a lot of people in the band, and in the industry, knew about Finch's attraction to teenage boys. At one point, Finch tried to insinuate that K.C. was part of it, too. K.C. has since distanced himself, and the band, from Mr. Finch.

    I just find it very interesting that so little has been said about KC's personal life. I always wondered if he was gay... and if he is, why it has been so incredibly hush-hush over the decades.
    What does it matter if he is?
    Last edited by soulster; 05-22-2015 at 02:56 PM.

  3. #3
    What does it matter? In the grand scheme of things, nothing at all. I just wondered.

  4. #4
    As for the Epic albums, I personally loved them. They were more pop than soul; a little different from the TK releases. I expect KC intentionally changed directions a little bit as the 80's started and the disco period faded away. Had the Epic releases been promoted correctly, they could have been hits. "The Painter" was really good. I can't recall much about the other one, though I look forward to getting a copy when it comes out in June. There was one song, a ballad with Terrie DeSario, "Don't Run," that I loved.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mistercarter2u View Post
    As for the Epic albums, I personally loved them. They were more pop than soul; a little different from the TK releases. I expect KC intentionally changed directions a little bit as the 80's started and the disco period faded away.
    Of course! But, he could have taken the other path of becoming more R&B/funk. The band would have fallen a bit in mainstream popularity, but they would have been right in with Dazz Band, Cameo, and Con Funk Shun, who were still having hits. But, the band had already started the change in direction with the "Do You Wanna Go Party" album, released in 1979 on the T.K. Label. "Please Don't Go", "Betcha Didn't Know That", and his duet with Teri DeSario on Casablanca influenced that move, even though the title track was issued as the lead-off single.

    I think part of the problem at Epic may have been Larkin Arnold, who believed that Black artists should be marketed to Black radio, and White artists marketed to pop radio. he did the same thing at Capitol Records in the 70s. Columbia Artist Denise Williams says that Arnold is directly responsible for her loss of pop radio exposure and sales in the early 80s, while she was originally a pop artist at the label.

    Had the Epic releases been promoted correctly, they could have been hits. "The Painter" was really good. I can't recall much about the other one, though I look forward to getting a copy when it comes out in June. There was one song, a ballad with Terrie DeSario, "Don't Run," that I loved.
    I'm looking forward to hearing them, too.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by mistercarter2u View Post
    Funky Time Grooves is in the process of re-issuing the two KC & The Sunshine Band albums recorded for and released on Epic records in the early '80's, and there is also a new KC album "Feeling You - The 1960's" that came out in March. I am a huge fan and look so forward to having these albums on CD. Hopefully "Space Cadet" and "KC Ten" will follow....

    With all this KC activity, I have a few questions about the personal KC. Does anyone know if KC is gay? What was his relationship with former KCSB member, Rick Finch? I read somewhere that it was widely known in music circles that KC and Finch were lovers during the heyday of the Sunshine Band, and that when they went their separate ways around 1980, KC sank into depression and had a hard time getting over this. Is any of that true? I just find it very interesting that so little has been said about KC's personal life.
    I know this is an old thread, but I just recently bought the CD releases of "all in a night's work" and "the painter" and I like them very much. I was totally unfamiliar with the music on them, aside from 'give it up' which I adore. I think "space cadet: solo flight" was released recently for digital download (but some of the tracks were released on CD as bonus tracks on the 1994 Rhino release of "part 3...and more"). I don't know about the status of "ten". Hopefully that will be released for digital download at some point in the future as well. I never bought "feeling you!...the 60s", because what I've heard of it on YouTube sounds pretty awful.

    As for your question about KC's private life, the reason there is so little info about his personal life, like the names of any women he's dated, is because there aren't any. He is gay, and apparently doesn't want to make this known to his (mostly female) fans. Rick and KC lived together for many years, in a house where KC still resides. Their relationship was known to those in the music business, but wasn't talked about openly in those days, presumably because it could be a career-ender.

    There was some legal ugliness after they split, when KC took back Rick's 50% of song rights, which Rick claims he was duped into relinquishing. I personally believe that KC originally gave Rick that 50% share as a gift, and my theory is backed up by a former TK employee who was in the office the day KC came in and asked that Rick be given co-writing credits for all future songs. Rick had a HUGE role in the ground-breaking sound of those original albums, but I believe that most of the writing was done by KC.

    Then there was Rick's sex conviction, which had KC going into damage-control mode and distancing himself from Rick as much as possible, even saying that Rick was never an integral part of the band (which is ridiculous).

    In any case, there have been frequent sightings of KC at gay bars over the years, accompanied by young men. So, he's apparently not trying to hide anything in his day-to-day life, but publicly he's staying closed-mouth about his sexuality.
    Last edited by MAR; 08-15-2019 at 04:47 PM.

  7. #7
    sorry to say that the reason KC distanced himself from Finch was Finch did got to prison in Ohio for involvement with under age boys. Sad. The Sunshine Band is just a name & has been for many years

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by MAR View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but I just recently bought the CD releases of "all in a night's work" and "the painter" and I like them very much. I was totally unfamiliar with the music on them, aside from 'give it up' which I adore. I think "space cadet: solo flight" was released recently for digital download (but some of the tracks were released on CD as bonus tracks on the 1994 Rhino release of "part 3...and more"). I don't know about the status of "ten". Hopefully that will be released for digital download at some point in the future as well. I never bought "feeling you!...the 60s", because what I've heard of it on YouTube sounds pretty awful.

    As for your question about KC's private life, the reason there is so little info about his personal life, like the names of any women he's dated, is because there aren't any. He is gay, and apparently doesn't want to make this known to his (mostly female) fans. Rick and KC lived together for many years, in a house where KC still resides. Their relationship was known to those in the music business, but wasn't talked about openly in those days, presumably because it could be a career-ender.

    There was some legal ugliness after they split, when KC took back Rick's 50% of song rights, which Rick claims he was duped into relinquishing. I personally believe that KC originally gave Rick that 50% share as a gift, and my theory is backed up by a former TK employee who was in the office the day KC came in and asked that Rick be given co-writing credits for all future songs. Rick had a HUGE role in the ground-breaking sound of those original albums, but I believe that most of the writing was done by KC.

    Then there was Rick's sex conviction, which had KC going into damage-control mode and distancing himself from Rick as much as possible, even saying that Rick was never an integral part of the band (which is ridiculous).

    In any case, there have been frequent sightings of KC at gay bars over the years, accompanied by young men. So, he's apparently not trying to hide anything in his day-to-day life, but publicly he's staying closed-mouth about his sexuality.
    thanks for sharing ! The accusation that disco was "gay music" was largely true .

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    thanks for sharing ! The accusation that disco was "gay music" was largely true .
    Well, disco certainly was popular in the gay community, and many disco artists were gay, but a lot of them weren't. And straight people sure seemed to like it for a while, too!

    I actually consider KCSB's music to be more 'funk' than 'disco'. Their first album ("do it good') was strictly funk/soul/r&b (if you didn't know any better, you'd think "I'm A Pushover" was a James Brown song) and even on the later albums, the majority of the songs would fall into the funk category (nothing 'disco' at all about "I Get Lifted" from their 1975 self-titled album). Even a hit like "I'm Your Boogie Man", really couldn't accurately be described as disco.

    You have to remember that the term "disco" didn't even exist when KCSB got started. Even KC himself has said that he was confused as to why their music was suddenly slapped with the 'disco' label. Personally, when I think of disco, I think of the songs that were heavy on the strings like Donna Summer's stuff, the Bee Gees later stuff, etc.

    KC of course now fully embraces the disco label, since he's basically become an oldies act, milking disco nostalgia for all it's worth.
    Last edited by MAR; 08-16-2019 at 03:44 AM.

  10. #10
    The 'band' released a new track back in June, with the help of Nile Rodgers, "Give Me Some More (Aye Yai Yai)"

    https://youtu.be/Cstnq8Yhs0g

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by alanh View Post
    The 'band' released a new track back in June, with the help of Nile Rodgers, "Give Me Some More (Aye Yai Yai)"

    https://youtu.be/Cstnq8Yhs0g
    I can't say that I've liked anything that KC has put out in the last 25 years (since he came out of "retirement"). I give him credit as his age for continuing to plug along, but unfortunately, I think the Boogie Man has lost his mojo.

  12. #12
    I saw KC a few years ago at Universal Studios, Orlando & he was GREAT.

  13. #13
    Hi MAR ! Don't get me started on disco ! lol!

    :
    Quote Originally Posted by MAR View Post
    Well, disco certainly was popular in the gay community, and many disco artists were gay, but a lot of them weren't. And straight people sure seemed to like it for a while, too!
    yes ! and why shouldn't they ! The greatest musical genre of them all imho. Most ( a strong number) of the significant movers and shakers in the ' disco movement' were gay, many djs , mixers,producers , label owners, some artists.....


    I actually consider KCSB's music to be more 'funk' than 'disco'. Their first album ("do it good') was strictly funk/soul/r&b (if you didn't know any better, you'd think "I'm A Pushover" was a James Brown song)
    Really ? I'll have to think about that


    and even on the later albums, the majority of the songs would fall into the funk category (nothing 'disco' at all about "I Get Lifted" from their 1975 self-titled album


    OK--- let's try another song from that same LP. What do you think BOOGIE SHOES is about?....or from the first lp from 1974 ....QUEEN OF CLUBS?
    ).


    Even a hit like "I'm Your Boogie Man", really couldn't accurately be described as disco.


    Why not?


    You have to remember that the term "disco" didn't even exist when KCSB got started.
    I hear ya . Disco didn't exist when any of those earlier disco artists emerged. It was sort of spontaneous combustion, a lot of these artists sort of got inducted . Gloria Gaynor and Donna Summer never set out specifically to be disco artists . ( How could they? It didn't exist!!!) It just sort of happened to them. They were in the right place at the right time if you want to look at it that way. Same way with KC . He may not have yet called his music disco, but he was definitely creating music to dance to. And as we know, TK records became a disco hub and KC was largely involved.

    Even KC himself has said that he was confused as to why their music was suddenly slapped with the 'disco' label.
    Again , he was creating a certain sound that got well received in the discos. That's all disco is: music that got played in the discos.

    Personally, when I think of disco, I think of the songs that were heavy on the strings like Donna Summer's stuff, the Bee Gees later stuff, etc.


    Might I suggest you're limiting yourself as to what disco was or wasn't? For every song you choose to name that you consider 'disco' , I can name you another disco one that sounds nothing like it. I love strings and some of the best disco is because of the fantastic use of them, but their presence isn't manadatory. Listen to DO WHAT YOU WANNA DO by T-Connection. That song was #1 on the disco chart for SEVEN weeks, with nary a violin to be found. And speaking of charts I use the Billboard disco charts to help reinforce what was disco . If its on those charts : it's undeniably disco. GET DOWN TONIGHT ---#11....PART III , entire album --- #9 . I find 'disco' music hard to pigeon hole. It was constantly evolving . The DJs demanded that, always wanting something new. It was certain eventual death to sound the same over and over ( The Trammps).


    ]KC of course now fully embraces the disco label, since he's basically become an oldies act, milking disco nostalgia for all it's worth


    Yes when it works in his favor suddenly , of course I'm disco. Back in the day he likely considered it a liability which would also explain his intentionally distancing his music from the disco label back then. Whatever helps the career,
    sort of the same with owning up to being gay ....or not.

    ....
    .

    I love KC btw ! Here's T-Connection (label mates of KC too) :



    Cheers!!
    Last edited by Boogiedown; 08-16-2019 at 02:27 PM.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by motony View Post
    I saw KC a few years ago at Universal Studios, Orlando & he was GREAT.
    I have heard that the live shows are still great, but the recorded material he's put out recently hasn't been so hot.
    Last edited by MAR; 08-16-2019 at 05:59 PM.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    OK--- let's try another song from that same LP. What do you think BOOGIE SHOES is about?....or from the first lp from 1974 ....QUEEN OF CLUBS? ).


    Might I suggest you're limiting yourself as to what disco was or wasn't? For every song you choose to name that you consider 'disco' , I can name you another disco one that sounds nothing like it. I love strings and some of the best disco is because of the fantastic use of them, but their presence isn't manadatory. Listen to DO WHAT YOU WANNA DO by T-Connection. That song was #1 on the disco chart for SEVEN weeks, with nary a violin to be found. And speaking of charts I use the Billboard disco charts to help reinforce what was disco . If its on those charts : it's undeniably disco. GET DOWN TONIGHT ---#11....PART III , entire album --- #9 . I find 'disco' music hard to pigeon hole. It was constantly evolving . The DJs demanded that, always wanting something new. It was certain eventual death to sound the same over and over ( The Trammps).


    I love KC btw ! Here's T-Connection (label mates of KC too) :


    Cheers!!
    I love KC, too. He's actually one of my favorite soul singers & composers (along with Prince), and I think he's very underrated in that regard- "Why Don't We Get Together" is one of my favorite examples of this.

    That T-Connection track definitely sounds more like funk than disco to me.

    But, I am limiting myself to the American definition of disco, which I think is very different than the definition in other parts of the world, where I believe disco is synonymous with dance/club music. Under that definition then yes, "queen of clubs" would be considered disco, but the way most Americans think of disco is quite narrow (like a dance sub-category marked by a light, airy feel, lots of swirling strings and soaring vocals), and it doesn't encompass everything from that era that is dance-able.

    For example, many Queen fans outside the US consider "hot space" to be a disco album, which I definitely do not. I think the definition of disco is just more broad in the UK, Europe, South America, etc.
    Last edited by MAR; 08-17-2019 at 06:11 AM.

  16. #16
    Hi MAR !

    Quote Originally Posted by MAR View Post
    I love KC, too. He's actually one of my favorite soul singers & composers (along with Prince), and I think he's very underrated in that regard- "Why Don't We Get Together" is one of my favorite examples of this.
    I gave this a listen , and I agree , it's a very nice song . Very nice. KC does have a quality to his voice I have always found to be very appealing. I remember I was working the tail end of a night shift at a record store in Honolulu when we put on his new ANYBODY WANNA PARTY LP (we might've been rollerskating to it, it was a big store!) and PLEASE DON"T GO immediately jumped out at me. I was not surprised it could be a hit , and pleased that the record company recognized the caliber of the song and risked releasing it despite the departure from his expected sound. (It went to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100)


    And I gave PUSHOVER a listen, and I DO hear James Brown in IM A PUSHOVER!. JB in spirit, but a tad more lively, with a stronger , more full vocal, with stronger arranged back up vocals, and that incessant cowbell( did James ever do cowbell?) But yes those horns and that funky bass line. Of course no music is created in a vacuum and I'd be disappointed to learn KC and the horn Band weren't JB fans. BTW did you know james brown claimed himself the original disco man!


    That T-Connection track definitely sounds more like funk than disco to me.
    Yes it's at the very funky end of the spectrum of disco music which covered a lot of sounds. But its 100 % disco in this case as it was intended to be and released as such.



    As you can see, it was pressed and sold on a disco 12" on the TK DISCO label and you'll notice its designation as the longer "DISCO VERSION".
    And as mentioned , it was #1 on the disco chart for six weeks , that's an amazing run at the top , so to label it anything else is a denial of reality.

    But, I am limiting myself to the American definition of disco,
    ? I really have no idea what this means ...what 'Americans?' Was there some poll taken? Americans of the actual era , or Americans of today? Americans of NYC or Nashville Tennessee or Anchorage Alaska? Old or young , male or female , straight , gay, black, white.... etc.? ...Who?

    which I think is very different than the definition in other parts of the world, where I believe disco is synonymous with dance/club music.
    Well that's certainly logical of them wouldn't you say?. The dynamics of the disco movement ( in the US, it was a movement) in the US was dramatically different than what went on in the rest of the world. The sudden US gay liberation of the 70s was discos catalyst, it created the engine , the energy ....etc. etc. etc. .........

    Under that definition then yes, "queen of clubs" would be considered disco, but the way most Americans think of disco is quite narrow (like a dance sub-category marked by a light, airy feel, lots of swirling strings and soaring vocals), and it doesn't encompass everything from that era that is dance-able.
    I have no idea how to speak on behalf of most Americans, nor to claim I know what they think about anything much less disco. The topic of 'disco' with 'most Americans' likely takes place at the shallow end of the pool ...it always has.

    For example, many Queen fans outside the US consider "hot space" to be a disco album, which I definitely do not. I think the definition of disco is just more broad in the UK, Europe, South America, etc.
    Speaking for myself, BODY LANGUAGE fits the broader umbrella of disco , especially within what was comprising disco at the tail end of its era,... very bad disco imo , which is why it could only muster a #62 peak on the disco chart.

    I mentioned that disco kept changing in sound over its seven years or so run , that the DJs and the club devotees weren't looking for the same sound over and over during that time . This was also true in the course of a single night at the club , the sounds changed , speeding up - slowing down , more funky, more electro. I really have no memory of anyone worrying if a song was "disco" or not...if it fit in , if the crowd responded , that's what mattered.

    I get that nowadays , after the fact , there is a desire to specify disco as being this certain sound , to be able to label it clearly as such. Some of it is easier to do in that way than others. That's why I strongly urge referencing the disco charts . Every disco song isn't there , but the significant ones, in real time, are. Thats your American disco , documented in B&W.
    I lived it, I know its reality, to want to re-write it is to me fake news.
    ........................

    Added: There are however, specific songs and acts that fall under more than one category of musical styles and this is true with disco / jazz , rock , pop, and funk especially.
    Some artists / releases were aimed at discos specifically , they are the easier ones to label . At other times an artist might stick a singular song or two on their LP that falls under the disco label while the rest doesn't. Many Motown acts did this. Working in a record store, this became challenging. I recall Alicia Bridges debut LP. On it was one disco song , I LOVE THE NIGHTLIFE , the rest was rock , pop. But that was the hit, this one disco song on the LP . Then the debate was, where to file her LP in the record store? ....and for me....do I have an obligation to warn the buyer the rest of the album does not sound like this?
    Last edited by Boogiedown; 08-18-2019 at 09:34 PM.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    I gave this a listen , and I agree , it's a very nice song . Very nice.
    Glad you like it! That song is a very early one- it's the b-side of their 2nd single "sound your funky horn". KC must have only been about 22 when he did it. Another interesting one is "I'm Gonna Do Something Good To You" which was the b-side of their 1st single "blow your whistle" and was actually credited to "KC and the Sunshine Junkanoo Band" (they dropped the 'junkanoo' right after).


    The song was written by TK artist Clarence Reid (aka "blowfly") and he recorded his own version which has the exact same backing track as KC's version.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    And I gave PUSHOVER a listen, and I DO hear James Brown in IM A PUSHOVER!. JB in spirit, but a tad more lively, with a stronger , more full vocal, with stronger arranged back up vocals, and that incessant cowbell( did James ever do cowbell?) But yes those horns and that funky bass line. Of course no music is created in a vacuum and I'd be disappointed to learn KC and the horn Band weren't JB fans.
    KC grew up listening to Motown and everything R&B so I'm sure he was influenced by JB. As a matter of fact, I'm sure I've read/heard at least one interview where he's mentioned JB as an influence.


    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    I have no idea how to speak on behalf of most Americans, nor to claim I know what they think about anything much less disco. The topic of 'disco' with 'most Americans' likely takes place at the shallow end of the pool ...it always has.
    It's all just semantics, really, but the term "disco" became such a pejorative in the late 70s/early 80s in the US, and then the "disco sucks" backlash and the notorious Comiskey Park "Disco Demolition Night"...maybe the narrower the definition of disco, the better? Maybe it's preferable to be called "funk" if the term applies, I don't know.

    I guess I just don't have a lot of faith in the musical tastes of my fellow Americans. I think we don't value many of our artists as much as we should; so many of our own have been more successful overseas than on their home turf. I often feel that (generally, of course) other countries have a much more open-minded and eclectic appreciation for music, and so many Americans will just listen to any ol'crap and will so easily discount anything that isn't immediately perceived as cool enough/macho enough/serious enough/rock 'n roll enough, etc.

    PS - it must have been fun at times working in a record store in the 1970s! I imagine you must have had the opportunity to collect some pretty cool promo items!
    Last edited by MAR; 08-20-2019 at 03:47 AM.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by MAR View Post
    Glad you like it! That song is a very early one- it's the b-side of their 2nd single "sound your funky horn". KC must have only been about 22 when he did it. Another interesting one is "I'm Gonna Do Something Good To You" which was the b-side of their 1st single "blow your whistle" and was actually credited to "KC and the Sunshine Junkanoo Band" (they dropped the 'junkanoo' right after).


    The song was written by TK artist Clarence Reid (aka "blowfly") and he recorded his own version which has the exact same backing track as KC's version.

    KC grew up listening to Motown and everything R&B so I'm sure he was influenced by JB. As a matter of fact, I'm sure I've read/heard at least one interview where he's mentioned JB as an influence.




    It's all just semantics, really, but the term "disco" became such a pejorative in the late 70s/early 80s in the US, and then the "disco sucks" backlash and the notorious Comiskey Park "Disco Demolition Night"...maybe the narrower the definition of disco, the better? Maybe it's preferable to be called "funk" if the term applies, I don't know.

    I guess I just don't have a lot of faith in the musical tastes of my fellow Americans. I think we don't value many of our artists as much as we should; so many of our own have been more successful overseas than on their home turf. I often feel that (generally, of course) other countries have a much more open-minded and eclectic appreciation for music, and so many Americans will just listen to any ol'crap and will so easily discount anything that isn't immediately perceived as cool enough/macho enough/serious enough/rock 'n roll enough, etc.

    PS - it must have been fun at times working in a record store in the 1970s! I imagine you must have had the opportunity to collect some pretty cool promo items!
    Good post MAR!

    I agree with what you've said. Who knows why certain music resonates with some and not others. A lot of it is context . As for disco , it was unfolding right before our eyes , tailoring itself for the club experience . To not have heard disco in that intended setting , well I'm not sure how anyone looking in from the outside or posthumously would ever fully get it. I can't help but wonder what experiencing big band music was like with the band live in the room while people dressed to the nines danced and ate and partied , men in uniform , war looming. Places it into its own special experience.

    Disco died around 1980-81 for reasons beyond the backlash. I don't think it could have sustained itself, it was like a flash fire that burned itself out.

    As for Europe , and the rest of the world, the exotic always has an appeal , music and personalities from far away. Americans were spoiled , we had so much music of our own making , so many genres, too much to fully consume. Yet even so, the British invasion captivated us.

    Yes I really enjoyed working in record stores. One thing about promo material ...it sold well !
    The posters and flats ( album covers on cardboard) intended for making displays only, we offered from behind the counter( shhh!) We had quite a slush fund!!

    --------

    Oh I meant to mention , James Brown eventually released a disco single on KC's home turf label out of Miami in the early eighties. I wish it were more noteworthy , was it called something about potatoes perhaps???
    Last edited by Boogiedown; 08-20-2019 at 01:12 PM.

  19. #19
    Just to pop in here... I love KC & The Sunshine Band and agree that their debut was more at times more funky/R&B than disco... and that James Brown single you're thinking of Boogie is "Mashed Potatoes"... from his 1980 TK album Soul Syndrome!

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogiedown View Post
    Yes I really enjoyed working in record stores. One thing about promo material ...it sold well !
    The posters and flats ( album covers on cardboard) intended for making displays only, we offered from behind the counter( shhh!) We had quite a slush fund!!
    I remember they used to sell album flats at a Tower Records near where I lived (in the mid-1990s), but they did it right out in the open. They had a box sitting on the counter, and I think they sold them for 50 cents or maybe $1 a piece. I got some nice ones there-- Queen, Lena Horne, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by TomatoTom123 View Post
    Just to pop in here... I love KC & The Sunshine Band and agree that their debut was more at times more funky/R&B than disco... and that James Brown single you're thinking of Boogie is "Mashed Potatoes"... from his 1980 TK album Soul Syndrome!
    There's an interesting website, all about Henry Stone, the president of TK records. Lots of great photos, etc. You'll notice on the main page, a photo of Henry Stone and a dark-haired young man standing behind him...a very young Harry Casey: http://www.henrystonemusic.com/
    Last edited by MAR; 08-22-2019 at 01:33 AM.

  21. #21
    There's a great book "Florida Soul" with an complete chapter on K.C. An essential reading !

    https://www.amazon.com/Florida-Soul-...der_0813054524


  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by phil View Post
    There's a great book "Florida Soul" with an complete chapter on K.C. An essential reading !
    That is a great book-- I was able to read quite a few pages on Amazon. In the chapter on KC, he talks about how he basically wrote all of the songs by himself and confirms that he and Rick Finch had a 50/50 songwriting-credit agreement "no matter who did what". However, I didn't know that KC had a somewhat acrimonious split from TK records, when he went to Epic...interesting.

    The book also has a chapter on Wayne Cochran ("The White Knight of Soul"), who had some nice things to say about KC's music. My mom dated Wayne briefly in 1969 - he even asked her to marry him! Fortunately for me, she declined and married my dad instead.
    Last edited by MAR; 08-23-2019 at 05:27 AM.

  23. #23
    I just looked up Wayne Cochran and wow..... that hair..... no wonder your mum said no!

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by TomatoTom123 View Post
    I just looked up Wayne Cochran and wow..... that hair..... no wonder your mum said no!
    Ha ha! Yeah, his hair should have had its own zip code! He wasn't her usual "type", she had just gotten out of a long relationship and went a little crazy for a while. Pearl Jam actually covered one of Wayne's songs, called "the last kiss". Here's a clip of Wayne on the Jackie Gleason show (BTW, Gleason's show was shot in Miami and one of the horn players in the house band was Mike Lewis, who was a studio musician/arranger for KC and other TK artists):https://strangerintown.podcastpeople.com/posts/53365

    Last edited by MAR; 08-25-2019 at 02:53 AM.

  25. #25
    This is a really fascinating (and long) article on KC. It's pretty old, but still worth a read:
    https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/h...-past-11256284

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by mistercarter2u View Post
    Hopefully "Space Cadet" and "KC Ten" will follow....
    FYI, it looks like KC's "TEN" CD might still be available on his site:
    https://store.heykcsb.com/cds
    Last edited by MAR; 09-07-2019 at 03:57 PM.

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