[REMOVE ADS]




Today 01:25 PM

Kent soul in the 1960s

Hi!

Do you remember Kent/Modern Records from the 1960s. I really liked their output. Now there's a new compilation of their product, but not the best, I'm afraid:

https://www.soulexpress.net/va_lasoul_vol2.htm

Best regards
Heikki
Today 09:51 AM
Today 01:32 PM

Martha Reeves Celebrity Masterchef UK

Isnít Martha the most extraordinary person?


It has just been announced that Martha is to be a contestant in the very popular and widely watched UK series Celebrity Masterchef, which features Celebrities competing to be the winning chef. At 77 years of age Martha wins a very high profile and potentially highly lucrative opportunity to show off her cooking skills in the kitchen. Celebrity Masterchef is a very good platform for Martha as it avoids the crap content and maintains a degree of respect and dignity for all the contestants.
Today 09:01 AM

Cameo from large band to 3 members. Why?

Does anyone know why Cameo went from being a large band to a 3 man entity (I did notice other musicians who were not featured in promo photos). I was hoping that Unsung would feature them but it never happened. I always wondered why Wayne Cooper left and why the others followed.
Today 11:49 AM

Motown Revue MUSIC STANDS

Trivia question. In the book by Curtis E. Woodson, Memories of the 1962 Motown Revue published in 2005, on page 11 there is a picture of two
Motown employees loading the music stands on the bus which was ready to depart for the long tour. There are 8 music stands enscribed as follows:

Motor
Town Special

Choker
Campbell

Orchestra


Question: Has any members ever seen any of these? I don't believe they lasted beyond the 1962 tour as the tours became the Motown Revue by the time the tour ended in the Apollo Theatre in December of 1962. I do not know exactly at what point the name changed. Conversely, does anyone know of any of these music stands surviving today? I never saw one at the Motown Museum.
Today 05:38 AM

Phil Spector - Part F - "Apple Records"

In 1969, when Phil Spector was launching his A&M productions, The Beatles began sessions for an album they hoped would restore a more straightforward approach to their music. Their recent singles, "Get Back" and "Lady Madonna", had already turned them in that direction.

By 1970, however, The Beatles were in disarray. Paul had outgrown the group and was working on his first solo album; John had just released "Cold Turkey", following "Give Peace A Chance" which set the wole world singing; Ringo had made the "Sentimental Journey" album which could only have only been intended as a present for his parents; and George, although "Something" had been a huge success, still seemed restricted to Beatles' B-sides and two cuts per album.

Given the working title "Get Back", sessions for the new album proved difficult as the individual Beatles continued to move toward separate careers. The sessions dissolved into dissension, with John and Paul at each other's throat, and the unfinished tapes were deemed unworthy of release.

Phil Spector, whose relationship with The Beatles had been maintained through intermittent exchanges of congratulation over the years, had been recommended by The Beatles manager, Allen Klein, who was also a friend of Phil Spector, to undertake the task of preparing the "Get Back" tapes for release. The resulting album, "Let It Be", proved to be The Beatles' final package of new material, meeting with a barrage of criticism from the rock press and Beatles fans alike, accusing Spector of ruining The Beatles sound. The track, "The Long And Winding Road", received the most outrageous criticism of Spector's work. Deemed as "mushy and over-produced" by some critics, the record boasts a bigness that seems fitting for the group's farewell release. The original demo, which used a piano to create a scaling effect, was greatly improved upon by the addition of an orchestra and string passages. Spector combined these with a chorus that could easily stand in for a heavenly host.

Despite less-than-enthusiastic reviews for Phil's production, the album sold several million copies. Harrison and Lennon were sufficiently impressed to request Phil's services for their first solo efforts. Their results were impressive as well. In hindsight, those who have since heard the pre-Spector versions of the material appearing on various bootlegs over the years, know that he salvaged an otherwise unmarketable product and should be commended for it.

[NOTE: The above intro from Jack Fitzpatrick's "Collecting Phil Spector" and Richard Williams' "Out Of His Head: The Sound Of Phil Spector".]

[REMOVE ADS]

Ralph Terrana
MODERATOR

Welcome to Soulful Detroit! Kindly Consider Turning Off Your Ad BlockingX
Soulful Detroit is a free service that relies on revenue from ad display [regrettably] and donations. We notice that you are using an ad-blocking program that prevents us from earning revenue during your visit.
Ads are REMOVED for Members who donate to Soulful Detroit. [You must be logged in for ads to disappear]
DONATE HERE »
And have Ads removed.