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Today 09:40 AM
Yesterday 09:22 PM

Why So Many Temptations???

I was thinking today ( I know, scary huh? LOL!) why were there so many Temptations, replacement members or what have you? I think there were something like 300 Temptations and counting. Well, maybe not quite that many, but there were a lot of them.

Why do think there were so many individual Temptation members?
Today 09:20 AM

Say hello to Russell Thompkins Jr of the New Stylistics

SDF Family,

Let's keep this thread going. Since Ralph invited me to the Forum a few years ago, I have received invaluable feedback from all of you regarding several different topics. Your questions, comments, and excellent musical knowledge motivates me and TNS to perform at the highest level we can and it has also helped us to become better, more informed human beings. We look forward to the continued dialouge.

We love you!

RAT Jr & The New Stylistics
Today 07:14 AM

Music documentaries on amazon prime

I was recently searching movies on Amazon Prime and ran into a few interesting titles.

Tear The Roof Off: The Untold Story of Parliament Funkadelic
Gospel According To Al Green
Gil Scott Heron: Black Wax
Whitney Houston: We Will Always Love You
Sammy Davis Jr: I Gotta Be Me
Lady You Shot Me: The Life & Death of Sam Cooke
Michael Jackson: Chase The Truth
Free Meek (rapper Meek Mill)
Paradise Boogie (bluesmen from Detroit's Black Bottom era)

I will be watching them all.
Yesterday 07:35 PM

Len Barry talks about "1-2-3" / "Ask Any Girl"

Len Barry (credited by his real name: Leonard Borisoff) wrote this with the Philadelphia songwriting/production team of John Madara and David White, who also wrote the hits "You Don't Own Me" and "At The Hop."

In an interview with Forgotten Hits, Madara explained: "In 1965, with '1-2-3' being the #1 record in the country, we were sued by Motown during the period when Berry Gordy was suing anyone whose records sounded like a Motown record. We were sued, saying that '1-2-3' was taken from a B-Side of a Supremes record called 'Ask Any Girl.' The only similarity between the two songs are the first three notes where the Supremes sang 'Ask Any Girl' and Lenny sang '1-2-3.' After that, there were no similarities, but their lawsuit said that our goal was to copy the Motown sound. Well, needless to say, Motown kept us in court, tying up all of our writers' royalties, production royalties and publishing royalties, and threatened to sue us on the follow-up to '1-2-3,' which was 'Like A Baby.' So after battling with them for two years and having a ton of legal bills, we made a settlement with Motown, giving them 15% of the writers' and publishers' share.
We never heard 'Ask Any Girl.' The only influence for making '1-2-3' was to make a ballad with a beat. And the sound of '1-2-3' was definitely the sound of the era. Listen to 'The In-Crowd' - that's not the Motown Sound, that's the sound of the era - and '1-2-3' definitely had a beat! Motown was suing a lot of people at the time."

http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=4937

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Ralph Terrana
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