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Thread: Remember when?

  1. #1451
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Jerry I had a Jheri curl from roughly 1981 to mid 1983. I went to Atlanta in 1993 around my birthday and there were guys walking around with Jheri curls some 10 years after we stopped. LOL!!!!
    I'm willing to bet those guys were not from the ATL but from Valdosta or Macon. lol

    I lived in the ATL around that time and none of the guys I knew (from the city proper) were doing Jheri curls. The thing that really struck me was Atl was one of the most progressive places I had been to at the time. However the joke (although not really a joke) Atlanta and Georgia were two different places entirely.Step outside of the ATL and you were in a different world.

  2. #1452
    Quote Originally Posted by ms_m View Post
    I'm willing to bet those guys were not from the ATL but from Valdosta or Macon. lol

    I lived in the ATL around that time and none of the guys I knew (from the city proper) were doing Jheri curls. The thing that really struck me was Atl was one of the most progressive places I had been to at the time. However the joke (although not really a joke) Atlanta and Georgia were two different places entirely.Step outside of the ATL and you were in a different world.
    So, it was those country guys who were wearing Jheri curls? Sounds right. LOL.

  3. #1453
    Quote Originally Posted by ms_m View Post
    That may be true but I bet they use words and phrases people in other areas don't. Example, I always say soda but a friend from Cleveland uses the word pop. Or what about the word Houston...in New York they pronounce the street of the same name as Houseton...
    So, that went right over your head, didn't it? LOL.

  4. #1454
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    I think Jerry was joking when he said his "Area" is the only one without a regional accent. There's NO region in USA that doesn't have an accent different from all others. Standard TV American (taught in announcer schools) seems to be about half way between that of Northern California and Upstate New York. So, not even one of those 2 closest dialects are right on the mark, Upstate New York having a slight "twang" (especially in Buffalo/Rochester), and northern California having vowels slightly "flatter" than Standard TV American.
    I kid. I kid. By the very definition, every area has a regional dialect. Even if there was a lack of one, it would be different from every other area and consequently, the lack of commonality in speech is in itself a dialect.
    Last edited by Jerry Oz; 02-06-2017 at 12:33 AM.

  5. #1455
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    So, that went right over your head, didn't it? LOL.
    I never noticed anything distinctive about the way people talk in Ohio. Just the words and phrases they used. So yeah, I guess it did.

  6. #1456
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    So, it was those country guys who were wearing Jheri curls? Sounds right. LOL.
    Yep!!!!!!!!

  7. #1457
    Quote Originally Posted by ms_m View Post
    I never noticed anything distinctive about the way people talk in Ohio. Just the words and phrases they used. So yeah, I guess it did.
    I hear it. If you ask the name of the capital, if we speak slowly, everybody will say "Columbus Ohio". But in conversation, it is "Kuh-lumbas Ah-hio", like we take shortcuts on pronunciation. I'm sure there are more examples.

  8. #1458
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I hear it. If you ask the name of the capital, if we speak slowly, everybody will say "Columbus Ohio". But in conversation, it is "Kuh-lumbas Ah-hio", like we take shortcuts on pronunciation. I'm sure there are more examples.
    In Boston they pronounce Ohio as "Oh hiya".

  9. #1459
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    In Boston they pronounce Ohio as "Oh hiya".
    A long time ago, I heard a story about a Midwestern woman who moved to Boston with her husband. She was invited to a dinner party to meet her neighbors where one of the women told her she loved her p-s-d-s. She thanked her, but had no idea what she was talking about. I guess it got mentioned a couple of more times so she finally asked someone what p-s-d-s was and the woman touched her earrings. The dialect was so strong that she couldn't tell that p-s-d-s was how they pronounced "pierced ears".

    Everybody has inflections on syllables and words and regional speech rules and words. I watch English and Scottish movies with subtitles because I sometimes can barely understand what's being said.

    (Speaking of which, watch "Peaky Blinders" if you have NetFlix. With the subtitles streaming.)

  10. #1460
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    A long time ago, I heard a story about a Midwestern woman who moved to Boston with her husband. She was invited to a dinner party to meet her neighbors where one of the women told her she loved her p-s-d-s. She thanked her, but had no idea what she was talking about. I guess it got mentioned a couple of more times so she finally asked someone what p-s-d-s was and the woman touched her earrings. The dialect was so strong that she couldn't tell that p-s-d-s was how they pronounced "pierced ears".

    Everybody has inflections on syllables and words and regional speech rules and words. I watch English and Scottish movies with subtitles because I sometimes can barely understand what's being said.

    (Speaking of which, watch "Peaky Blinders" if you have NetFlix. With the subtitles streaming.)

    I lived in Boston and the accent is THICK! If you have to pay multiple parking tickets, you have to go to the " Poleese Dee Pot Ment"! LOL! They drop the "R" in most words. Go over the State line into Rhode Island and it is entirely different.

    If you're buying a coffee be prepared to be asked if you'd like a "coffee regular". LOL!
    Last edited by marv2; 02-06-2017 at 03:34 PM.

  11. #1461
    Marv, this commercial never fails to crack me up:

  12. #1462
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Marv, this commercial never fails to crack me up:
    Yep! That is exactly how it is sitting around with people I know in Boston! LOL! Here's another example:

    "Mah-vin, you seem stressed out. Why don't you git in yo cah, drive up the skreet to the bah and have a bi-er"! LOL!!!
    Last edited by marv2; 02-06-2017 at 05:47 PM.

  13. #1463
    One other thing. Do NOT make fun of their accent up there. They get made as Hell over it! LOL!

  14. #1464
    I saw "Black Mass". I ain't laughing at any Irishman from Boston like I'm not laughing at any Italian from Brooklyn.

    Except Rudy Giuliani.

  15. #1465
    Quote Originally Posted by ms_m View Post
    I never noticed anything distinctive about the way people talk in Ohio. Just the words and phrases they used. So yeah, I guess it did.
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    Ohio has a twang that's midway between the Chicago twang and Western Pennsylvania twang. But, they sound a little more Midwestern. Upstate New York is the hardest to peg, as it is so close to "TV American".

  16. #1466
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I saw "Black Mass". I ain't laughing at any Irishman from Boston like I'm not laughing at any Italian from Brooklyn.

    Except Rudy Giuliani.
    Living in New York as long as I have, I sound like a Brooklyn Italian guy. After a few drinks, I'm Jamaican all of a sudden! LOL!!!

  17. #1467
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Ohio has a twang that's midway between the Chicago twang and Western Pennsylvania twang. But, they sound a little more Midwestern. Upstate New York is the hardest to peg, as it is so close to "TV American".
    People from Southern Ohio sound different from those in Northern Ohio even.

  18. #1468
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    People from Southern Ohio sound different from those in Northern Ohio even.
    I live in Franklin County. People from Licking County (to our immediate east) have a much different manner of speaking. Of course, Columbus and its suburbs are in Franklin County and there is a lot more transplant influence in cities than in rural areas like Licking County.

  19. #1469
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I live in Franklin County. People from Licking County (to our immediate east) have a much different manner of speaking. Of course, Columbus and its suburbs are in Franklin County and there is a lot more transplant influence in cities than in rural areas like Licking County.
    Exactly. My youngest brother lives in Columbus now.

  20. #1470
    Quote Originally Posted by ms_m View Post
    I'm willing to bet those guys were not from the ATL but from Valdosta or Macon. lol

    I lived in the ATL around that time and none of the guys I knew (from the city proper) were doing Jheri curls. The thing that really struck me was Atl was one of the most progressive places I had been to at the time. However the joke (although not really a joke) Atlanta and Georgia were two different places entirely.Step outside of the ATL and you were in a different world.
    I don't now. But I clearly remember my cousin and I pulling into a gas station in Atlanta and several guys were there with these long Jheri curls. We also went to "Magic City" and to my friends nightclub called "Mr. V's".

  21. #1471
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I don't now. But I clearly remember my cousin and I pulling into a gas station in Atlanta and several guys were there with these long Jheri curls. We also went to "Magic City" and to my friends nightclub called "Mr. V's".
    Very familiar with Mr. V's. (Greenbriar Mall) A friend was the General Mgr. If you saw jheri curls there then trust...THEY WERE NOT from the city. LOL

  22. #1472
    Quote Originally Posted by ms_m View Post
    Very familiar with Mr. V's. (Greenbriar Mall) A friend was the General Mgr. If you saw jheri curls there then trust...THEY WERE NOT from the city. LOL
    My friend that worked there and later owned his own clubs was Ronald Bryant. We grew up together. He passed away several years ago.

  23. #1473
    Hey remember those[playpen]living room sofas?those things had about twenty pieces and filled your whole room?

  24. #1474
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Hey remember those[playpen]living room sofas?those things had about twenty pieces and filled your whole room?
    I don't know if I remember those. Did they have a sectional sofa as a part of them?

  25. #1475
    Yep,they were huge.

  26. #1476
    Remember when everything came in glass jars and no plastic,even vaseline.

  27. #1477
    I remember needing a can opener to a can of pop. You had to put two holes in the lid to let it pour right.

  28. #1478
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when everything came in glass jars and no plastic,even vaseline.
    I remember when milk came in glass containers. I use to break one about every week trying to reach up to put it on the counter as a kid. LOL! Oh and all soda came in glass bottles back in the day.

  29. #1479
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember needing a can opener to a can of pop. You had to put two holes in the lid to let it pour right.
    I remember that Jerry and with juice cans.

  30. #1480
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I remember when milk came in glass containers. I use to break one about every week trying to reach up to put it on the counter as a kid. LOL! Oh and all soda came in glass bottles back in the day.
    Do you remember dropping your lunch box on the school yard or coat room and knowing before checking that your thermos' inner bottle was broke? Those things were super thin. It seemed like the only time that I dropped them was when Mom put something good like orange Hi-C in them.

    I used to have a Ringling Brothers lunch box like this one:

  31. #1481
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Do you remember dropping your lunch box on the school yard or coat room and knowing before checking that your thermos' inner bottle was broke? Those things were super thin. It seemed like the only time that I dropped them was when Mom put something good like orange Hi-C in them.

    I used to have a Ringling Brothers lunch box like this one:
    Yeah I knew it because you could hear it. The rattling of broken glass. LOL! I posted a pic of my 4th Grade lunch box on here a while back. I had a red thermos with a black cap/top.

  32. #1482
    Ok, let me set up a scene. It is somewhere in the sixties, somewhere in America (or maybe Canada too) and you're a kid on the street playing with your friends, What game are you guys playing when you hear one kid recite this:

    "Last night, night before. Twenty-four robbers at my door....."

  33. #1483
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember needing a can opener to a can of pop. You had to put two holes in the lid to let it pour right.
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    Yes! And I even thought of the "pop-top can" in the early '50s. Too bad I didn't draw up the plans and patent it! I'd be a billionaire today.

  34. #1484
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    Yeah I knew it because you could hear it. The rattling of broken glass. LOL! I posted a pic of my 4th Grade lunch box on here a while back. I had a red thermos with a black cap/top.
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    I was a brown bagger, but I did have a Hopalong Cassidy lunch box (we called 'em lunch pails). My little brother was young enough to have a Davy Crockett lunch box. He had the coonskin cap and rifle, too. I had the Red Ryder BB gun. It didn't help at all when a bull moose came into our backyard from the creek.

  35. #1485
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when everything came in glass jars and no plastic,even vaseline.
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    Everything was glass and wood. We didn't even know what plastic was when I was a little kid. We still had an ice box in our house, and an old ring washer, and no garbage disposal. I knew people who grew up in Canada without indoor plumbing and using a pot-bellied stove to heat the house. Imagine going outside to the toilet in 50 degrees below zero (actual temperature - 100 below wind chill) in the middle of the night. You squatted (Middle and Far Eastern style) rather than sit down on that frozen toilet seat!
    Last edited by robb_k; 02-28-2017 at 01:36 AM.

  36. #1486
    Okay, who remembers one of these?

    Or this?

  37. #1487
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    Yes! And I even thought of the "pop-top can" in the early '50s. Too bad I didn't draw up the plans and patent it! I'd be a billionaire today.
    and I'd be your best friend! hehehehehehe!

  38. #1488
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
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    I was a brown bagger, but I did have a Hopalong Cassidy lunch box (we called 'em lunch pails). My little brother was young enough to have a Davy Crockett lunch box. He had the coonskin cap and rifle, too. I had the Red Ryder BB gun. It didn't help at all when a bull moose came into our backyard from the creek.
    Robb, we called them lunch pails too or rather my parents did. My brother Danny had 2 BB guns, but we never had mooses in our backyard just a Buckeye tree and a cherry tree. LOL!

  39. #1489
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Okay, who remembers one of these?

    Or this?
    I remember. My Grandma had both.

  40. #1490
    Ok now, who remembers these:

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  41. #1491
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I remember. My Grandma had both.
    Mine too. I can still smell the sheets that she took off her clothes line.

  42. #1492
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Mine too. I can still smell the sheets that she took off her clothes line.
    I remember running down the rows between them. Simple things made us happy as kids. Maybe we were just dumb compared to kids today. LOL!!!

  43. #1493
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I remember. My Grandma had both.
    Attachment 12632
    We had both in our house. My grandmother had a washboard abd a singer sewing machine from the 1900h's.

    I still have an old-fashioned wall plug-in phone attached to a land line, with wires coming from a telephone pole located in my neighbour's backyard.

  44. #1494
    Quote Originally Posted by robb_k View Post
    Attachment 12632
    We had both in our house. My grandmother had a washboard abd a singer sewing machine from the 1900h's.

    I still have an old-fashioned wall plug-in phone attached to a land line, with wires coming from a telephone pole located in my neighbour's backyard.
    Robb was it the type that had the foot pedal? My Grandma had one those too. She got an electric one later.

  45. #1495
    Mom and Grandma both had Singer sewing machines. I remember my sister buying Singer patterns from the store and making some of her own clothes. Did any of you have a manual typewriter? You had to press hard to get the keys to strike the ribbon (which got ink on your fingers while changing unless you were careful).

  46. #1496
    Did anybody besides me play with Clackers (Click-Clacks), the most annoying toy from the '70s? They were as pointless as paddle balls.


  47. #1497
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Mom and Grandma both had Singer sewing machines. I remember my sister buying Singer patterns from the store and making some of her own clothes. Did any of you have a manual typewriter? You had to press hard to get the keys to strike the ribbon (which got ink on your fingers while changing unless you were careful).
    Yes! We had one of those old manual typewriters . If you messed up, you had start all over until they came out with that magic tape stuff or white out LOL! It was bad, so was the memograph machines. Remember those?

  48. #1498
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Did anybody besides me play with Clackers (Click-Clacks), the most annoying toy from the '70s? They were as pointless as paddle balls.

    I had those. They quickly went from being a dangerous toy to being a weapon LOL!!!!

  49. #1499
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I had those. They quickly went from being a dangerous toy to being a weapon LOL!!!!
    What could possibly go wrong with kids playing with glass balls on strings? Those things could give you a concussion with minimal effort.

  50. #1500
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    What could possibly go wrong with kids playing with glass balls on strings? Those things could give you a concussion with minimal effort.
    They use to shatter. There was this story about some kid in America at the time that got pieces of glass in his eye......yeah right! It's like how when some kid found a razor blade in his apple that ended Trick or Treating for us. LOL!

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