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Thread: Remember when?

  1. #101
    Remember when the insurance man would come to your house to collect?

  2. #102
    I don't. But I remember the milk man left glass bottles of milk on the porch. I also remember returning those bottles and also 16 oz pop bottles for the return of the 10 cent deposit.

  3. #103
    The 1970s, when, for Ashford & Simpson concerts at Avery Fisher Hall, Gladys Knight & the Pips at the Waldorf, Labelle (the group) and Patti Labelle solo, Diana Ross anywhere, etc, etc - the crowd DRESSED!

  4. #104
    Not just that, Rob. The acts actually dressed well. People would walked out of Smokey and the Miracles came out with wearing wife beaters and jeans sagging low enough to show their underwear.
    Last edited by Jerry Oz; 09-02-2015 at 03:18 AM.

  5. #105
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember when the insurance man would come to your house to collect?
    Yep! Early on Saturday mornings. Mr. Johnny Shelfelter would always be at that front door......hehehehehehehe.....!

  6. #106
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    When I was a kid, there was always the rumor about, and fear of the house on the corner, the one with the big hippies who rode motorcycles, because someone said they injected drugs into the candy bars.
    We had similar experiences. We lived in a neighborhood full of old Victorian Era mansions and large homes built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. (think of the house on the Munsters....LOL!) There were real practicing witches in the neighborhood, hippies that had taken over a series of apartments and Gloria Steinem lived just a couple blocks over from us. LOL! Those were the days.......................LOL!

  7. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    I definitely remember dressing up to fly and then lighting up as soon as the non-smoking sign went out. LOL
    How about when people could smoke anywhere they wanted to, even in hospital waiting rooms? Things are definitely better today.

  8. #108
    Remember when your dog would recognize the[dog catcher]truck and hid out back when he came through,hehehehe!!

  9. #109
    I remember school lunches when we all got hyped to find out that the entree of the day was mystery meat pizza. The other hot item at my high school was a burger (mostly soy, I think) in a bun slathered in beef gravy with grated onions and a pickle on top.

  10. #110
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    How about when people could smoke anywhere they wanted to, even in hospital waiting rooms? Things are definitely better today.
    Exactly! We all had our own ashtrays in our desks in our cubicles. Never had to worry about running out of cigarettes because everyone in the office had a pack! You could smoke in the doctor's office when I was a kid.

  11. #111
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember school lunches when we all got hyped to find out that the entree of the day was mystery meat pizza. The other hot item at my high school was a burger (mostly soy, I think) in a bun slathered in beef gravy with grated onions and a pickle on top.
    I remember the "mosqsuito" truck (the fogger), that came through the neighborhood billowing out huge clouds of smoke (pesticides) to kill them and all the children running around in the thick cloud of smoke!

  12. #112
    Ok guys, read this and nod your heads, because you know it was all true! LOL!!1

    http://www.siliconhell.com/humour/children.htm

    Children of the 50's, 60's and 70's



    According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 50's, 60's, and 70's probably shouldn't have survived!

    Our baby cots were covered with brightly coloured lead-based paint which was promptly chewed and licked.

    We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, or latches on doors or cabinets and it was fine to play with pans.

    When we rode our bikes, we wore no helmets, just flip flops and fluorescent clackers' on our wheels.

    As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the passenger seat was a treat.

    We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle - tasted the same.

    We ate dripping sandwiches, bread and butter pudding and drank fizzy pop with sugar in it, but we were never overweight because we were always outside playing.

    We shared one drink with four friends, from one bottle or can and no one actually died from this.

    We would spend hours building go-carts out of scraps and then went top speed down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into stinging nettles a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

    We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back before it got dark. No one was able to reach us all day and no one minded.

    We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no Internet chat rooms. We had friends - we went outside and found them.

    We played elastics and street rounders, and sometimes that ball really hurt.

    We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits. They were accidents. We learnt not to do the same thing again.

    We had fights, punched each other hard and got black and blue- we learned to get over it.

    We walked to friend's homes.

    We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate live stuff, and although we were told it would happen, we did not have very many eyes out, nor did the live stuff live inside us forever.

    We rode bikes in packs of 7 and wore our coats by only the hood.

    Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law. Imagine that!

    This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all. And you're one of them. Congratulations!

    Please pass this on to others who have had the luck to grow up as real kids, before lawyers and government regulated our lives, for our own good. (If you aren't old enough, thought you might like to read about us).


  13. #113
    Hey marv...you can't keep finding this stuff[i'm tearin up over here]where did those days go...and where is my youth,hehehehehehehehe!!!

  14. #114
    Remember the[watermelon man]coming through in the heat of summer and all the kids were glad to see him...watermelons,red to the rhine!!

  15. #115
    I remember hearing the ice cream man from three blocks away. It was just enough time to run home and get some loot before he arrived on our street. It was world shattering when we expected him to turn toward us and we saw him drive by instead.

  16. #116
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Hey marv...you can't keep finding this stuff[i'm tearin up over here]where did those days go...and where is my youth,hehehehehehehehe!!!
    A friend of mine from a small town in Ohio shared this with me a few years ago and it did make me stop, think , laugh, become sad and wishful for the good ole days......

  17. #117
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember the[watermelon man]coming through in the heat of summer and all the kids were glad to see him...watermelons,red to the rhine!!
    Yes I remember. He had a truck that was open on both sides, had a Toledo Scale on it to weigh produce and it had either bells or a funny horn to let you he was on the street. He would sale all sizes of watermelons.

  18. #118
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I remember hearing the ice cream man from three blocks away. It was just enough time to run home and get some loot before he arrived on our street. It was world shattering when we expected him to turn toward us and we saw him drive by instead.


    Yep Jerry. In the very early sixties he had the "Popsicle Man" that road down the street on a bike with a box cooler attached to the front. Later on the Ice Cream Man or Good Humor Man in the white trucks with the music came through.

  19. #119
    I used to love hearing that song until I found out the tune was from perhaps the most racist popular recording in American music. Now, every time I hear it, my blood begins to boil. Only click if you want your memories dashed.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswit...t-news-for-you

  20. #120
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    I used to love hearing that song until I found out the tune was from perhaps the most racist popular recording in American music. Now, every time I hear it, my blood begins to boil. Only click if you want your memories dashed.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswit...t-news-for-you
    Yes I remember that damned song! LOL! It was hypnotic to a kid, now I can't stand to hear it. No we did not know it had racist connotations to it at the time.

  21. #121
    Where I went to junior high school, Tuesdays lunchroom special was a steak sandwich with grilled onions and tomato sauce. Couldn't wait to get to school . . . on Tuesdays.

  22. #122
    Quote Originally Posted by Methuselah2 View Post
    Where I went to junior high school, Tuesdays lunchroom special was a steak sandwich with grilled onions and tomato sauce. Couldn't wait to get to school . . . on Tuesdays.
    You must have went to school in France? LOL!
    We never got quality meals like that in American public schools LOL

  23. #123
    Quote Originally Posted by marv2 View Post
    you must have went to school in france? Lol!
    We never got quality meals like that in american public schools lol
    haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa...you got that right,all we got was canned potatoes and potted meat.

  24. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by jerry oz View Post
    i used to love hearing that song until i found out the tune was from perhaps the most racist popular recording in american music. Now, every time i hear it, my blood begins to boil. Only click if you want your memories dashed.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswit...t-news-for-you
    wow jerry,i don't remember that one or didn't know what it meant if i did,the good humor man just sort of rang his bells.

  25. #125
    I remember when I discovered newspapers. I knew much more about current events back then because I read them from front page to last. So, I was forced to know a little bit about a wide range. Thanks to the web, I know a whole lot about a few things and a lot less about things that don't interest me.

  26. #126
    Don't read too much into my steak sandwich post. It was a Philly steak sandwich which, at that time, was a few thin slices of chuck steak (I think called braising steak in the UK) and onions, tomato sauce, and roll. It was delicious and impossible to pass up at 35!

  27. #127
    Remember those round potatoes that we ate at lunch,we use to have potato fights and they would close the cafeteria.

  28. #128
    Remember when potatoes were not coated with a substance that inhibited the growth of eyes (allowing us to grow our own)? Also, I remember when corn and soy beans weren't genetically manipulated and classified as pesticides by the FDA, allowing Monsanto and other companies to bully farmers into paying only them for seeds under fear of being sued into bankruptcy.

  29. #129
    Hey jerry you just mentioned[greasy grady's]entire food output.

  30. #130
    (Grady's a different issue. His food isn't a pesticide because no decent fly would go near it.)

    Remember when it took two minutes to sign on to the internet through your modem so you could wait for 45 minutes to download video for a 90 second movie trailer?

  31. #131
    Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa...hey jerry it takes me forty five minutes to sign on,this thing is so slow i can order a snack from greasy's wait for the health inspector to condem it and still have time before this thing comes on.

  32. #132
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa...you got that right,all we got was canned potatoes and potted meat.
    And some kind of weird beef and soy mixture they called a hamburger patty. I've tasted better hospital food!

  33. #133
    Quote Originally Posted by soulster View Post
    And some kind of weird beef and soy mixture they called a hamburger patty. I've tasted better hospital food!
    Yep. Mystery meat. They got away with slathering it with gravy and calling it Salisbury Steak, but every so often the snuck it in as plain old hamburgers. They put a similarly gray substance on the pizzas, but those pizzas sold out like hot cakes.

  34. #134
    Quote Originally Posted by arr&bee View Post
    Remember those round potatoes that we ate at lunch,we use to have potato fights and they would close the cafeteria.
    Tater Tots!!!! There is a restaurant in Manhattan that serves "vintage" lunches and they have them on their menu along with Nestle Quick and other foods I remember from childhood.

  35. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Yep. Mystery meat. They got away with slathering it with gravy and calling it Salisbury Steak, but every so often the snuck it in as plain old hamburgers. They put a similarly gray substance on the pizzas, but those pizzas sold out like hot cakes.
    Yeah salisbury steak was part tofu or something. We use to get excited over pizza on a bun in Jr. High LOL!

  36. #136
    Lunch was so bad in jr.high that we petitioned the schoolboard to eliminate lunch.

  37. #137
    Remember when only the bad guys went out with their faces covered (except for the Lone Ranger).

  38. #138
    I remember Friday night fish fries. My Pops wore the coolest sunglasses (even at night), porkpie hats, and stove pipe pants and used to drink Stroh's from long necked bottles. He remains the epitome of cool in my mind to this day. (Think I'll tell him that when I see him later today.) All of my family would show up and Motown seemed to be played every other song on the record player.

  39. #139
    Remember when we used to[block]our hats and you wouldn't dare leave the house with[dirty chucks]or unpolished shoes.

  40. #140
    Remember when churches only had[one]offering on sunday?

  41. #141
    I started swimming lessons when I was in second grade at the YMCA in the fall of 1969. My mom would give me a quarter, which I used to get a soda (5 cents) and two candy bars (10 cents each) out of their vending machines. One Saturday I finished swimming and went to the vending machines and my heart sank: sodas had been raised to 10 cents and candy bars to 15 cents. In one week, my snack purchases had been cut from three items to two.

  42. #142
    Remember when comic books cost a dime instead of $4.00?

  43. #143
    Haaaaaaaaaaaa..hey jerry,remember when finding a dime on the sidewalk was a big deal?

  44. #144
    Yep. I also remember when gas wars had gas prices below 30 cents a gallon.

  45. #145
    Remember when you could form your hands in the shape of a gun and point at your buddies without the swat team showing up at your school?

  46. #146
    I remember not knowing what 'SWAT' was until the TV series debuted on ABC. Now, it's not just something that we are all familiar with, it's actually become a verb for when people call 911 and report an active hostage situation at a private residence necessitating deployment of SWAT to rush out and endanger lives. You know, because the caller thinks it's so very funny.



    Remember when people didn't do reckless and incredibly dangerous things (like calling SWAT when there's no emergency) because they think it's funny?

  47. #147
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    Remember when comic books cost a dime instead of $4.00?
    Oh yeah! We'd beg our moms for some change so we could go down to the convenience store on our bikes and buy a bottle of soda, a candy bar, and a comic book.

    I remember around 1974, we discovered Wacky Packages. We'd go down to the convenience store during school lunch (the one year they actually allowed us fifth and sixth grade kids to leave campus during school hours) and buy them with our lunch money. We stuck those things on everything: our notebooks, books, desks, and bikes. We all outgrew them a year later.

  48. #148
    It's it just me, out did kids seem to enjoy the simplest things back in the day more than they do now? My Mom would cut holes in paper bags and we would put our heads and arms through them and walk around playing "robot" for an hour. I wonder if kids still play tag or hide-and-go-seek these days. I've seen them have meltdowns when they aren't given $59 for a brand new video game.

  49. #149
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Oz View Post
    It's it just me, out did kids seem to enjoy the simplest things back in the day more than they do now? My Mom would cut holes in paper bags and we would put our heads and arms through them and walk around playing "robot" for an hour. I wonder if kids still play tag or hide-and-go-seek these days. I've seen them have meltdowns when they aren't given $59 for a brand new video game.
    WE played cops & robbers with our toy cap guns, but never had to worry about someone using a real gun, or someone calling the cops.

    Hey, how about putting playing cards on your bicycle spokes with clothes pins to make noise, or putting hi-bars on the back of your bike to make them mimic Harleys. We called 'em "sissy bars" for some reason.

  50. #150
    I remember putting the cards in the spokes as well as a balloon (louder, at least until they burst) to make it obvious when I was riding by. And I remember sissy bars on old Stingray bikes. Stingrays look so funny nowadays. For some reason, I only see old stoner looking dudes on them instead of kids.

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